Technology

Water is life, essential for daily sustenance and healthy living. With plummeting groundwater levels, contamination of water sources and increasing consumption, challenges in the water sector have increased manifold. Safe, sustainable and affordable water in the face of growing water needs is a severe challenge. With fresh water supplies already hard pressed to meet growing demand, technology plays an important role in managing and using the limited available water in a cost effective and critical manner.

Water contamination occurs both due to human activities and natural processes. Depending upon the purpose for which the water is needed--municipal, industrial or agriculture--treatment is carried out. The technology used will depend upon the current water quality, future standards required and economics of the treatment method. Water treatment removes contaminants that may be biological, physical or chemical in nature. 

Various water treatment technologies are present that purify polluted water by removing undesirable chemicals or biological contaminants and making it fit for human consumption. Use based classification of surface waters in India has been laid down by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). The details of the permissible and desirable limits of various parameters in drinking water as per Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) standard specifications for potable water are also detailed in the IS 10500:1991

Water treatment plants use technologies to produce water that is safe both chemically and biologically, and that is appealing in terms of colour, odour and taste. The control point for water quality determination must be the consumer's tap and not the treatment facility, which means that the water quality must not be impaired during transmission, storage and distribution to the user. The treatment methods at the plant include aeration, coagulation and flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection.  Some of the prevalent water purification & treatment technologies are listed below.

  • Capacitive Deionization (CDI) is a technology where ions are removed from water by passing it through a spacer channel with porous electrodes on each side
  • Ozonation is a chemical water treatment technique based on the infusion of ozone into water
  • Ultraviolet technology uses Ultraviolet light, just like sunlight, to kill micro-organisms present in the water
  • Reverse Osmosis (RO) is a technology that removes a large majority of contaminants by pushing the water under pressure through a semi-permeable membrane
  • TERAFIL is a burnt red clay porous media used for filtration & treatment of raw water into clean drinking water, developed Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR), Bhubaneshwar 
  • OS- Community scale Arsenic Filter is an organic arsenic filter, developed by IIT Kharagpur
  • Filtration methods that may include rapid/ slow sand filters remove dirt, rust, silt, dust and other particulate matter from water
  • Solar water purification systems 

Water treatment technologies for safe, potable water in rural areas that includes Capacitive Deionization Technology (CDI) using carbon aerogel, solar operated groundwater treatment plants and electro chlorination are described in a booklet ‘Compendium of innovative technologies on rural drinking water & sanitation’ by the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation. 

Domestic drinking water filtration methods vary depending upon the method of purification used, the degree of ‘purity’ required, and the type of contaminants in the water. No one technology will fulfil all criteria--there is no ‘silver bullet’ solution. Some of the more popular methods for Household Water Treatment & Safe Storage (HWTS) options includes boiling, SODIS (Solar disinfection), Chlorine Tablets, Liquid Chlorine (online, Biosand filters, Flocculent treatment, Ceramic candle, Filter combinations, Pureit filters, Ultra Violet (UV) filters, Reverse Osmosis (RO) and Ion Exchange (IEX).

For more on water purification systems, click here.

Domestic Greywater Recycling Water filtration technologies

Any used water, other than sewage from toilet basins that exit a house or apartment complex, is referred to as sullage or greywater. This is mostly made up of water used in bathrooms and kitchens, constituting the bulk--nearly 60%-70%--of the total volume of water used in a day. 

Before underground sewerage was introduced in most cities, water followed a cyclical route. Water was drawn from dug wells within the premises. Refuse water from the bathrooms and kitchen was let out into the garden while water from the closets reached septic tanks. The soil treated the greywater and sent it back into the ground, thereby closing the household water consumption-reuse loop.

Contrary to popular belief, greywater is largely free from pathogens. As it is mostly made up of easily degradable organic waste and chemicals from cleaning products, it can be purified and reused in-situ with minimal effort. In many homes and apartment complexes, sending this perfectly reusable resource out of the plot along with sewage common-sight. Greywater can be brought back into the water cycle by employing simple biological and mechanical filtration techniques.

There are two basic requirements apart from the necessary plumbing arrangements for treating domestic wastewater:

  1. Open soil space
  2. Water loving plants

Water from bathrooms and kitchens can be diverted through a dedicated pipeline into the plant bed set aside for the treatment process. Here, the nutrients present in the waste water are absorbed by water loving plants such as Canna or Cyperus while the soil bacteria polish off the organic waste from the water. 

  • Constructed wetlands – These wetlands are created to replicate the process of bio-filtration that occurs in a natural setting. Here, the water is purified using two media, the planted surface and the gravel bed underneath. 
  • Reed bed treatment plants – A smaller version of the constructed wetlands, reed beds are perfect for individual houses and smaller complexes.
  • Mechanical filtration – Mechanical systems such as sand filters and pebble flow systems can be used to help filter out waste from the water by separating the discernable solids from the liquid component. 
  • Lava filters – These pebble filters are a combination of both biological and mechanical systems where the stones act as support structures for microorganisms that help break down the waste. 

For more on the basics of rainwater harvesting and greywater recycling, refer Self reliance in water: A book by Indukanth Ragade.  

Sewage treatment--Municipal and Industrial

Waste water flowing out of urinals and toilet closets are referred to as ‘blackwater’ or sewage. Blackwater cannot be treated in the same way as greywater as the former contains a heavy pathogen load from the fecal matter suspended in it. Sewage from towns and cities flowing directly into water bodies is one of the major reasons for water pollution.

Municipal wastewater treatment plant, Yelahanka, Bangalore

While City Corporations are in charge of laying underground sewerage pipes to collect, channel and treat sewage, localities outside city limits have a greater responsibility of managing their own waste. Apartment complexes and townships mostly rely on small scale sewage treatment plants (STP) to treat their waste.

Wastewater can be treated either in the presence or absence of oxygen. While aerobic digestion involves the breakdown of waste by microorganisms in the presence of oxygen, anaerobic systems work in its absence. Various types of processes are used to treat both domestic and industrial waste water such as:

  • Activated Sludge Process where biological agents such as bacteria are used in the presence of air to oxidise the nutrients present in the sewage 
  • Sequencing Batch Reactors help equalize, aerate and sediment waste water in timed batches by mixing it with activated sludge and oxygen to reduce the organic load 
  • Membrane Bio Reactors provide a higher degree of organic and solid removal by combining the principles of both mechanical filtration and biological digestion to treat municipal waste 
  • Moving Bed Bioreactors are mainly used for aerating and treating high-strength wastewater where several floating polyethylene bio-films move in suspension provide surface area for the nutrient-digesting bacteria to grow 
  • Trickling filters are low-cost, aerobic systems made up of a fixed bed of gravel, rocks and moss over through sewage is passed to remove the nutrient material in the suspension 
  • Facultative aerated lagoons are shallow ponds where the sewage is allowed to with the atmospheric oxygen in the upper layers while the sludge settles down at the bottom 
  • Waste stabilisation ponds, categorized into three broad types – anaerobic, facultative and aeobic depending on the oxygen use intensity – help in reducing nutrient content and polishing waste water to re-use quality 
  • Up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket digestion treats wastewater in the absence of oxygen where the feed enters the tank through the bottom and flows upward as the bacteria present in the sludge digest organic the matter 

The CPCB publication on the status of sewage treatment in India throws light on the performance of sewage treatment plants across the country and the technologies currently being used in them. The status of waste water generation and treatment across the country is also available on the ENVIS Centre on hygiene, sanitation, sewage treatment systems and technology. 

  • Kerala retains the top slot with a score of 70, followed closely by Himachal Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Telangana in the latest edition of NITI Aayog’s annual assessment of progress made by states in achieving the sustainable development goals (SDG). “Kerala is well on track to ac...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 8 months 5 days agoread more
  • We are from a society with 840 flats in 4 blocks of 21 floors each. Our builder and the STP person says that it is recommended to have a 50/50 or 60/40 ratio of sewage treated water and potable water before it is released to our domestic flush tanks. Is this ratio justified? We have seen earlier tha...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • Maheen Mirza’s film ‘Agar wo desh banati/ If she built a country’ looks at the widespread displacement on an unprecedented scale for mines and industries in Raigarh, Chhattisgarh. The devastation of the environment, the cutting-off of the relationship of the people with their forests, the appa...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • Hi Sir, I want to reuse greywater for flushing tank at appartment with four floors and 16 flats. Want to use wastewater from bathroom, washing machine and kitchen for flushing in toilets. What steps to be taken. Please give me your valuable information and necessary suggestions.
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • Centre approves Atal Bhujal Yojana, worth Rs 6,000 croreConsidering the acute groundwater shortage in the country, the Union Cabinet has approved the Atal Bhujal Yojana with a total outlay of Rs 6,000 crore to manage the critical resources of water through multiple activities. The scheme, that wi...
    Swati Bansalposted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • Sustainable development goals index 2019-20: India's composite score improvesThe list of states that have topped in the sustainable development goals index 2019-20 are Kerala, Himachal Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Telangana. Also, the index revealed that Uttar Pradesh, Odisha and Sikkim h...
    Swati Bansalposted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • Groundwater contamination has emerged as an alarming issue in India and a recent UN report reveals that India ranks 120th among the 122 countries in terms of water quality index. As high as 70 percent of the water supply in India is contaminated, resulting in nearly 0.2 million deaths each year. Po...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • Dear Team, Recently I constructed my house and the construction work is almost at the end stage. I plan to dig a borewell in my house, however, there isn't any space for it. Moreover, I fear of cracks to develop because of the digging work which might impact my basement as well. I have a space of o...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • This compendium by Mihir Kumar Maitra is a valuable resource for all practitioners engaged in watershed management activities in the field. The first part of the book addresses the technical and engineering aspects useful in developing natural resources like land, surface water, groundwater, crops a...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 8 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • Green signal to Kalasa-Banduri project heldThe Environment Ministry has put on hold the clearances granted to the Karnataka government for the Kalasa-Banduri project, as it is awaiting the judgement of the Mahadayi Water Dispute Tribunal (MWDT), to which both governments of Goa and Karnataka had fil...
    Swati Bansalposted 8 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • India leads the world in pollution-linked deaths: StudyAccording to a report by the Global Alliance on Health and Pollution (GAHP), India and China led in the number of deaths linked to pollution, with about 2.3 million and 1.8 million respectively, followed by Nigeria, Indonesia and Pakistan. ...
    Swati Bansalposted 8 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • I have borewell, around 300 ft depth, which s being used from past five years.1 HP submersible pump is fitted, but suddenly the motor is running and water is not pumping out to tank, is there any dryness of well? What would be the reason and what steps I need to take to resolve this problem. Regard...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 8 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Study finds, only one out of five river basins in the country can cope with climate change According to a new study by the Indian Institute of Technology – Indore (IIT-I), only one out of five river basins in the country can withstand extreme weather events and eight out of 10 vegetation types in...
    Swati Bansalposted 8 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Agriculture the largest consumer of groundwater in India Agriculture consumes the largest share of groundwater in India - the biggest user of groundwater in the world. The past few decades have witnessed an alarming depletion of groundwater resources in the country. While almost half of the agricul...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 8 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • How do we get the govt support in constructing toilets for villagers in a village near Bhopal?
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 9 months 21 hours agoread more
  • Borewell is drilled till 280ft. Got water at 90ft, however, after 110 ft got sand up to 160ft after that there is rock. Casing is up to 119ft. Now the motor pump is at 150ft. Getting to much sandy water. After few hours water is not coming, but the motor continues to run. This is happening again and...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 9 months 1 day agoread more
  • We have a new borewell with 300 feet depth and 4.5 inch dia. Need suggestion on submersible pumpset to pull water to groundfloor + three floors With 3 inch dia and 1.5 HP.
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 9 months 2 days agoread more
  • Locals say impact assessment report does not accurately represent the real impact of Luhri II hydropower project Calling the Luhri II Hydropower Project a farce, residents of Nanj village in Karsog have rejected the Social Impact Assessment (SIA) report prepared as part of the rules preceding ...
    Swati Bansalposted 9 months 4 days agoread more
  • Ensure 100 percent treatment of sewage entering rivers: NGT to authorities Taking note of polluted rivers in the country, the National Green Tribunal has ordered local bodies and concerned departments to ensure 100 percent treatment of sewage entering rivers across the country, by March 31st 2020. ...
    Swati Bansalposted 9 months 4 days agoread more
  • A new study finds that introducing coarse cereals such as millet and sorghum could improve India’s national food supply in many ways. The study by the Data Science Institute at Columbia University found that India’s agricultural policies have largely focused on the single objective of maxim...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 9 months 4 days agoread more

Pages

How does Piramal Sarvajal plan to deal with the water crisis in the country?

Piramal Sarvajal, seeded by the Piramal Foundation in 2008, is a mission driven social enterprise which designs and deploys innovative solutions for creating affordable access to safe drinking water in underserved areas. Sarvajal aims at developing technologies and business practices in the safe drinking water sector that are designed to make a purely market-based model sustainable in both rural and urban deployment conditions.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Take up this survey on hand washing being conducted by Sigma Foundation, in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

A hand washing survey is being conducted by SIGMA Foundation, a not for profit society, in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The objective is to know about handwashing practices being followed across different sections of the society in India. The data will be analysed to plan for appropriate interventions in improving handwashing practices in the country on a sustainable basis. 

Take the survey

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Conservation measures such as rainwater harvesting and recharging of groundwater need to be generally well established in both rural and urban areas.

The conventional freshwater sources available in India are being currently overexploited, leading to widespread environmental degradation and depletion of freshwater resources especially groundwater. To sustain the needs of an increasing population and ecology, our consumption of water far exceeds the rate at which we are recharging water sources. We are faced with water scarcity and will find it hard to meet the future regional demands.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

A workshop highlights the need to give a boost to affordable household water treatment and storage technologies.

India has the most people in the world without access to safe drinking water (133.9 million). Many studies indicate that poor and marginalized populations are the worst affected from waterborne diseases resulting from the consumption of contaminated water. The issue warrants urgent attention as each year over 140,000 children under age five die from diarrheal diseases alone.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

After heavy rain last year ( Oct to Dec). I have observed water colour in my borewell getting yellow and smelly. My borewell is 170 ft and septic tank and wastewater tank of my neighbour is 5ft from my borewell I have flushed borewell two times in Feb but no result still water is same yellow and smell.

What is the solution? Can I install any filters, as I don't have space for a new borewell? During flushing, water was available from 30 to 40 ft from ground. I am suspecting that the water is smelly because of septic tank water mixing. Kindly suggest solution for this.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Plz help me select a motor pump to lift water from a 140ft deep borewell for a three-storeyed building.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Jal Jeevan Mission can go a long way to promote springshed management and ensure source sustainability of spring based piped water supply.

Springs are the key source of water for rural households in Uttarakhand, yet they have seen an overall neglect over the decades with discharge from many springs declining bit by bit. The depletion of aquifers, changes in land use and ecological degradation have led to several initiatives to address springshed management in the state. We speak to Dr.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

While the Covid-19 pandemic has affected both men and women from the informal sector differently, gender analysis is missing from India’s Covid-19 response strategy

The Covid-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc worldwide and India continues to be in the line of fire. While cases continue to rise, India also is experiencing a crisis of another kind, that of the lockdown affecting the livelihoods of a large number of workers from the informal sector.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Who will be the authority to check salinity of water? At what salinity, it should be considered as sea water? Whom to complaint regarding creeks not included in CRZ maps?

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Government of Maharashtra and UNICEF Mumbai are training frontline workers to tackle the spread of COVID-19.

Maharashtra has the highest COVID-19 cases in the country and the government is taking a slew of measures to flatten the curve. We speak to Mr. Yusuf Kabir, WASH specialist and emergency focal point for UNICEF Mumbai, who is at the forefront of the containment efforts to find out about their efforts towards water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in urban and rural areas especially to tackle COVID-19 spread.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Technology