Rural Water

  • Estimates suggest that about 10 million Indians are affected by fluorosis, a sickness associated with the consumption of increased concentrations of fluoride, mostly through water. Bones get weakened due to excessive accumulation of fluoride in them which results in increased hip and wrist fractures...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • National Rural Drinking Water Programme: Targets remain unachieved According to a report by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG), the National Rural Drinking Water Programme has been unable to achieve its target of supplying safe drinking water to all rural habitations, government sc...
    swatiposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • The interstate dispute between Odisha and Chhattisgarh over the Mahanadi's water is an ongoing one and it looks like both the state governments have no interest in finding a long-term solution. It all started with the Chhattisgarh government constructing six barrages on the upstream of the Mahanadi...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • Most of Etawah, a city on the banks of the Yamuna river in Uttar Pradesh, has plenty of stories to share about their favourite leader Daddaji or Mulayam Singh Yadav, one of the former chief ministers of Uttar Pradesh. The area bordering the ravines near Chambal, on the other hand, resounds with tale...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • A resident of Bajankheda village in Ratlam district of Madhya Pradesh, Sitabai Tindor shows her pot full of water to us. A strange red, the water looks unusual. “We have been using this red water for domestic use for the last two decades. Industries in Ratlam has spoilt our land and water. The gov...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • In India, although we have approximately four months of monsoon (which is basically 45 days of effective rainfall), in drought prone areas, there are only 10-15 days of harvestable rain in the entire season. If you don't get enough rain during those days, it's a cause for worry. Given that evaporat...
    priyadposted 1 year 7 months agoread more
  • Long before piped water supply became the norm, groundwater got extracted for use and rivers neglected, stepwells served as a major source of water for people. Victoria Lautman, a senior journalist and a researcher on stepwells writes in an article on Indian stepwells that these water storage struct...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 7 months agoread more
  • A growing demand for water implies the need for an improved understanding of our resources, and the ability to manage that demand in an equitable and sustainable way. Wells, not dams, have been the temples of modern India India is a groundwater economy. At 260 cubic km per year, our country is the...
    priyadposted 1 year 7 months agoread more
  • Delhi’s Jor Bagh metro station is the site of an ongoing photographic exhibition with thought-provoking images and narratives exploring escalating water crises Indian and Nepal Himalayas face. Titled “Pani, Pahar: Waters of the Himalayas”, the exhibition combines contemporary work by photojour...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 9 months agoread more
  • Farhanuddin was just five years old when a pain in his knee began bothering him. It was 2013. Slowly, his legs began to change shape. They got so badly deformed that it began to affect his everyday life. He was gloomy and tired most times and had trouble walking. His parents thought that lengra bhoo...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 9 months agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a new book that dares to imagine what India could be. Published by Authors Upfront, 35 author-activists, researchers and thinkers have drawn upon their experiences to write on alternative political, ecological, economic and sociocultural scenarios that w...
    chicuposted 1 year 9 months agoread more
  • Korba in Chhattisgarh is an industrial area which has a significant number of coal mines and thermal power plants. Fly ash is a byproduct of the thermal power plants and has become a significant problem for the residents of Korba now. More than one lakh metric tonnes of fly ash is generated annually...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 10 months agoread more
  • Kaudikasa is a small village with a population of just 350 people in the Ambagad Chowki block of the Rajnandgaon district in Chhattisgarh. Despite its small size, Kaudikasa village has been in the news for all the wrong reasons. Severe health problems have been reported from the village, thanks to a...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • GoI allocations for the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation is Rs. 22,357 crores For the first time in the last four years, the allocation for the sanitation programme Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) has gone down from Rs 19,248 (RE 2017-18) to Rs 17, 843 crore (2018-2019). Out of this, Rs 15,...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • Every year, thousands of villages in Maharashtra get affected by droughts. Experts say that the reasons for recurrent droughts include a lack of policy framework, technical knowledge and community participation as well as poor implementation of government programmes. Until 1970, the residents of Ka...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 12 months agoread more
  • As part of Bonjour India 2017-2018, the four-months-long, ongoing Indo-French journey celebrating the Indo-French partnership, water-related issues are being highlighted through research, art and debates in cities like Jaipur, Bengaluru, New Delhi, Pondicherry and Kolkata. Encompassi...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 years 4 days agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a riveting new book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, w...
    priyadposted 2 years 3 weeks agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, with a foreword by ...
    priyadposted 2 years 3 weeks agoread more
  • Water, the most precious commodity is being abused to such an extent that there is fear that this might lead to another world war or it may be difficult even to get drinking water. Water is indeed an integral part of human body as it accounts for 66 percent of it. The only liquid that quenches thirs...
    swatiposted 2 years 1 month agoread more
  • Carbon content in India's soil decreases According to a recent report by a consortium of agriculture institutes, out of 350 million hectares of soil in India, 120 million hectares has already turned problematic, that is, either the soil has turned acidic, saline, or alkaline. The carbon content in ...
    swatiposted 2 years 2 months agoread more

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A young college graduate shares his experience working with Tata Trusts in Assam on water issues.

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CHIRAG in Uttarakhand works with communities to revive local springs to achieve water security.

In popular imagination, steeped in consumer culture, the hills are exotic and aesthetically sublime places to find solace away from busy urban life. This kind of imagination conveniently ignores and de-contextualizes the hills and the problems they face today. The Himalayas, often known as the Water Tower of Asia, are revered because many of the world's important rivers originate from them. However, Himalayan states are not untouched by water problems and the overarching effects of climate change, which respect no borders.

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A Future Earth Conference

Opening new frontiers in water system diagnostics and innovative solutions to mitigate the 21st-century global water crisis

September 24, 2019 9:00AM - September 27, 2019 6:00PM
August 31, 2019 12:00PM

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Policy matters this week

Meghalaya's draft water policy gets approval

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But have the crucial schemes received more money than last year? We talk to some experts in the water sector to find out.

Nirmala Sitharaman, Finance Minister alluded to gaon, garib and kisan as the centre of all policies of this government, while announcing a clutch of schemes aimed at the rural and urban poor. Her budget speech last week reiterated the government's commitment to ensuring piped water supply to all households in India.

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An analysis of the new Nal se Jal scheme, promising drinking water to every household in India by 2024.

Water scarcity has a history … and that history is nothing less than the history of government. – Alatout, 2008.

Attempts to privatize water may have increased globally in the recent past, but in more general terms, governments largely control water as in India, where water is a state subject. After all, water is the only life-giving non-substitutable good; hence, controlling water means controlling life, and controlling society at large.

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In the news this week

Monsoon makes slowest progress across India in 12 years (source: Times of India)

Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) records show that this year's monsoon has so far been the slowest progressing monsoon in the past 12 years.

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Policy matters this week

Government to launch rural piped water scheme

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While WOTR’s work has contributed to improving SDG outcomes, what are the learnings from the efforts made by the organisation to map and identify the pathways that have brought about this change?

Sustainable development, still an unfinished agenda

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An analysis of the effectiveness of the Composite Water Management Index as a policy-making tool

INTRODUCTION

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