Anupam Mishra

This book by Shri Anupam Mishra documents the life and work of individuals and communities across India, in setting up water harvesting and management systems through talaabs (lakes / tanks).

In Aaj Bhi Khare Hain Talaab, Shri Anupam Mishra documents the life and work of several individuals and communities, across the country, in setting up water harvesting and management systems through talaabs (lakes / tanks).

These traditional water bodies are the lifeline of many villages and towns in the country even today. Their work serves as a guide, in organising to face and tackle the current water crisis in the country.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Delhi was once well-planned along the course of the river Yamuna but it isn't so any more. It can reach a similar state with thoughtful and better urban planning, says Anupam Mishra.

History tells us cities were settled and abandoned several times in Delhi. But I have not come across an explanation for why the city was repeatedly established at the same site. Surely, the presence of the river Yamuna to the east of Delhi would have been a reason. The Yamuna, though is not a small river; it flows for 1,300 km. Once an old city had been abandoned, why weren’t the new cities of Delhi established upstream or downstream of this location?

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The book describes the ideas and principles that lie behind the legacy of conserving water in an environment bereft of this precious natural resource. A review by Rina Mukherjee.

Rainwater harvesting is the new buzzword for a world wracked by climate change and increasingly limited stores of fresh water. But in rain-starved Rajasthan, communities have been harvesting water for ages.

Dr Anupam Mishra’s booklet , “Kund - Etijyomoyer jaler etijyo”,  a Bengali translation of the original in Hindi, describes the ideas and principles that lie behind this legacy of conserving water in an environment bereft of this precious natural resource.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This booklet, Lapodia-ekti drishtanto - is a Bengali translation of the original Hindi publication.

Collective community efforts can help overcome the vagaries of nature and rejuvenate pastures and farms to restore prosperity, says Dr Anupam Mishra in his booklet outlining a case study of Lapodia, a village in Rajasthan. 

The year is 2004. Lapodia is facing another rainless year, one of a cycle of six consecutive years of drought. But unlike other villages in its vicinity, it has managed to conserve its greenery. Lapodia has achieved the impossible by going back to its hoary roots, and nurturing age-old practices.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This book titled “Aajao Pukur Aamader” is the Bengali translation of Anupam Mishra’s book in Hindi “Aaj Bhi Khare Hain Talaab” which has been a runaway success for several years.

cover pageAnupam Mishra is an environmental activist and currently works with the Gandhi Peace Foundation, New Delhi. The inspiring contribution dealing with the indigenous water systems of central India has been translated by Nirupama Adhikari into Bengali.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This is the Bengali translation of Anupam Mishra’s book “Tairne wala samaj doob raha hai” written in the context of the floods in the Kosi river in Bihar in 2004.

cover page

 The second edition of the book came out in 2008 just after the devastating Bihar floods in the year when the river thundered down from the Himalayas on its way to the sea sweeping half of Bihar.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

This film brings into light hard hitting facts centered around water management issues

Source: NDTV

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Do the lyrics have the pull to stop mass migration from this Himalayan village to the cities like Delhi?

Author: Anupam Mishra

"The water in springs of my hills is cool, Do not migrate from this land o my beloved.”

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

An essay by Anupam Mishra written in the context of the floods in Bihar, and examines the various cause & effect facets of the floods

Small and big dams and big embankments were constructed in this region, without understanding the nature of the rivers which have always changed course or overshot their banks. Assuming however, that the river will not change course, the Government adopted a skewed development program - that of building embankments to contain the river. Today, we have realised that these embankments instead of controlling floods, have only caused greater harm.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The article presents a brief about the two essays on the British rule in India, titled "Ek Phirangi Raja" and "Chutki Bhar Namak Paseri Bhar Anyay"

Ek Phirangi RajaEk Phirangi Raja

In this essay, Romesh Bedi recounts the true story of Frederick E Wilson, a British army officer, who deserted the army after the Sepoy Mutiny of 1957, escaped to the Himalayas, and settled in Harsil, a remote village in Uttarakhand on the banks of the Bhagirathi.

Wilson makes a flourishing business from the export of skins, fur, musk from the region, and rips the local deodar forest, to cash in the growing demand for wooden sleepers during the expansion of the Indian railways by the British, which were sent down to the plains through the rivers. Wilson soon acquires a lease from the Raja of Tehri-Garhwal, for his timber business and keeps the Raja happy by giving him a share of the profits, and even begins to mint his own local currency, because of which locals start calling him Raja.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Subscribe to RSS - Anupam Mishra