Rural Water

  • Deltas sinking, thanks to damsMajor Indian deltas like the Ganga-Brahmaputra and the Krishna-Godavari are sinking because of proliferation of large dams that starve deltas of sediment, groundwater mining that causes land compaction and artificial embankments that affect river coursesPolitical partie...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Water hardly an agenda for politiciansTwo of the three main political parties in fray for the Parliamentary elections, the Congress and the BJP, have just paid lip service to water conservation, while the AAP is atleast talking about Gram Sabhas holding decision making powers for water projectsPiped...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Piped water only for 40% of the middle classOnly 15% of the middle class, households with an annual income above Rs. 88,800, get about three hours of water supply says the latest data from National Council for Applied Economic ResearchLow rainfall in Western Ghats means less water for citiesRainfall...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Gujarat among the most water-starved states in India: UNAccording to the UN World Water Development Report 2014, Gujarat is one of most water-starved states in the country. The prime reason for the water scarcity in Gujarat is groundwater delpletion owing to the unsustainable use of water for agricu...
    swatiposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • No toilets for 52% Delhi slum kidsOpen defecation and lack of drinking water in the slums of Delhi leads to frequent instances of water-borne diseases, says a study conducted by the NGO Child Relief and YouDams contribute to climate change: IPCCThe working group report of the Intergovernmental Panel...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Delhi prone to floods: IPCCThe Yamuna River floodplains need to be kept free as buffer zones to absorb the damage due to extreme weather events, says the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The report also says Mumbai and Kolkata prone to coastal floodingPower everywhere ...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • People from all walks of life, villagers, NGOs, govt officials and water experts participated in the World Water Day celebration in Mewat that was organised by the S M Sehgal Foundation, a rural development NGO working in the district.Mewat is a dry region, thanks to absence of surface water, increa...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Himalayan glaciers could lose two-third mass by 2100The International Panel on Climate Change says this may hit India’s food security system andalso bring changes in the monsoon pattern. Famine, water shortage and regional conflicts are also expected in South Asia, especially IndiaWater in Ludhian...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Abolish manual scavenging: SCThe Court said entering sewer lines without safety gears should be made a crime and that safai karamchari women should be provided support for dignified livelihoodSow short duration crops: GovtThe Union Agriculture Ministry has suggested farmers sow short and medium dura...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Thermal power plants India's biggest water guzzling industryMost of the older generation thermal plants in India use open loop–wet cooling systems which accounts for 40-80 times more water use than the world average. These plants constitute 88% of the total industrial water demand in the countryIn...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • India will be the hotspot of water crisis by 2025: UNThe United Nation's report on the World Water Day talks about conflicts between India and its neighbouring countries over river water sharing.  Areas of conflict might include Ganga-Brahamputra basin and the Indus and Mekong river basins, say...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • HC issues notice to Indian Railways over poor quality waterDelhi High Court has issued notice to the Central Government for supplying poor quality water to railway passengers and staff living in railway colonies. The High Court has sought improvements in the quality of drinking water in Indian Railw...
    swatiposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • “Water flows humbly to the lowest level. Nothing is weaker than water, yet for overcoming what is hard and strong, nothing surpasses it.”– Lao TzuAt a time when many predict that water could be the cause of the Third World War, there is a small oasis of hope tucked away in the hills of Nagalan...
    Usha Dewaniposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • South India has a rich tradition of tanks with the three southern states of Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh contributing to close to 92% of the total irrigation by tanks in the 1970s. Two decades later, this number dwindled to close to 53%. A decade after that, in 2001, the total contributi...
    Seethaposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Kalwaheri is a village of over thousand households comprising mostly of small farmers and landless people tucked away in Karnal, Haryana. The district, once the birth place of the Green Revolution, is now far from green. The application of modern techniques of agriculture and the introduction of hig...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Mile after mile of saline lands line the Delhi-Rohtak-Bhiwani stretch of the highway. Here, the land wasn't always saline, it became that way thanks to canal irrigation. Farmers have used extensive surface water, which has led to an increase in groundwater levels. This leads to the twin problem of w...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • The Water and energy nexusA report released by the United Nations in Tokyo this World Water Day says places where people do not have adequate access to water largely coincide with those where people have no electric powerNGT demands report on fluorosis in Maharashtra12 districts in the state are aff...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • Bombay HC orders ban on wetland reclamationThe Court ordered the ban in the whole of Maharashtra in response to a petition filed by NGO Vanshakti for saving wetlands and for setting up wetlands authority to monitor violations. The Court also directed the authorities to submit an 'action-taken report...
    ravleenposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • As a run up to World Water Day 2014, India Water Portal conducted a Grassroots Comics workshop with Field Facilitators, Barefoot Engineers and other field workers of the Dhara Vikas Programme. The Programme is an initiative of the Government of Sikkim through its Rural Management and Development Dep...
    Usha Dewaniposted 5 years 8 months agoread more
  • National Highway 10 passes through Badophal, a village in Fatehabad district of Haryana. The highway is lined by a tiny market and a point where several jeeps start and terminate. These jeeps are headed to Gorakhpur village, some 15 kms away via Kajal Heri, another village en route. Hordes of resear...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 years 8 months agoread more

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December 14, 2016 9:30AM

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The data on MDWS available through IMIS is inaccurate which could affect evidence-based policy making.

The Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) of the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation (MDWS) provides ample information on the physical and financial progress of various programmes and schemes implemented by the government, with certain information made available upto the habitation level. This type of an information system is crucial to monitor and evaluate the various schemes being implemented.

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A study on greywater recycling solution for toilets done at a hostel for tribal students in Maharashtra shows significant improvement in sanitation and cleanliness.

JalSevak Solutions present a feasibility study for implementation of JalSevak greywater recycling system at a tribal students' hostel in rural Maharashtra. We analyse the present conditions, existing water supply infrastructure, possible design of the greywater recycling solution and potential benefits.

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How can we regulate water resources in an equitable way? Expert Pradeep Purandare speaks to India Water Portal.

The management of water resources in India has always been a challenge. From the British era till now, the various governments that ruled India have grappled with the fundamental issue of water equity. 

To address the water sector issues of the farmers in Maharashtra, the government has adopted Maharashtra State Water Policy, 2003 and has passed the following nine irrigation-related enactments:

1.Maharashtra Irrigation Act, 1976. 

2.Mahrashtra Krishna Vally Irrigation Development Corporation Act, 1996

3.Tapi Irrigation Development Corporation Act,1997

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The Somb-Thapana catchment is a stark contrast to the polluted Yamuna. Knowledge from the Thames and the local communities revived the water.

River Yamuna, the largest tributary of river Ganga, is the most threatened river system in the country. It faces over abstraction of water and increasing pollution load (municipal and industrial) throughout its course. The river has no worthwhile perennial tributary along its most threatened 600km stretch--from Hathnikund (Haryana) to Etawah (Uttar Pradesh)--where it is revived after meeting with river Chambal. The Somb-Thapana catchment is a tributary feeding the Yamuna.

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There is a new technology available now to reuse domestic and industrial refuse. This could just be the solution to India’s increasing water problem.

The demand, supply, availability and access of water resources do not always match. Going by the UN estimates, by the year 2022, India is expected to surpass China's population to become the most populous country in the world. As the population increases, the demand for freshwater goes up; with increased usage, the quantum of waste produced increases as well. Changes in land-use patterns, climatic variabilities and diminished efficiency to use resources only strain the available reserves further.

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Villagers of Jadugoda say radiation from uranium mines is impairing their children. It’s high time the government took measures against it so a generation is not left crippled.

The body of Guria Das looked like that of a three-year-old when she passed away at the age of 13. Guria was born in 1999 with a condition that constrained her growth. Her father, Chhatua Das recounts how Guria, unable to speak or move, communicated with him and his wife through gestures; a language that only the three of them could comprehend. Born in Jadugoda, in Purbi Singhbhum district in Jharkhand, Guria was one of the many children who succumbed to the health complications from excessive radiation from the uranium mines.

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Caught between Malguzaars and the state government, the Malguzari tanks were left to die many years ago. A lone man spearheaded their revival in 2008.

Malguzari tanks were ponds made for water harvesting by the Malguzaars, who were zamindars or tenants in eastern Vidarbha, Maharashtra two centuries ago.These tanks provided water for irrigation and also increased the availability of fish for local consumption.

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An NGO’s effort to recharge the groundwater in an area finds little success with water-guzzling crops that rule the market.

Water crisis is a reality in most of India. After the summer of droughts come the monsoon floods. Take Maharashtra, for instance. If at one time it is desperately searching for drinking water, at another time, its capital, Mumbai is wading through knee-high water. How do we overcome these annual crises? Unfortunately, the answers are not so easy to find. 

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How paddy grew in popularity in Punjab and continues to steal the show, thanks to lack of alternatives for farmers.

Take the roads of Punjab during the monsoon and you will find most fields turned into pools of water. It’s mainly the water pulled out from the underground vault to support the kharif crop of paddy. Neither a native plant nor suited to the agro-climatic region, paddy has pushed out maize and cotton, which were common in the pre-green revolution era. From 2,27,000 hectares in 1960, the area under paddy rose to 26,12000 hectares by the year 2000. A growth rate of 1,050 percent!

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