Sekhar Raghavan

Involvement of women in designing toilets was very important for the success of the programme, the presentation says.

This presentation by Sekhar Raghavan, Director, Rain Centre, Chennai, India highlights the experiences and the challenges faced by Rain Centre in introducing ecological sanitation in the coastal town of Kovalam near Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India along with Coastal and Rural development Trust (CRDT), a small non profit centre based in Kovalam .

The coastal town of Kovalam was selected as a case because of its peculiar situation with its location in a fast developing  peri-urban area in proximity to Chennai city characterised by good groundwater situation, adequate land and housing facilities, but with a glaring and urgent need and demand for toilets.

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Talk by Sekhar Raghavan, Rain Centre, at the Rotary Club of Madras South weekly meeting on 26 April 2011 on rainwater harvesting and ecological sanitation

Content Courtesy: Rotary Madras South

Talk by Sekhar Raghavan, Rain Centre, at the Rotary Club of Madras South weekly meeting on 26 April 2011 on rainwater harvesting and ecological sanitation - Part 1.

 

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Residents of Chennai need to look for self-reliant measures on water use, write Sekhar Raghavan & Indukanth Ragade

The water position in Chennai has been satisfactory for several years now because of a couple of good monsoons, good supply from Andhra Pradesh and from the Veeranam Lake. The rainwater harvesting systems installed by many citizens have also helped in improving ground water levels. However, citizens should not presume that their water problems are solved for the following reasons;


Chennai’s water needs are mainly met by impounding the rainwater from the Araniar-Kortalayar rivers north of the city and the capacity of the reservoirs is woefully inadequate. It has been estimated that an entire year’s supply flows wastefully into the sea consequently. The quantum of supply from AP and the Veeranam Lake is uncertain.

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A brief look at the historical development of traditional rainwater harvesting systems of India ans also issues, need and relevance of RWH in the urban context

The document informs that traditionally Indians worshipped both water and rain as “Jala” and “Varuna”. Even rivers were worshipped. Till 3000 B.C., RWH happened without human effort as rain got collected in rivers and natural depressions. Civilizations flourished on river banks all over the world Indus valley civilization in India.

From 3000 B.C. to 1800 A.D., RWH happened with human effort. Indians harvested rainwater using different methods. These methods depended on local conditions.

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