Shripad Dharmadhikary

About time inland waterways feasibility is reassessed
Serious questions about the dependability of waterways Amita Bhaduri posted 6 months 3 weeks ago

In 2016, 106 rivers or river stretches were declared as national inland waterways, and the development of many of these new waterways along with the already existing ones was prioritized for large scale commercial navigation and shipping.

Dredging in progress on National Waterway-1 (Image: IWAI)
Life, livelihoods, ecosystems, culture: Entitlements and allocation of water for competing uses
The Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India presents a report on water allocation for competing uses. Amita Bhaduri posted 9 years 11 months ago

Water ConflictThis report has been prepared by the members of the working group set up by the Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India on the issue of “Entitlements and allocations for livelihoods and ecosystem needs". The introductory chapter sets out the context of the report. The immediate context is the work of the Forum over the last 4-5 years, and the learning that this particular issue leads to many water conflicts in India.

"Climate change" - Understanding the connections with energy use, and how India's galloping economic growth and insatiable appetite for energy can be balanced with environmental security?
This June 2006 issue of Agenda looks at some of the issues governing climate change and power production. content-team posted 10 years 5 months ago


Agenda magazine June 2006 special issue on the "Climate change"

 

Introduction: Energy versus emissions: The big challenge of the new millennium
By Rakesh Kalshian
To maintain its economic growth rate of 8-10%, India needs all the energy it can get. But the momentum of economic growth overrides crucial environmental concerns.

Hotting up: The science and politics of climate change
By Aditi Sen
The world is hotting up. Climate systems are changing. The 1990s were the hottest decade ever, sea levels rose by 10-20 cm during the 20th century, and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are 31% higher than in 1750.

Mountains of concrete: Dam building in the Himalayas - A report by International Rivers Network
Building several hundered dams on the Himalayas, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Bhutan. What this entails? Aarti Kelkar Khambete posted 11 years 3 months ago

Mountains of concrete - IRN reportThis document by International Rivers Network provides a background for the recent plans initiated by India, Nepal, Pakistan and Bhutan to build several hundred dams on the Himalayan mountains, which store vast amounts of water and with their high slopes and fast moving rivers, present a huge potential for generating hydropower.

India, Nepal, Pakistan and Bhutan have been facing the increasing challenges of meeting their rising elecricity and energy needs and hydropower dams in the Himalayas are being proposed as solutions to meet a considerable part of these requirements.

The document examines the various arguments that have been put forward against the building of the dams as against the proposed advantages that the dams are claimed to have for these four countries, which share common geographical, topographical and eco-climatic features but have starkly different political and economic contexts.

Water: Private, Limited - Issues in privatisation, corporatisation and commercialisation of water sector in India by Manthan Adhyayan Kendra
This book by Manthan Adhyayan Kendra, highlights the emerging issues related to privatisation of water in the context of the recent surge of privatisation-related initiatives in the water sector in India. Aarti Kelkar Khambete posted 11 years 6 months ago

Water Private Limited - ManthanThis book by Manthan Adhyayan Kendra, highlights the emerging issues related to privatisation of water in the context of the recent surge of privatisation-related initiatives in the water sector in India.

The history of attempts at privatisation of water till recent times from all across the globe indicate that they have been met with strong resistance where ever they have been implemented. This is because of the total failure of all these programmes to address the social responsibility of providing water to all without consideration of profits.

However, this backlash against privatisation has led international donor agencies to use a different type of strategy and language. This has led to a shift from Private Sector Partnership (PSP) to Public Private Partnership (PPP) and more recently to the Water Sector Reforms (WSR) in countries such as India.

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