Rural Water

  • Country's first mobile chilled water kiosk in Rajasthan Rajasthan’s Barmer district has received the country’s first mobile-any-time-water kiosk that dispenses chilled water for the community. The initiative is a part of the corporate social responsibility of Cairn India that is supporting...
    swatiposted 2 years 10 months agoread more
  • Gazala Paul spent her 50th birthday among the Baiga people of Chhattisgarh. On the eve of her 25th wedding anniversary, she was in Rapar, a block near the Little Rann of Kutch, in a celebratory mood. The MLA of the region had come to a meeting organised with villagers from his constituency and promi...
    priyadposted 2 years 10 months agoread more
  • Jail term for selling packaged water above MRP: Government Consumer affairs minister, Ram Vilas Paswan has ordered to impose a penalty and jail term on those who sell bottled water above the maximum retail price (MRP). The order is in line with the section 36 of Legal Metrology Act, that clearly or...
    swatiposted 2 years 10 months agoread more
  • The union territory (UT) Of Puducherry is, for the most part, enveloped on three sides by the state of Tamil Nadu with the Bay of Bengal framing its eastern face. A total of 84 irrigation tanks--part of the Gingee and Pennaiyar river systems--dot the territory’s landscape.  Recently, the Pud...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 2 years 11 months agoread more
  • Call for Nominations Fourth Edition of FICCI Water Awards December 14, 2016 at FICCI, Federation House, Tansen Marg, New Delhi. Introduction The FICCI Water Awards were launched under the aegis of FICCI Water Mission, to promote awareness, policy advocacy, sharing of best practices and th...
    Water Awards 2016posted 2 years 11 months agoread more
  • The Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) of the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation (MDWS) provides ample information on the physical and financial progress of various programmes and schemes implemented by the government, with certain information made available upto the habitation l...
    meswposted 2 years 11 months agoread more
  • JalSevak Solutions present a feasibility study for implementation of JalSevak greywater recycling system at a tribal students' hostel in rural Maharashtra. We analyse the present conditions, existing water supply infrastructure, possible design of the greywater recycling solution and potential benef...
    JalSevakposted 2 years 11 months agoread more
  • The management of water resources in India has always been a challenge. From the British era till now, the various governments that ruled India have grappled with the fundamental issue of water equity.  To address the water sector issues of the farmers in Maharashtra, the government has adopte...
    makarandpurohitposted 2 years 11 months agoread more
  • River Yamuna, the largest tributary of river Ganga, is the most threatened river system in the country. It faces over abstraction of water and increasing pollution load (municipal and industrial) throughout its course. The river has no worthwhile perennial tributary along its most threatened 600km s...
    swatiposted 2 years 11 months agoread more
  • The demand, supply, availability and access of water resources do not always match. Going by the UN estimates, by the year 2022, India is expected to surpass China's population to become the most populous country in the world. As the population increases, the demand for freshwater goes up; with incr...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 2 years 12 months agoread more
  • The body of Guria Das looked like that of a three-year-old when she passed away at the age of 13. Guria was born in 1999 with a condition that constrained her growth. Her father, Chhatua Das recounts how Guria, unable to speak or move, communicated with him and his wife through gestures; a language ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 years 3 weeks agoread more
  • Malguzari tanks were ponds made for water harvesting by the Malguzaars, who were zamindars or tenants in eastern Vidarbha, Maharashtra two centuries ago.These tanks provided water for irrigation and also increased the availability of fish for local consumption. Before 1950, the Malguzaars construct...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 years 3 weeks agoread more
  • Water crisis is a reality in most of India. After the summer of droughts come the monsoon floods. Take Maharashtra, for instance. If at one time it is desperately searching for drinking water, at another time, its capital, Mumbai is wading through knee-high water. How do we overcome these annual cri...
    Manu Moudgilposted 3 years 1 month agoread more
  • Take the roads of Punjab during the monsoon and you will find most fields turned into pools of water. It’s mainly the water pulled out from the underground vault to support the kharif crop of paddy. Neither a native plant nor suited to the agro-climatic region, paddy has pushed out maize and cotto...
    Manu Moudgilposted 3 years 1 month agoread more
  • At sunrise, everything is luminous but not clear.  ― Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It and Other Stories In September 2015, the BJP-led government in Chhattisgarh decided to put a master plan in place for the development on the Kharun riverfront. To be modelled around the Sabarmati ri...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 years 1 month agoread more
  • Floods grip many parts of the country Heavy downpour in Maharashtra and Rajasthan has caused 10 deaths while thousands have been affected due to floods in Madhya Pradesh and Assam. In Uttarakhand, the water level in Ganga has risen considerably and people have been restricted from stepping dow...
    swatiposted 3 years 1 month agoread more
  • The cracks on the parched land of Bundelkhand are waiting for the monsoon to quench the thirst of its arid landscape. Despite the wide-spread drought here, Pipara, one of the villages in the region, stands apart as the only one that has not run completely dry.  “Only seven-10 percent of vill...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 years 1 month agoread more
  • Rural India walks too far to quench their thirst Going by the 2011 census data, 63 percent of rural India does not have a source of drinking water at home and they walk more than 500m daily to get drinking water. The data has revealed that households in rural Odisha take the longest average walking...
    swatiposted 3 years 2 months agoread more
  • Environment ministry releases the draft of India’s new National Forest Policy The draft of the new National Forest Policy (NFP) has been released by the environment ministry. The new draft proposes to levy green tax that will allow for an ecologically responsible behavior and will also supplement...
    swatiposted 3 years 2 months agoread more
  • Vikram Patel, a 71-year-old farmer in Chidavad village of Dewas district in Madhya Pradesh is one of the first farmers to have embraced the idea of farm ponds to increase the groundwater level in his farm. “For the last two decades, the Chidavad village in the Tonk Khurd block, was one among the ...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 years 2 months agoread more

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Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a riveting new book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, with a foreword by Shiv Vishwanathan, Alternative Futures: India Unshackled covers a wide range of issues, organized under four sections.

February 6, 2018 6:15PM
February 5, 2018 12:00PM

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A remarkable, first-ever collection of 35 essays on India’s future, by a diverse set of authors – activists, researchers, media practitioners.

Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, with a foreword by Shiv Vishwanathan, Alternative Futures: India Unshackled covers a wide range of issues, organized under four sections.

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How do we conserve water so we do not have to face acute shortage in the future?

Water, the most precious commodity is being abused to such an extent that there is fear that this might lead to another world war or it may be difficult even to get drinking water. Water is indeed an integral part of human body as it accounts for 66 percent of it. The only liquid that quenches thirst satisfactorily is water and a mere two percent dehydration reduces performance by 20 percent.

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News this week

Carbon content in India's soil decreases

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Mahaveer Singh Sukarlai was awarded the Bhagirath Prayas Samman at the India Rivers Day 2017 for his valiant effort to safeguard the integrity of the Bandi river in Pali.

A seasonal river in Pali, Rajasthan, the Bandi is nothing short of a sewer. The textile town has witnessed rampant industrial growth, raw sewage discharges and toxic contamination of its waters. The river, which is devoid of lean season flow, is polluted up to 55 km downstream. The river water is unfit for drinking as well as irrigation.

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A study from remote villages in rural Uttarakhand finds that toilet use is influenced by geography, accessibility, availability of infrastructure and occupation of villagers.

“Sometimes I go for open defecation, sometimes I use the toilet. It’s not like I always have to use the toilet. When I go for work here and there, I defecate in the jungle,” says Renu from one of the remote villages in Tehri Garwal district of Uttarakhand when asked why she does not use latrines every day.

Although there is a government-constructed latrine with a water tap that she and her family use when they are at home, she sees no point in coming back home to use the toilet when she goes out to graze animals or to collect firewood a long way into the jungle.

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The villagers of Khalabari are hopeful that the overhead tank being built in the village would make drinking water easily accessible to them.

In the early hours, the villagers of Khalabari, a tribal-dominated village in the Dumuripadar gram panchayat of Koraput district in Odisha step out of their houses for bringing wood and drinking water. The road to the forest where the water is available is rocky. Both women and men walk a few kilometres on the harsh terrain to bring essential commodities needed for their survival. Khalabari, with a population of 186, has 45 households. 

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Policy matters this week

Restructuring of National Rural Drinking Water Programme approved

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A study from rural Maharashtra finds piped water supply does not guarantee safe drinking water. Water treatment, storage and WASH practices influence water quality.

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The theme for the Conclave this year is “Water Use Efficiency: An Imperative for India” to highlight the imperative of water use efficiency in the industry, agriculture and urban contexts

November 28, 2017 10:00AM
November 27, 2017 12:00PM

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