Rural Water

  • What's not to like about clay pots? "They cool water naturally due to the tiny air pores present in them, are affordable, save energy and are eco-friendly when compared to refrigerators", says Gautam Bandhopadhaya, a water expert in Chhattisgarh. Apart from cooling water, the alkaline clay inte...
    makarandpurohitposted 5 years 2 months agoread more
  • "When I wake up in the morning, I feel like a normal person, but when I get up, I realize that I cannot walk properly. I feel like running but I cannot", laments Md. Manik Uddin. This isn't unique to just Manik. Many others of Tapatjuri village in Nagaon, Assam feel the same. From infants to the eld...
    Usha Dewaniposted 5 years 2 months agoread more
  • Huddled in the Aravali range in the southern part of Rajasthan about 26 km from Udaipur, is the largest reserve of phosphate in India. Also known as the Jhamarkotra mines, it is the only commercially exploitable rock phosphate deposit in the country. Phosphate is crucial for the sustenance of f...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 years 2 months agoread more
  • A small river flows past the village of Teja Rohela in Fazilka district, Punjab, crosses the border a couple of kilometres away, and enters Pakistan. In reality, this 'river' is a drain which takes away the toxic waste of cities located upstream. In that same village, 23 children with...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 2 months agoread more
  • The Shivnath River is the longest tributary of the Mahanadi River. It was the first river in India whose water rights (23.5 km stretch of the Shivnath River in Durg district, Chattisgarh) were sold to a private company Radius Water Limited (RWL) 16 years ago. The Shivnath is the main ...
    makarandpurohitposted 5 years 3 months agoread more
  • Sixty eight percent of India's population lives in rural areas but when it comes to facilities -- including the availability of safe drinking water -- cities and towns corner most of them. Investments to rural India increased from Rs 31,356 crore (2002-07) to Rs 89,150 crore (2007-12) but this ...
    makarandpurohitposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • Workshop on ‘Rainwater Harvesting in Rural Areas’ by RuTAG IIT Bombay and Jalvardhini at Panvel, Maharashtra. For more details on the workshop download the brochure from below. 
    Swati Bansalposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • Vidarbha region in Maharashtra has continued to be in the news over the years because of its severe agrarian crisis with reports of severe droughts, loss of crops and increasing farmer suicides. Relief packages have done very little to solve these problems. The paper titled 'Generating agrarian dyn...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • 596 brick kilns along Ganga's banks are pushing it away from Patna Per records of the Bihar State Pollution Control Board (BSPCB), there are nearly 596 brick kilns along the banks of the Ganga, which are pushing away the river from Patna. This has been reiterated by the technical panel of the State...
    Swati Bansalposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • How did your interest in filming water stories come about? Is there any particular issue on water that has interested you? What has guided your selection? I was into photography earlier and was working with NGOs on developmental issues in rural areas. This is what triggered my interest in water as ...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • What does slashed funding for the water and sanitation sector in this year’s budget mean? Is the government’s claim that the states will get more money because of the latest Finance Commission recommendation, spot on? Sona Mitra and Kanika Kaul of the Centre for Budget and Governance Accountabil...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • Women in bright, colourful clothes carrying pots on their heads -- this is how popular media often depicts the women of rural Rajasthan. This is what I expected to see in the Bakhasar region of Barmer district, which borders the famous salt desert, the Rann of Kutch. The groundwater is often sa...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • Rajendra Singh is the 2015 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate Rajendra Singh, the water man of India, has won accolades for his efforts towards innovative water restoration as well as for improving water security in rural India. The Stockholm Water Prize is a global award presented annually by the Stoc...
    Swati Bansalposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • Madurai, Tamil Nadu's second largest city, is now filled with buildings and roads which are eating into its age old network of tanks and canals. This change did not happen overnight. It began in the late 19th century by the British when they merged several hamlets to establish their headquarter...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • Opposition to the Land Acquisition (Amendment) Bill The controversial Land Acquisition (Amendment) Bill has met with opposition in the Rajya Sabha from Congress, Biju Janta Dal and Telangana Rashtra Samithi. However, the Lok Sabha has passed the Bill with nine amendments and two new claus...
    Swati Bansalposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • With over 620 million defecating in the open in India, do we need a new approach to curb this practice? The force of habit is such that even households with toilets have around forty percent of adults defecating in the open. But, does curbing open defecation necessarily lead to significant improveme...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 years 6 months agoread more
  • Groundwater isn't understood very well, especially in hilly areas where springs seem to appear and vanish of their own accord. However, as science tells us, there's no effect without a cause, and understanding the reason why water flows where it does can ensure optimal use of this natural resource t...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 6 months agoread more
  • Vibrio cholerae is responsible for 100,000 -120,000 deaths annually, worldwide. [1] Commonly found in ponds, rivers and brackish areas, the bacterium finds its way into humans through contaminated food and water. And the result? Cholera. Characterized by severe diarrhea, vomiting and dehydratio...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 5 years 6 months agoread more
  • Santosh Gavale, a resident of Manyali village in Umarkhed tehsil of Yavatmal district, is a happy man now. The village, which has faced an increasing water crisis over the years, is now water sufficient because it manages its water resources well and shares it equitably. Santosh managed to do this f...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 5 years 6 months agoread more
  • Muneswar and more than 170 farmers in Ambikapur, Chhattisgarh have no regrets after shifting over from traditional agricultural methods of farming to the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) method. Why would they? Most of them have been overwhelmed by the kind of returns they have got compared...
    makarandpurohitposted 5 years 6 months agoread more

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A temple trust revives an ancient stepwell, comes to the rescue of a water-starved village.

Long before piped water supply became the norm, groundwater got extracted for use and rivers neglected, stepwells served as a major source of water for people.

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To make access to water adequate and equitable, the focus must shift from water sources to water resources. Science, community participation and cooperation, are key to addressing our water woes.

A growing demand for water implies the need for an improved understanding of our resources, and the ability to manage that demand in an equitable and sustainable way.

Wells, not dams, have been the temples of modern India

India is a groundwater economy. At 260 cubic km per year, our country is the highest user of groundwater in the world - we use 25 percent of all groundwater extracted globally, ahead of USA and China.

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A photo exhibition focuses on the changing lifestyles of local communities in the Himalayas with changes in their environment.

Delhi’s Jor Bagh metro station is the site of an ongoing photographic exhibition with thought-provoking images and narratives exploring escalating water crises Indian and Nepal Himalayas face. Titled “Pani, Pahar: Waters of the Himalayas”, the exhibition combines contemporary work by photojournalist Toby Smith with academic research led by Dr Bhaskar Vira and Dr Eszter Kovacs at Cambridge University’s department of geography, in association with collaborators in India and Nepal.

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Safer water and better nutrition were key in mitigating fluorosis problem in parts of the state.

Farhanuddin was just five years old when a pain in his knee began bothering him. It was 2013. Slowly, his legs began to change shape. They got so badly deformed that it began to affect his everyday life. He was gloomy and tired most times and had trouble walking. His parents thought that lengra bhoot or evil spirit was tormenting them like hundreds of others who were becoming crippled in the village of Tapatjuri in Nagaon district in Assam. Little Farhan could barely eat, wash or take a stroll without assistance.

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The editor of a new book that lays out alternative futures for India discusses India, democracy and development with a noted journalist.

Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a new book that dares to imagine what India could be. Published by Authors Upfront, 35 author-activists, researchers and thinkers have drawn upon their experiences to write on alternative political, ecological, economic and sociocultural scenarios that will benefit India in its surge forward.

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The video tells the story of residents of Korba and nearby villages who are affected by the fly ash from power plants which makes Korba the fifth critically polluted area in the country.

Korba in Chhattisgarh is an industrial area which has a significant number of coal mines and thermal power plants. Fly ash is a byproduct of the thermal power plants and has become a significant problem for the residents of Korba now. More than one lakh metric tonnes of fly ash is generated annually by the eight thermal power plants in Korba in Chhattisgarh which produce 6090 megawatts of electricity.

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Kaudikasa village’s two decades of struggle with arsenic contamination in drinking water ends with a new government scheme.

Kaudikasa is a small village with a population of just 350 people in the Ambagad Chowki block of the Rajnandgaon district in Chhattisgarh. Despite its small size, Kaudikasa village has been in the news for all the wrong reasons. Severe health problems have been reported from the village, thanks to acute arsenic contamination in its groundwater. In fact, of the 22 villages affected by arsenic contamination in Ambagad Chowki block, Kaudikasa village is said to be the worst affected.

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While millions of people in India still wait for their share of water and toilets, this year's budget fails to give them any hope.

GoI allocations for the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation is Rs. 22,357 crores

For the first time in the last four years, the allocation for the sanitation programme Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) has gone down from Rs 19,248 (RE 2017-18) to Rs 17, 843 crore (2018-2019).

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The video tells us the success story of Kakaddara village that won the Satyamev Jayate Water Cup-2017 by efficiently managing its water.

Every year, thousands of villages in Maharashtra get affected by droughts. Experts say that the reasons for recurrent droughts include a lack of policy framework, technical knowledge and community participation as well as poor implementation of government programmes.

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Prof. Frederic Landy, director, French Institute of Pondicherry speaks to India Water Portal on water and socio-environmental challenges.

As part of Bonjour India 2017-2018, the four-months-long, ongoing Indo-French journey celebrating the Indo-French partnership, water-related issues are being highlighted through research, art and debates in cities like Jaipur, Bengaluru, New Delhi, Pondicherry and Kolkata.

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