Rural Water

  • We have just a year to go for Swachh Bharat Mission’s (SBM) deadline of making India open-defecation free (ODF). In the last four years, the government has built 86.08 million toilets (as on September 26, 2018) throughout the country as a part of this flagship programme on providing safe sani...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 12 months 2 days agoread more
  • As per the regional plan 2021 chalked out by the national capital regional planning board in 2005, Bahadurgarh, a small town in Haryana is a part of the Delhi metropolitan area. The town, located in Jhajjar district, is growing at a fast pace. It has, in the last few decades, seen development of ind...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 1 month agoread more
  • Estimates suggest that about 10 million Indians are affected by fluorosis, a sickness associated with the consumption of increased concentrations of fluoride, mostly through water. Bones get weakened due to excessive accumulation of fluoride in them which results in increased hip and wrist fractures...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 1 month agoread more
  • National Rural Drinking Water Programme: Targets remain unachieved According to a report by the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG), the National Rural Drinking Water Programme has been unable to achieve its target of supplying safe drinking water to all rural habitations, government sc...
    swatiposted 1 year 1 month agoread more
  • The interstate dispute between Odisha and Chhattisgarh over the Mahanadi's water is an ongoing one and it looks like both the state governments have no interest in finding a long-term solution. It all started with the Chhattisgarh government constructing six barrages on the upstream of the Mahanadi...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 1 month agoread more
  • Most of Etawah, a city on the banks of the Yamuna river in Uttar Pradesh, has plenty of stories to share about their favourite leader Daddaji or Mulayam Singh Yadav, one of the former chief ministers of Uttar Pradesh. The area bordering the ravines near Chambal, on the other hand, resounds with tale...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 2 months agoread more
  • A resident of Bajankheda village in Ratlam district of Madhya Pradesh, Sitabai Tindor shows her pot full of water to us. A strange red, the water looks unusual. “We have been using this red water for domestic use for the last two decades. Industries in Ratlam has spoilt our land and water. The gov...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 2 months agoread more
  • In India, although we have approximately four months of monsoon (which is basically 45 days of effective rainfall), in drought prone areas, there are only 10-15 days of harvestable rain in the entire season. If you don't get enough rain during those days, it's a cause for worry. Given that evaporat...
    priyadposted 1 year 2 months agoread more
  • Long before piped water supply became the norm, groundwater got extracted for use and rivers neglected, stepwells served as a major source of water for people. Victoria Lautman, a senior journalist and a researcher on stepwells writes in an article on Indian stepwells that these water storage struct...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 2 months agoread more
  • A growing demand for water implies the need for an improved understanding of our resources, and the ability to manage that demand in an equitable and sustainable way. Wells, not dams, have been the temples of modern India India is a groundwater economy. At 260 cubic km per year, our country is the...
    priyadposted 1 year 2 months agoread more
  • Delhi’s Jor Bagh metro station is the site of an ongoing photographic exhibition with thought-provoking images and narratives exploring escalating water crises Indian and Nepal Himalayas face. Titled “Pani, Pahar: Waters of the Himalayas”, the exhibition combines contemporary work by photojour...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • Farhanuddin was just five years old when a pain in his knee began bothering him. It was 2013. Slowly, his legs began to change shape. They got so badly deformed that it began to affect his everyday life. He was gloomy and tired most times and had trouble walking. His parents thought that lengra bhoo...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a new book that dares to imagine what India could be. Published by Authors Upfront, 35 author-activists, researchers and thinkers have drawn upon their experiences to write on alternative political, ecological, economic and sociocultural scenarios that w...
    chicuposted 1 year 5 months agoread more
  • Korba in Chhattisgarh is an industrial area which has a significant number of coal mines and thermal power plants. Fly ash is a byproduct of the thermal power plants and has become a significant problem for the residents of Korba now. More than one lakh metric tonnes of fly ash is generated annually...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 5 months agoread more
  • Kaudikasa is a small village with a population of just 350 people in the Ambagad Chowki block of the Rajnandgaon district in Chhattisgarh. Despite its small size, Kaudikasa village has been in the news for all the wrong reasons. Severe health problems have been reported from the village, thanks to a...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • GoI allocations for the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation is Rs. 22,357 crores For the first time in the last four years, the allocation for the sanitation programme Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) has gone down from Rs 19,248 (RE 2017-18) to Rs 17, 843 crore (2018-2019). Out of this, Rs 15,...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 7 months agoread more
  • Every year, thousands of villages in Maharashtra get affected by droughts. Experts say that the reasons for recurrent droughts include a lack of policy framework, technical knowledge and community participation as well as poor implementation of government programmes. Until 1970, the residents of Ka...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 7 months agoread more
  • As part of Bonjour India 2017-2018, the four-months-long, ongoing Indo-French journey celebrating the Indo-French partnership, water-related issues are being highlighted through research, art and debates in cities like Jaipur, Bengaluru, New Delhi, Pondicherry and Kolkata. Encompassi...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 7 months agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a riveting new book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, w...
    priyadposted 1 year 8 months agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, with a foreword by ...
    priyadposted 1 year 8 months agoread more

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While WOTR’s work has contributed to improving SDG outcomes, what are the learnings from the efforts made by the organisation to map and identify the pathways that have brought about this change?

Sustainable development, still an unfinished agenda

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An analysis of the effectiveness of the Composite Water Management Index as a policy-making tool

INTRODUCTION

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The effects of climate change are felt by the indigenous communities residing in the Himalayan region. How are they coping with these changes?

Mountain ecosystems are highly sensitive due to ecological fragility, geomorphologic instability but are blessed with vast eco biodiversity. Climate change impacts in the form of temperature rise, unpredictable and decreased rainfall, glacier melt, prolonged summers and short winters and changes in the seasonal cycle are happening at a more severe pace in the mountain areas making it more vulnerable to their impacts.

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As India votes this month in the Lok Sabha Elections, WaterAid India takes a look at how water and sanitation are still top of mind for many female voters across the country.

As the world’s largest democracy is all geared for its biggest test - for voters to select their Members of Parliament and the Prime Minister, the top issues that dominate the electoral agenda at the national level have been increased jobs opportunities, controlling inflation, and reducing farmers’ distress. While these could be the top priorities for the rest of India, what dominates the agenda at the local level are every day issues that may seem mundane to many - water and sewage lines.

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A study finds women are hit the hardest during droughts due to food and water scarcity, loss of income and a range of health problems resulting from it.

Droughts are one of the most feared natural calamities impacting agriculture and food production as well as the morale of millions of farmers in India. Recent studies show that the frequency of droughts is increasing. While droughts are known to cause severe rural distress, little is known on how gender influences the experiences of men and women in coping with droughts.

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India is facing a major water crisis and a number of water sector challenges remain unaddressed even today.

India is on the brink of a major water crisis. With drought looming over the southern and western parts of the country, the existing water resources are in peril. Rivers are getting more polluted, their catchments, water-holding and water-harvesting mechanisms are deteriorating and groundwater levels are depleting at an alarming rate.

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Private provision of water services is most successful where the operation and maintenance contracts are offered by the local water users.

India has, over the last 50 years, spent approximately $50 billion on developing water resources and another estimated $7.5 billion on drinking water, with little to show for the money (Devraj 2002). Apart from big dams and irrigation systems, the government has encouraged the digging of millions of tube wells and borewells energised by electric and diesel-driven pumps that now provide half of the country’s irrigation. Still, around 120 million people in India do not have access to safe drinking water, and about 21 percent of all communicable disease in this country are water related.

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News this week

CWC data shows water storage in major river basins depleting

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Compiled by Pankaj Kumar S. and Alok Srivastava, Resource Persons; additional research provided by Ramya Gopalan, Research Associate and Happy Pant, Research Officer
8 September 2006

Original Query: V. Kurian Baby, Socio-Economic Unit Foundation (SEUF), Kerala, Posted: 3 August 2006

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From Arati Davis, Bangalore

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