Isha Ray

Will access to piped water ensure safe water in India?
A study from Maharashtra found that piped water supply did not ensure access to safe water. Intermittent water supply and poor sanitation triggered water contamination and antibiotic resistance. Aarti Kelkar Khambete posted 1 year 5 months ago

While Covid-19 has brought forth the need for better access to water for WASH practices to the forefront, how India plans to bring water at the doorstep through the Jal Jeevan Mission (JJM) continues to be a challenge. This is especially in the context of not only access but also quality of the available water.

Safe drinking water, a major challenges for India (Image Source: IWP Flickr photos)
The effects of continuous versus intermittent piped water supply
While piped water supply is the gold standard, a piped connection does not always mean good quality, quantity and frequency of water delivery. Aarti Kelkar Khambete posted 5 years 11 months ago

Piped water supply has often been referred to as a gold standard while evaluating access to water supply.

Type of water supply and waterborne illnesses, the connection (Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Does 24x7 water supply help reduce water storage or hoarding in urban areas?
A study at Hubli Dharwad found that there could be limits to how formal a city's water supply systems is. These depended on consumer habits, the history of a city’s water supply and infrastructure. Aarti Kelkar Khambete posted 6 years 4 months ago

Urban water supply can be classified into two categories -- formal and informal.  A formal system usually means piped delivery, at least partly treated, and regulated by a utility.

Water, a valuable resource (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Household water delivery options in urban and rural India – A working paper by Stanford Centre for International Development
How can India alleviate its household level drinking water deprivation, in the near-to-medium term, and in cost-effective ways? rajshekar posted 12 years 5 months ago

This working paper by the Stanford Centre for International Development deals with household water delivery options in urban and rural India. The recent potentially far-reaching policy changes frame the paper on drinking water options for urban and rural India.  Given the primacy of drinking water as a national objective, and the policy of decentralization through community ownership, private sector participation and devolution to local governments, it asks: How can India alleviate its household level drinking water deprivation, in the near-to-medium term, and in cost-effective ways?

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