Rural Water

  • Dibang hydel project gets Centre's nod The Centre has decided to construct the 3000 MW Dibang Hydroelectric Project in Arunachal Pradesh without carying out any public consultation or impact study. On request from the new Government, the Expert Appraisal Committee has reconsidered the environmental...
    swatiposted 4 years 6 months agoread more
  • Uttarakhand Government submits to Centre the Rs 9,478 crore Ganga Action Plan The Uttarakhand Government has submitted an Action Plan worth Rs 9,478 crore, for cleaning the Ganga river from Gaumukh to Haridwar. The Plan proposes to set up new sewage systems at 132 locations and new solid waste mana...
    swatiposted 4 years 7 months agoread more
  • Cheyyur, a town 100 km from Chennai in Kanchipuram, has been identified as the site for a 4000 MW Ultra Mega Power Plant (UMPP) by the Government of Tamil Nadu. Ultra Mega Power Projects are a series of ambitious power projects planned by the Government of India where each UMPP is said to have ...
    Divya Nposted 4 years 7 months agoread more
  • 50% of MGNREGS work should be for improving water conservation: Government In the wake of drought-like conditions in the country, the Rural Development Minister has ordered the states to undertake 50% of work under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) to...
    swatiposted 4 years 7 months agoread more
  • The name of a place can tell one much about its history. Take Mokla talab, a village 62 km southeast of Udaipur for example. Mokla means sufficient in Rajasthani and talab means pond. The village was named after its overflowing talab. But what happens when the talaab is overflowi...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 7 months agoread more
  • Pro-dam lobby has long praised the small or micro hydropower projects, especially run-of-the-river units as least damaging. But both the developer/s of such projects and the government seem to have overlooked an important aspect: its impact on Kuhls, the traditional irrigation system of Himachal Pra...
    sabitakaushalposted 4 years 9 months agoread more
  • Every year, nearly 600,000 children in India die of illnesses associated with unclean drinking water [1]. Inspite of this, 2 out of every 3 households still do not treat their drinking water [2] and half of the rural water supply, where 70 percent of India’s population lives, is routinel...
    sabitakaushalposted 4 years 9 months agoread more
  •  Visitors and the Uttarakhand Tourism Department liken the mountain to 'devbhoomi' or the heavens but it isn't often that a villager of the area echoes those sentiments. Most of them are weary of the unending struggle to live in harmony with those steep slopes that make all manner of infra...
    chicuposted 4 years 9 months agoread more
  • Hello,I would like to get data on water usage from 2000 to 2010 in India by different sectors like Agriculture, Rural, Domestic, Industries and etc. Please help
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 4 years 10 months agoread more
  • The Position: The Director- Water and Sanitation- will be based in the company's Gurgaon office. The role is envisaged to cover the areas of business development, networking, project management and quality assurance, managing and mentoring teams to convert vision and strategy into disciplined execut...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 4 years 10 months agoread more
  • "We did everything ourselves", said the ebuillent Bhuvaneshwari Devi. "We took the cement up, carried the sand, everything! And we even told them where to place the tank"! She went on to narrate how the women's group of which she is a member, taught the men of the village that siting a tank in the s...
    chicuposted 4 years 10 months agoread more
  • NGT tells Mahagenco to use clean coalThe National Green Tribunal has ordered the Maharashtra power utility to strictly abide by the Environment Ministry's notification, which prohibits coal and power utilities from using coal that has over 34% ash content. Inferior quality coal generates large amoun...
    ravleenposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • The rural-urban divide in access to sanitation reduces: UN In the year 1990, more than 76% people living in urban areas all over the world had access to improved sanitation as opposed to only 28% in rural areas but in 2012, 80% urban dwellers and 47% rural ones had access to better sanitation. Even...
    ravleenposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • NGT orders Singrauli power plants to supply drinking water to residentsThe Tribunal has warned the power plants of closure if they do not provide clean drinking water to residents whose main water sources, the Rihand reservoir and nearby rivers, have been polluted by the fly ash from the plants. The...
    ravleenposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • 1999 was an interesting real estate year for Mehdiganj village in Uttar Pradesh. Someone began buying up land adjoining a soft drink factory owned by the Parle Company. They also began buying land from the farmers except the farmers had no idea as to whom they were selling the land to. As the bounda...
    chicuposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • Bangalore water mafia goes innovative to evade lawThe water mafia, with the help of local political leaders, has taken to digging borewells in rented premises in localities closer to lakes. This started after the government started monitoring borewells in the cityToxic veggies on Navi Mumbai's railw...
    ravleenposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • Finally, prediction of low monsoon from the horse's mouthThe Indian Meteorological Department, corroborating global assessment of the El Nino, has predicted “below normal” rainfall during monsoon this year with a rainfall of 95% of the long period average Low rainfall kills tea crop in TripuraAb...
    ravleenposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • No deal on Teesta irks Bangladesh Opposition The Bangladesh Nationalist Party has blamed the ruling government for not being able to ink a deal on Teesta river's water sharing. Dams on the river on the Indian side have hindered its flow and led to water scarcity in northern BangladeshAlarming w...
    ravleenposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • Himachal villages to carry out own EIA90,000 people from 250 villages in the Sutlej basin of Himachal Pradesh decide to carry out their own assessment of the environmental damage caused by hydropower projects. They allege that the state-sponsored Indian Council of Forest Research and Education repor...
    ravleenposted 4 years 12 months agoread more
  • Drinking water in more than half rural homes contaminatedEven as 99% of urban and 97% rural households in India have drinking water access, 41% urban and 60% rural homes still get contaminated water, says the latest study published in Lancet, a British medical journalManganese in Goa's prime reservo...
    ravleenposted 4 years 12 months agoread more

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The Somb-Thapana catchment is a stark contrast to the polluted Yamuna. Knowledge from the Thames and the local communities revived the water.

River Yamuna, the largest tributary of river Ganga, is the most threatened river system in the country. It faces over abstraction of water and increasing pollution load (municipal and industrial) throughout its course. The river has no worthwhile perennial tributary along its most threatened 600km stretch--from Hathnikund (Haryana) to Etawah (Uttar Pradesh)--where it is revived after meeting with river Chambal. The Somb-Thapana catchment is a tributary feeding the Yamuna.

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There is a new technology available now to reuse domestic and industrial refuse. This could just be the solution to India’s increasing water problem.

The demand, supply, availability and access of water resources do not always match. Going by the UN estimates, by the year 2022, India is expected to surpass China's population to become the most populous country in the world. As the population increases, the demand for freshwater goes up; with increased usage, the quantum of waste produced increases as well. Changes in land-use patterns, climatic variabilities and diminished efficiency to use resources only strain the available reserves further.

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Villagers of Jadugoda say radiation from uranium mines is impairing their children. It’s high time the government took measures against it so a generation is not left crippled.

The body of Guria Das looked like that of a three-year-old when she passed away at the age of 13. Guria was born in 1999 with a condition that constrained her growth. Her father, Chhatua Das recounts how Guria, unable to speak or move, communicated with him and his wife through gestures; a language that only the three of them could comprehend. Born in Jadugoda, in Purbi Singhbhum district in Jharkhand, Guria was one of the many children who succumbed to the health complications from excessive radiation from the uranium mines.

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Caught between Malguzaars and the state government, the Malguzari tanks were left to die many years ago. A lone man spearheaded their revival in 2008.

Malguzari tanks were ponds made for water harvesting by the Malguzaars, who were zamindars or tenants in eastern Vidarbha, Maharashtra two centuries ago.These tanks provided water for irrigation and also increased the availability of fish for local consumption.

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An NGO’s effort to recharge the groundwater in an area finds little success with water-guzzling crops that rule the market.

Water crisis is a reality in most of India. After the summer of droughts come the monsoon floods. Take Maharashtra, for instance. If at one time it is desperately searching for drinking water, at another time, its capital, Mumbai is wading through knee-high water. How do we overcome these annual crises? Unfortunately, the answers are not so easy to find. 

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How paddy grew in popularity in Punjab and continues to steal the show, thanks to lack of alternatives for farmers.

Take the roads of Punjab during the monsoon and you will find most fields turned into pools of water. It’s mainly the water pulled out from the underground vault to support the kharif crop of paddy. Neither a native plant nor suited to the agro-climatic region, paddy has pushed out maize and cotton, which were common in the pre-green revolution era. From 2,27,000 hectares in 1960, the area under paddy rose to 26,12000 hectares by the year 2000. A growth rate of 1,050 percent!

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Despite the pitiable state of a polluted Kharun, the government is keen on developing the riverfront to attract tourists.

At sunrise, everything is luminous but not clear. 

― Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It and Other Stories

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Floods grip many parts of the country

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Pipara village in the parched Bundelkhand region stands out for its uninterrupted water supply. The village has their women to thank for it.

The cracks on the parched land of Bundelkhand are waiting for the monsoon to quench the thirst of its arid landscape. Despite the wide-spread drought here, Pipara, one of the villages in the region, stands apart as the only one that has not run completely dry. 

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Rural India walks too far to quench their thirst

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