Sustainability

  • The Madhya Simhastha Maha Kumbh festival, the religious extravaganza that happens once in every 12 years, was held in Ujjain from April 22-May 21, 2016. This year around, the cost to conduct the festival escalated to Rs 5000 crores; more than 15 times the cost incurred for the previous Simhastha hel...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 years 11 months agoread more
  • It would not be an exaggeration to say Subarnarekha (Line of gold) is a film that left an indelible mark on Indian cinema. The film, by Ritwik Ghatak, is inspired by a river by the same name and narrates the reality around the river which flows through the present day Jharkhand, West Bengal and Odis...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 years 12 months agoread more
  • ‘Jat’ reservation and the rampage on a canal For over a month in early 2016, Delhi and Haryana thrashed around, trying to deal with the mess created after Jat protestors demanding reservation for the community in Haryana, caused a 200 feet breach on the Munak Canal near Sone...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 1 week agoread more
  • The International RiverFoundation is looking for new ideas, research and developments in rivers, water and environment for its 19th International Riversymposium to be held in New Delhi from 12-14 September, 2016.  The topics for 2016 are:  Managing large river basins for shared be...
    swatiposted 4 years 3 weeks agoread more
  • Since India became independent in 1947, the central and state governments have introduced various rural development schemes, and have been trying to get them to converge. While this effort hasn't been as impactful on a large scale, there are some success stories. Sarda Panchayat in Sambalpur, Odisha...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 1 month agoread more
  • Chirimiri Coalfield is a part of Central India Coalfields, located in Koriya district, Chhattisgarh. It is spread over 125 square kilometres with estimated total reserves of around 312.11 million tonnes. In the last 70 years, more than 250 springs that used to be the primary sources of dri...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 1 month agoread more
  • The goal of securing universal access to safe drinking water continues to be elusive for India inspite of the impressive strides made in the current years. The working paper titled 'Unravelling rural India’s enduring water indigence: Framing the questions, issues, options and opportunities' publis...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 2 months agoread more
  • South India's rivers are rain-fed unlike those in the North, which are glacier-fed due to the contrasting topography and climate. Unlike the Himalayan system, many of India’s peninsular rivers dry up during the hotter half of the year, leaving lips and fields equally parched. As cities and towns f...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 4 years 2 months agoread more
  • Punjab-Haryana at crossroads over the controversial Sutlej-Yamuna canal Not ready to share its river waters, the Punjab Assembly has adopted a resolution against the construction of the Sutlej Yamuna Link (SYL) Canal that was conceived 30 years back. Also, the State Government has given its nod to ...
    swatiposted 4 years 2 months agoread more
  • In January 2016, the Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) Employees Union and residents of Nagpur yet again protested the privatisation of water services in the city. They demanded the remunicipalisation of their water services since the tall claims made by private operator Veolia Water (Ind...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 2 months agoread more
  • The Ujjain Simhastha (Kumbh Mela) in Madhya Pradesh will begin on April 22, 2016 and go on for a month. The event, held once every 12 years, holds religious significance to Hindus, and throngs of people--approximately 5 crore over the month--take a holy dip in the Kshipra river during this time...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • The Ujjain Simhastha Kumbh Mahaparva is one of the four Kumbha Melas, which is held once in 12 years. Around 5 crore pilgrims are expected to take a holy dip in the Kshipra river at Ujjain between April 22 and May 21, 2016. In 2005, the government assigned the responsibility of organi...
    makarandpurohitposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • The East Coast of India is very much unlike its western counterpart both in terms of physiography and climatology. Unlike the West Coast which receives a predictable amount of rainfall within a predictable time frame, the East Coast is entirely dependent on the depressions in the Bay of Bengal to br...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • About the event: The three day conference is being organised by National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), Nagpur, and Ecosan Services Foundation (ESF), Pune.  The strategic objectives of the Conference are to exchange knowledge, technologies, guidelines and tool...
    swatiposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • While the WatSan sector has been prioritised in the country’s policy agenda through the launch of the Swachh Bharat Mission, last year’s budgetary outlay was way below desired levels. The Ministry of Finance had organised a pre-budget consultation with the social sector organisations o...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 3 months agoread more
  • Aiming for an outcome-oriented programme, Government sets ambitious targets for MGNREGS The Rural Development Ministry is all set to add 1 million farm ponds and wells and another million vermi composting farms in the next two years under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Generation Sche...
    swatiposted 4 years 4 months agoread more
  • Delhi, home to 16.75 million people, is in the grip of a major water crisis. Statistics by the Delhi Jal Board for the year 2011 suggest that the water deficit stands at about 250 million gallons per day with the supply being 830 million gallons per day. Unaccounted for water--the gap between t...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 4 months agoread more
  • Background: In light of the recent increased political and civil efforts to accelerate sanitation provision in India, the SuSanA secretariat has set-up its first regional chapter for India. The SuSanA India chapter is an open and inclusive contribution to the government-led effort towards more sust...
    swatiposted 4 years 4 months agoread more
  • About the conference: The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) in association with the Ministry of Water Resources River Development and Ganga Rejuvenation, Government of India, is organizing the 3rd India Water Forum (IWF), an international water convention from 20th – 22nd April, 2016, at Indi...
    swatiposted 4 years 4 months agoread more
  • Bamboo trees bloomed with long wispy spikes weighing heavy on the stalks. While it might've made for a pretty picture, Loknath Nauri knew it would be a tough year. “More the density of the flowers, the more severe the drought we face,” he says. This was in March 2015 in the forests of southern O...
    Manu Moudgilposted 4 years 4 months agoread more

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There are many reasons why we see more droughts in India these days. Here is all the information that you need to know droughts better.

Droughts are one of the most feared natural calamities in India impacting food production, the economy as well as the morale of millions of farmers in a country where

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Once abundant with water, Sikri village is fighting a losing battle to meet its water needs.

Sikri is a small village that lies 65 km north-west of Bharatpur on the Alwar road. The village used to depend on a traditional irrigation system that assured water throughout the year. A local saying related to the water availability at Sikri goes thus: Lakh daal le chittri, jay rahoongi Sikri (You may put lakhs of fetters to stop it, but the waters will still reach Sikri). This saying has lost its sheen today as the village is now finding itself in the centre of a struggle for water among farmers.

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A study finds that only over a third of human-dominated catchments in India are resilient to climate warming.

The impact of global warming on the hydrological cycle should be of paramount concern to all because global warming affects rainfall patterns in various ways like triggering more extreme rainfall events. Unpredictable changes in runoff make it difficult to plan infrastructure to manage water resources such as dams.

How do human disturbances affect hydrological resilience of catchments in a warming climate?

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The polluted Erai river needs to be restored before it completely dies and leaves the people dependent on it searching for drinking water.

The Erai river, the main tributary of the Wardha river, is the lifeline for the people of Chandrapur in Maharashtra. It primarily supplies water to the Chandrapur city and Chandrapur super thermal power station (CSTPS). Since 1984, after the initiation of operations of M/s CSTPS and Western Coalfields Limited (WCL), the river has begun to get polluted and is now gasping for breath.

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The latest addition to India’s interstate river water conflicts, the Mahanadi will soon go water deficit if Odisha and Chhattisgarh don’t control their hunger for coal-fired power.

A new study, Mahanadi: Coal Rich, Water-Stressed sheds light on how both Odisha and Chhattisgarh have locked horns over the distribution of waters of the Mahanadi river. The 851-km-long river originates in the Dhamtari district of Chhattisgarh, flows through the state and then Odisha before joining the Bay of Bengal at Odisha’s coast.

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A study finds drinking water in peri-urban areas around Bengaluru has high levels of bacteriological and chemical contaminants making it unfit for consumption.

India is running out of water fast. As if this is not bad news enough, it has been found that even the available water is highly polluted with organic and hazardous pollutants. Infact, a recent Water Aid report finds that India is among the top countries with the worst access to clean water close to homes.

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While potable water dispensing units provided under WASH has come as a boon to Kalikapur slum residents, they struggle to meet other water needs due to lack of piped water.

Basanti Haldar (45) has been living in a slum at Kalikapur in Kolkata for over two decades. She works as a domestic help in an upscale locality in the neighbourhood. She is happy nowadays due to an increase in her income. 

The installation of Automated Dispensing Units (ADU) has not only provided her with clean potable water but have also saved her from the cumbersome job of standing in long serpentine queues for a bucket of water. She has time for more work that has also helped her earn better. 

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Farmer Thangavel tastes success with date farming in the drought-prone region of Vidarbha.

In a drought-prone region like Vidarbha in Maharashtra, mostly in the news for water scarcity and farmer suicide, it is not every day that you hear the success story of a farmer. That's why the story of Savi Thangavel, 69, a resident of Mohegaon village which is just 22 km from Nagpur, is special. He took up date farming when nobody even thought about it and became the first successful date farmer in the region.

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A CAG audit finds out an ineffective implementation of rural drinking water schemes in Odisha with the least covered and quality-affected habitations ignored.

On March 16, 2017, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India began a performance audit of the National Rural Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP) by discussing with the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation the scope and methodology of the performance audit. Records relating to the implementation of the programme in 27 states for the five-year period (2012 to 2017) were examined.

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The CAG’s performance audit on Rajasthan observes various deficiencies in the implementation of drinking water supply schemes.

On March 16, 2017, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India began a performance audit of the National Rural Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP) by discussing with the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation the scope and methodology of the performance audit. Records relating to the implementation of the programme in 27 states for the five-year period (2012 to 2017) were examined.

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