WaterAid

The report deals with use and user satisfaction with seven communal toilet facilities in Bhopal.

This report published by WaterAid describes the findings of the study conducted in seven poverty pockets in Bhopal to look at patterns of use of communal latrine facilities. Much has been invested in building communal and public toilets and more resources are likely to continue to support this form of sanitation in dense urban areas in India.

However, there is no evidence available that is needed to quantify their potential contribution to reducing open defecation and faecal pollution in these environments, and identify those design features and management factors that encourage the highest usage rates by all household members. Also there is no information available on the impact of age and gender related differences in patterns of use.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This document highlights the poor water and sanitation situation in the urban slums in India, due to rapid urbanisation and increase in the number of slum dwellers in the cities.

This document by WaterAid India, India highlights the poor water and sanitation situation in the urban slums in India, in the context of rapid urbanisation and the increase in the number of slums and slum dwellers in the cities.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This brief report highlights the findings of an evaluation study conducted by WaterAid, India of the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC), in order to eradicate open defecation.

This brief report highlights the findings of an evaluation study conducted by WaterAid, India of the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC), a national programme in India that ensures sanitation facilities in rural areas to eradicate open defecation. The study was conducted in the five states of Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Tripura, Karnataka and Haryana. This document highlights the findings of the evaluation study in the state of Bihar.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This report outlines how over one million people in the country continue to scrape an existence through manual scavenging, forced largely by social convention and caste prejudice.

Burden of inheritance: Can we stop manual scavenging? – A report by Indira Khurana and Toolika Ojha, WaterAid IndiaThis report by WaterAid outlines how over one million people in the country continue to scrape an existence through manual scavenging, forced largely by social convention and caste prejudice, and calls for strong action to eradicate this practice.

A violation of human rights, this discriminatory and demeaning practice was outlawed by the Indian Parliament in 1993 but still continues today. India has missed three deadlines to make the country 'manual-scavenger free'. India's booming cities help keep the practice alive, as there is often little infrastructure for sanitary sewerage and waste disposal systems.

The report tries to seek answers to why this practice continues despite:

  • Availability of other dignified livelihood sources, for the people in this occupation?
  • Other cleaner options for survival existing in cities and towns?
  • Feasible and viable technological alternatives being available to dry toilets, one of the drivers of this occupation?

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This discussion paper from WaterAid India, examines the need and background of the right to water and sanitation (RTWS), in both the global context and in the Indian context.

Understand the RTWS - WAIThe right to water and sanitation is necessary for the enjoyment of other human rights, including the right to life and human dignity, the right to health, the right to adequate food, the right to development and the right to a healthy environment.

This discussion paper from WaterAid India, examines the need and background of the right to water and sanitation (RTWS), in both the global context (using existing International Human Rights conventions) and in the Indian context (using the Indian Constitution).

The paper lays down specific details of what a RTWS would entail, in terms of exact provisions that citizens could be entitled to. It also details the difference between RTWS and water rights, examines the judicial interpretation of such a right, using analysis of past cases related to RTWS.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

A report on the workshop organised by FANSA, FORUM & WaterAid

This report describes the proceedings of a workshop organised on the 5th of August 2009 at New Delhi, by the Freshwater Action Network South Asia (FANSA), the Forum for Policy Dialogue and Water Conflicts in India (FORUM), India WASH Forum and WaterAid.

The crisis of providing safe and affordable drinking water, as well as meeting the water requirements for livelihoods and infrastructure for rural and urban sanitation in India, is becoming acute by the day. In this context, ensuring the right of citizens to drinking water and sanitation, can be an important policy initiative to help improve the overall situation.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Presentations on sustainable sanitation and ecological sanitation

A consultation was organised by Arghyam Trust in September 2009, to share experiences on Sustainable and Ecological Sanitation with the Planning Commission.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The paper presents a situational analysis of the crisis and challenges of drinking water in Bundelkhand in the overall context of the drought spell in 2007

This paper on Bundelkhand from their Water and Sanitation Perspective series of WaterAid presents how ecological degradation and faulty policies make drinking water scarce and less accessible. It is a situational analysis of the crisis and challenges of drinking water in Bundelkhand in the overall context of current drought spell (in 2007). The paper makes a case for giving the issue of drinking water utmost priority in the mainstream agenda of drought management.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The latest issue of WaterDrops focusses on issues of inclusion, including articles on Social exclusion in drinking water and sanitation, caste based discrimination, water as a tool for social control and inclusive approaches in Bihar.

Image and Content Courtesy: WaterAid

WaterAid India's WaterDrops newsletter is published quarterly. WaterDrops is an effort to showcase WaterAid India's work, ideas, issues and concerns with its partners, civil society organisations, international NGOs, UN agencies and other important players in the water and sanitation sector. The latest issue of WaterDrops focusses on issues of inclusion, including articles on Social exclusion in drinking water and sanitation, Caste based discrimination, Water as a tool for social control and Inclusive approaches in Bihar. The latest issue can be downloaded here: WaterDrops Issue - 12

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The conference recognizes sanitation as a basic human right and committment to achieve sanitation-related national and millennium development goals by 2015

The Third South Asia Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN 2008), organised by Government of India, was held in New Delhi, during November 16-21, 2008, with the theme as "Sanitation for Dignity and Health".

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Subscribe to RSS - WaterAid