Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a simple method by which rainfall is collected for future usage. The collected rainwater may be stored, utilised in different ways or directly used for recharge purposes. With depleting groundwater levels and fluctuating climate conditions, RWH can go a long way to help mitigate these effects. Capturing the rainwater can help recharge local aquifers, reduce urban flooding and most importantly ensure water availability in water-scarce zones. Though the term seems to have picked up greater visibility in the last few years, it was, and is even today, a traditional practice followed in rural India. Some ancient rainwater harvesting methods followed in India include madakas, ahar pynes, surangas, taankas and many more.

This water conservation method can be easily practiced in individual homes, apartments, parks, offices and temples too, across the world. Farmers have recharged their dry borewells, created water banks in drought areas, greened their farms, increased sustainability of their water resources and even created a river. Technical know how for the rooftop RWH with direct storage can be availed for better implementation. RWH An effective method in water scarce times, it is also an easily doable practice. Practical advice is available in books written by Indukanth Ragade & Shree Padre, talks by Anupam Mishra and other easy to follow fun ways

Read our FAQ on Rainwater Harvesting and have many basic questions answered.

Featured Articles
December 27, 2019 This compendium by Dr Mihir Kumar Maitra answers all questions that will be of great use to practitioners engaged in both engineering and management aspects of watershed management in the field.
December 4, 2019 The 2015­-2018 drought, the longest, but less severe of droughts experienced by India raises alarm on the negative effects of future droughts on water security in the country.
November 18, 2019 Bangalore's water utility is understaffed, under financed and unable to service the city's water needs.
October 25, 2019 Groundwater use has doubled in Pune. Comprehensive mapping of groundwater resources and better management and governance is the need of the hour.
October 1, 2019 Deconstructing the traditional narrow engineering based policy discourses around floods and droughts and connecting them to social and cultural realities is the need of the hour in India.
September 30, 2019 The recently concluded 4 day conference in Bangalore looked at the current state of global water resource challenges & future pathways to achieve the SDGs, while ensuring equity in access to all.
Citizen Matters looks at what the city should do to manage its water better.
priyad posted 2 years 6 months ago
Policy matters this week
seetha@indiawa… posted 2 years 6 months ago
There are various reasons why India’s small and marginal farmers are unhappy.
Anonymous (not verified) posted 2 years 7 months ago
Policy matters this week
seetha@indiawa… posted 2 years 7 months ago
News this week
seetha@indiawa… posted 2 years 7 months ago
While millions of people in India still wait for their share of water and toilets, this year's budget fails to give them any hope.
Amita Bhaduri posted 2 years 8 months ago
The video tells us the success story of Kakaddara village that won the Satyamev Jayate Water Cup-2017 by efficiently managing its water.
makarandpurohit posted 2 years 8 months ago
An innovative project makes rainwater harvesting easier and more effective in certain areas of Mewat village with increased groundwater salinity.
Amita Bhaduri posted 2 years 8 months ago
Sustainable agro-ecological farming is one way to overcome the limitations of conventional farming. Green College shows us how to do it.
Amita Bhaduri posted 2 years 9 months ago
The book is a collection of 35 essays containing dreams, visions, and pathways of reaching a just and sustainable India.
priyad posted 2 years 9 months ago