Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a simple method by which rainfall is collected for future usage. The collected rainwater may be stored, utilised in different ways or directly used for recharge purposes. With depleting groundwater levels and fluctuating climate conditions, RWH can go a long way to help mitigate these effects. Capturing the rainwater can help recharge local aquifers, reduce urban flooding and most importantly ensure water availability in water-scarce zones. Though the term seems to have picked up greater visibility in the last few years, it was, and is even today, a traditional practice followed in rural India. Some ancient rainwater harvesting methods followed in India include madakas, ahar pynes, surangas, taankas and many more.

This water conservation method can be easily practiced in individual homes, apartments, parks, offices and temples too, across the world. Farmers have recharged their dry borewells, created water banks in drought areas, greened their farms, increased sustainability of their water resources and even created a river. Technical know how for the rooftop RWH with direct storage can be availed for better implementation. RWH An effective method in water scarce times, it is also an easily doable practice. Practical advice is available in books written by Indukanth Ragade & Shree Padre, talks by Anupam Mishra and other easy to follow fun ways

Read our FAQ on Rainwater Harvesting and have many basic questions answered.

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This document is a collection of case studies on ways to ameliorate water scarcity in rural Gujarat by Sir Ratan Tata Trust and the Navajbai Ratan Tata Trust. It provides first-hand accounts of how water programmes impact lives of hundreds and thousands of villagers. The solutions to deal with water scarcity include the promotion of rainwater harvesting (RWH), groundwater replenishment and drip irrigation.

This document is by journalist Suhit Kelkar on behalf of Sir Ratan Tata Trust and the Navajbai Ratan Tata Trust. It is a collection of case studies on ways to ameliorate water scarcity in rural Gujarat.

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Manmohan Singh laments on how farmers have little incentive to conserve groundwater, in spite of practices such as drip irrigation that reduce water consumption.This and other week's news.

PM expresses grave concern on depleting groundwater levels

Manmohan Singh expresses grave concerns on depleting groundwater levels while speaking on the urgent need to focus attention on water conservation and water efficiency. He lamented on how farmers have little incentive to conserve groundwater. Even though practices such as drip irrigation vastly reduce water consumption, the capital costs are high and hence deter investments.

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IWWA Logo

March 9, 2013 9:30AM - March 10, 2013 5:30PM

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A video featuring an eco resort in Bangalore that is self sustaining and environment friendly built with zero waste attitude.

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This report talks of the successes and challenges in fulfilling the endeavour of moving towards self reliance and access to safe drinking water and securing sanitation in north Bihar, the areas of concern and shortcomings, and acknowledges the missing links to find the way forward.


Megh Pyne Abhiyan

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In this paper Dr Mihir Shah speaks on the need for this change, the process followed, the main features of this proposed change and the way forward from here.

A fundamental change in the principles, approach and strategies of water management in India has been proposed in the Twelfth Plan

Why is this paradigm shift needed ?

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A roundup of the week's news ranging from mining in Meghalaya to using landfill to construct railway platforms

Udupi in Karnataka, sets standard for water management

Udupi in coastal Karnataka had an old and leaking water supply infrastructure, sourcing water from myriad open wells apart from borewells. Today it leads the way by pumping river water to reservoirs which, in turn, feeds overhead tanks by gravity, thereby providing over 60 per cent of the town’s households daily water supply, reducing leakages and improving collections.

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Groundwater is our main source of water for domestic, agriculture and industrial use today and through base flows, it also maintains the flow in many of our rivers

It is therefore crucial that we look after this resource and ensure that it is managed properly.Over reliance on groundwater for both domestic and commercial purposes has led to over-exploitation and contamination of groundwater. In order to make groundwater sustainable, there is a need to understand the aquifer characteristics as well as its overall geological setting. This understanding will help in:

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An innovative and fun way to learn more on saving rainwater


Lets catch the rain

 

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A compilation by Andhra Pradesh State Groundwater Department & Central Groundwater Board gives details of volumetric data on the groundwater resources and its uses for the year 2007-08.

The data is categorised into watershed wise (basin-wise) annual availability of groundwater, current draft (utilisation), allocation for domestic and industrial needs, availability for future use (or the balance) and categorisation based on stage of development and rigorous statistical treatment of water levels. It also gives mandal wise resources, which are apportioned and derived from the watershed assessment.

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