Rural Water

  • Vikram Patel, a 71-year-old farmer in Chidavad village of Dewas district in Madhya Pradesh is one of the first farmers to have embraced the idea of farm ponds to increase the groundwater level in his farm. “For the last two decades, the Chidavad village in the Tonk Khurd block, was one among the ...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 years 9 months agoread more
  • Former Delhi CM Sheila Dikshit to be probed in water tanker scam Lieutenant governor Najeeb Jung has approved to take up the Anti-Corruption Branch (ACB) probe against the former chief minister of Delhi Sheila Dikshit for her alleged role in Rs 400 crore water tanker scam. The decision has been tak...
    swatiposted 3 years 9 months agoread more
  • Hirehandigola village in Gadag district of North Karnataka is an unsurprising picture of rural India. Hot, dry and dusty, it is populated by a largely lingayat community. About half the village has household toilets, significantly higher than the district average of 24% as per the 2011 Census. At fi...
    priyadposted 3 years 10 months agoread more
  • Access to safe drinking water and diarrhoeal diseases in India Although as high as 82.7 % rural and 91.4 % urban populations have access to safe drinking water in India according to the Census 2011, this does not provide assurance of adequate quality along with equitable distribution of water. The ...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 3 years 10 months agoread more
  • Since India became independent in 1947, the central and state governments have introduced various rural development schemes, and have been trying to get them to converge. While this effort hasn't been as impactful on a large scale, there are some success stories. Sarda Panchayat in Sambalpur, Odisha...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 years 11 months agoread more
  • Chirimiri Coalfield is a part of Central India Coalfields, located in Koriya district, Chhattisgarh. It is spread over 125 square kilometres with estimated total reserves of around 312.11 million tonnes. In the last 70 years, more than 250 springs that used to be the primary sources of dri...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 1 week agoread more
  • Centre releases DPR on forestry intervention for Ganga river The Water Resource Ministry has unveiled the Detailed Project Report (DPR) on Forestry Intervention for the Ganga which has been prepared by the Forest Research Institute, Dehradun. The project envisages the plantation of 4 crore native t...
    swatiposted 4 years 1 week agoread more
  • The goal of securing universal access to safe drinking water continues to be elusive for India inspite of the impressive strides made in the current years. The working paper titled 'Unravelling rural India’s enduring water indigence: Framing the questions, issues, options and opportunities' publis...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 2 weeks agoread more
  • Reservoir levels dip, Maharashtra urges people to celebrate dry holi Per the Central Water Commission weekly data, the storage availability at 91 major reservoirs in the country is at a mere 29% of their total storage capacity which is far below the average level of the last 10 years. Maharashtra, ...
    swatiposted 4 years 2 weeks agoread more
  • Water logging has been a persistent problem for farmers in the coastal areas of Puri, Odisha. Construction of national highways has affected the natural water drainage system and has changed the lands of thousands of farmers since 1980. Nobody noticed that the Ratnachira river and other natural cana...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 1 month agoread more
  • Agriculture, rural development and social sector is the focus of Budget 2016 In the Union Budget 2016, the Government has allocated Rs 35,984 crore for agriculture and farmer welfare, and plans to double the income of farmers by 2022. In addition, to increase the agricultural production and product...
    swatiposted 4 years 1 month agoread more
  • The East Coast of India is very much unlike its western counterpart both in terms of physiography and climatology. Unlike the West Coast which receives a predictable amount of rainfall within a predictable time frame, the East Coast is entirely dependent on the depressions in the Bay of Bengal to br...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 4 years 1 month agoread more
  • While the WatSan sector has been prioritised in the country’s policy agenda through the launch of the Swachh Bharat Mission, last year’s budgetary outlay was way below desired levels. The Ministry of Finance had organised a pre-budget consultation with the social sector organisations o...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 2 months agoread more
  • Hello,   We are working with a team of engineers and environmental consultants, who are currently researching existing tools and methodologies for assessing the Environmental Impact of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) projects, particularly small projects at the village or community scale...
    Sarika Seshadriposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • Coastal regions of Kendrapara and Jagatsinghpur districts of Odisha have been hit by cyclonic storms for more than two decades. These have severely affected the livelihood of the communities living in the region. Ashok Das of Junapangara village is one such farmer who had suffered massive agric...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • "More than eight villagers in Padapadar have died due to water-borne diseases such as typhoid, diarrhoea, jaundice, etc. in last five years", says Bir Mallick, an active member of Jeevika Suraksha Manch (JSM), an organisation working on tribal rights in Kandhamal district, Odisha. As per a repo...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • No temple is as venerated in Uttarakhand as the little unassuming naulas. These small hut-like structures dot the mountains and hold within them a great treasure--water. Usually made of stone masonry with pyramid-like slate roofs, every naula respresents within it a residing spirit which can ra...
    chicuposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • Erstwhile undivided Andhra Pradesh, like its neighbours Tamil Nadu and Karnataka, is a land of tanks. The ‘Cheruvus’, ‘Eris’ and ‘Keres’, as they are known in the respective regional languages, are irrigation tanks dug centuries ago by kings and philanthropists to feed thousands of acres...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • First water atlas of the Himalayas launched in ParisDuring the UN Climate Summit, an atlas of five of the ten major river basins in the Himalayas--Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Mekong and Salween--was released. The atlas uses maps and infographics to demonstrate changes in the climatic conditions in t...
    swatiposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • Paraswani village in Balodabazar district, Chhattisgarh contains vast reserves of limestone, a sedimentary rock that is a primary ingredient in the cement manufacturing process. Since 1992, Ultratech Cement Ltd. (UTCL) followed by four other similar companies, have begun excavating this rock within ...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 3 months agoread more

Pages

Watershed management is not just to harvest and store water but also to create democratic processes at the village level and enable inclusive, sustainable development that meets the people's needs.

In India, although we have approximately four months of monsoon (which is basically 45 days of effective rainfall), in drought prone areas, there are only 10-15 days of harvestable rain in the entire season. If you don't get enough rain during those days, it's a cause for worry.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

A temple trust revives an ancient stepwell, comes to the rescue of a water-starved village.

Long before piped water supply became the norm, groundwater got extracted for use and rivers neglected, stepwells served as a major source of water for people.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

To make access to water adequate and equitable, the focus must shift from water sources to water resources. Science, community participation and cooperation, are key to addressing our water woes.

A growing demand for water implies the need for an improved understanding of our resources, and the ability to manage that demand in an equitable and sustainable way.

Wells, not dams, have been the temples of modern India

India is a groundwater economy. At 260 cubic km per year, our country is the highest user of groundwater in the world - we use 25 percent of all groundwater extracted globally, ahead of USA and China.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

A photo exhibition focuses on the changing lifestyles of local communities in the Himalayas with changes in their environment.

Delhi’s Jor Bagh metro station is the site of an ongoing photographic exhibition with thought-provoking images and narratives exploring escalating water crises Indian and Nepal Himalayas face. Titled “Pani, Pahar: Waters of the Himalayas”, the exhibition combines contemporary work by photojournalist Toby Smith with academic research led by Dr Bhaskar Vira and Dr Eszter Kovacs at Cambridge University’s department of geography, in association with collaborators in India and Nepal.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Safer water and better nutrition were key in mitigating fluorosis problem in parts of the state.

Farhanuddin was just five years old when a pain in his knee began bothering him. It was 2013. Slowly, his legs began to change shape. They got so badly deformed that it began to affect his everyday life. He was gloomy and tired most times and had trouble walking. His parents thought that lengra bhoot or evil spirit was tormenting them like hundreds of others who were becoming crippled in the village of Tapatjuri in Nagaon district in Assam. Little Farhan could barely eat, wash or take a stroll without assistance.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The editor of a new book that lays out alternative futures for India discusses India, democracy and development with a noted journalist.

Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a new book that dares to imagine what India could be. Published by Authors Upfront, 35 author-activists, researchers and thinkers have drawn upon their experiences to write on alternative political, ecological, economic and sociocultural scenarios that will benefit India in its surge forward.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The video tells the story of residents of Korba and nearby villages who are affected by the fly ash from power plants which makes Korba the fifth critically polluted area in the country.

Korba in Chhattisgarh is an industrial area which has a significant number of coal mines and thermal power plants. Fly ash is a byproduct of the thermal power plants and has become a significant problem for the residents of Korba now. More than one lakh metric tonnes of fly ash is generated annually by the eight thermal power plants in Korba in Chhattisgarh which produce 6090 megawatts of electricity.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Kaudikasa village’s two decades of struggle with arsenic contamination in drinking water ends with a new government scheme.

Kaudikasa is a small village with a population of just 350 people in the Ambagad Chowki block of the Rajnandgaon district in Chhattisgarh. Despite its small size, Kaudikasa village has been in the news for all the wrong reasons. Severe health problems have been reported from the village, thanks to acute arsenic contamination in its groundwater. In fact, of the 22 villages affected by arsenic contamination in Ambagad Chowki block, Kaudikasa village is said to be the worst affected.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

While millions of people in India still wait for their share of water and toilets, this year's budget fails to give them any hope.

GoI allocations for the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation is Rs. 22,357 crores

For the first time in the last four years, the allocation for the sanitation programme Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) has gone down from Rs 19,248 (RE 2017-18) to Rs 17, 843 crore (2018-2019).

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The video tells us the success story of Kakaddara village that won the Satyamev Jayate Water Cup-2017 by efficiently managing its water.

Every year, thousands of villages in Maharashtra get affected by droughts. Experts say that the reasons for recurrent droughts include a lack of policy framework, technical knowledge and community participation as well as poor implementation of government programmes.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Rural Water