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  • Article and Image courtesy: NASABangladesh typically experiences a mild winter from October to March; a hot, muggy summer from March to June; and a warm, rainy monsoon from June to October. By early July 2011, rains had already transformed northeastern Bangladesh.Click here to read the entire articl...
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  • Sri Lanka’s government stated that the death toll from flooding had risen to 13, and officials were arranging food drops to hardest-hit areas in the east.This color-coded image shows rainfall amounts over Sri Lanka and the Bay of Bengal from January 3–9. The heaviest rainfall appears in dark blu...
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  • Article and Image Courtesy: NASAA new NASA computer modeling effort has found that additional growth of plants and trees in a world with doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide levels would create a new negative feedback – a cooling effect – in the Earth's climate system that could work to reduce fut...
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  • Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured images of flooded Brahmaputra River. Click on the picture or the link below to go to the full story with larger images http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NewImages/images.php3?img_id=17769
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  • (Image taken from the NASA page mentioned below) Several African basins, such as the Congo, Zambezi and Nile, show significant drying over the past five years. In the United States, the Mississippi and Colorado River basins show water storage increases during that time. Such information is vit...
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This article presents stunning satellite images of rising water levels in Bangladesh in 2011

Article and Image courtesy: NASA

Summer monsoon transforms northeastern Bangladesh - Updates from NASA Earth ObservatoryBangladesh typically experiences a mild winter from October to March; a hot, muggy summer from March to June; and a warm, rainy monsoon from June to October. By early July 2011, rains had already transformed northeastern Bangladesh.

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Heavy rains forced 120,000 people out of their homes in Sri Lanka, the Associated Press reported on January 11, 2011.

Sri Lanka’s government stated that the death toll from flooding had risen to 13, and officials were arranging food drops to hardest-hit areas in the east.

Heavy Rains in Sri Lanka

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A new NASA computer modeling effort has found that additional growth of plants and trees in a world with doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide levels would create a new negative feedback – a cooling effect – in the Earth's climate system that could work to reduce future global warming.

Article and Image Courtesy: NASA

A new NASA computer modeling effort has found that additional growth of plants and trees in a world with doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide levels would create a new negative feedback – a cooling effect – in the Earth's climate system that could work to reduce future global warming.

A new NASA modeling effort found that in a doubled-carbon dioxide world plant growth could lessen global warming by about 0.3 degrees C globally. The same model found that the world would warm by 1.94 degrees C without this cooling feedback factored in. Image: Great Smoky Mountains National Park; Credit: National Park Service

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NASA's Earth Observatory website has striking pictures of flooding on Brahmaputra in September, 2007.

Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured images of flooded Brahmaputra River. Click on the picture or the link below to go to the full story with larger images http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Newsroom/NewImages/images.php3?img_id=17769

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Recent space observations of freshwater storage by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (Grace) are providing a new picture of how Earth's most precious natural resource is distributed globally and how it is changing.

(Image taken from the NASA page mentioned below) Several African basins, such as the Congo, Zambezi and Nile, show significant drying over the past five years. In the United States, the Mississippi and Colorado River basins show water storage increases during that time. Such information is vital for managing water resources in vulnerable parts of Africa and Southeast Asia, since increasing populations and standards of living place demands on water resources that are often unsustainable.

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