Quality, Standards and Testing

Water needed for human consumption, industrial purposes or other requirements must cater to certain minimum standards. The quality of any water is defined by its physical and chemical properties (characteristics). Physical properties include its appearance (colour, clarity and odour, perhaps also its taste) while the chemical properties refer to the constituents dissolved in it. Some of the physical properties are measurable and can be expressed in units of measurement while others like appearance, odour or taste are clearly subjective. However, all the chemical constituents can be measured accurately.

Drinking water must meet certain quality standards to safeguard the health of the people. The permissible and desirable limits of various parameters in drinking water have been detailed as per the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) standard specifications for potable water. These parameters are included in BIS-10500-1991. The various parameters covered include colour, odour, pH, total dissolved solids, hardness, alkalinity, elemental compounds such as iron, manganese, sulphate, nitrate, chloride, fluoride, arsenic, chromium, copper, cyanide, lead, mercury, zinc and coliform bacteria. The tolerance limits for inland surface waters for various classes of water use have been published by the Central Water Commission. Per ISI-IS: 2296-1982, the tolerance limits of parameters are specified as per classified use of water depending on various uses of water ranging from Class A to Class E.

What does the water that one drinks contain, what substances are dissolved in it and what are their safe limits? What are the issues that affect water quality? For more detailed information on all this, please read our FAQs on Rules, Regulations & Standards concerning water and Equipments used to measure water quality and quantity

  • Environment ministry announces new strategy to revive major river water systems The environment ministry has announced a new strategy for the conservation and rejuvenation of major river water systems. As per the ministry, the present strategy for conservation of rivers is limited to tackling pollu...
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  • India among bottom performers in global Environmental Performance Index  As per the latest global Environmental Performance Index (EPI), India is ranked among the bottom five performers. The reason behind slipping from the 141st position two years ago to 177th position this year is poor handli...
    swatiposted 1 year 3 months agoread more
  • River Mutha, the pride of Pune, lovingly called 'Muthai' or 'mother Mutha', is dying a slow death, thanks to the rapidly urbanising city which is depositing huge amounts of untreated sewage and dirt in its waters. Mutha originates at a village named Vegare, in the Western Ghats, about 45 km to the ...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 1 year 3 months agoread more
  • Conduct intensive survey of western UP rivers: NGT The National Green Tribunal has directed for an intensive survey of the Kali, Krishna and Hindon rivers in western Uttar Pradesh. The tribunal has also ordered inspection of 316 industries which are allegedly polluting the water bodies. A committee...
    swatiposted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • Bellandur lake catches fire again A huge fire broke out in the highly polluted Bellandur lake last week, causing worry to Bengaluru residents. A strong contingent of 5,000 army jawans doused the fire in the lake. Soon after the incident, the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board blamed the defenc...
    swatiposted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • The paper seeks to take one step forward in the direction of better water data, by highlighting currently available data relevant to water resources management, generated from remote sensing sources, government, citizens and other relevant global meteorological data. The idea for this paper arose fr...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a riveting new book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, w...
    priyadposted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • Four new research and development projects for real-time monitoring of air and water quality were today launched jointly by the Department of Science and Technology (DST) and Corporate Research Council of Intel. Among the proposed projects is an air quality monitoring test bed that would be able to...
    arathiposted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • Government approves Rs 5,369 crore for Jal Vikas Marg Project With the technical assistance and investment support from the World Bank, the Centre has given its approval to Rs 5,369 crore Jal Vikas Marg Project for capacity augmentation of navigation on the Haldia-Varanasi stretch of National ...
    swatiposted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • Hotels, industries, ashrams polluting the Ganga to be sealed The Uttarakhand high court has asked the state government and the district magistrates of all 13 districts to “identify” and “seal” the industries, hotels, ashrams etc, that are releasing untreated sewage into the Ganga and its tr...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 1 year 4 months agoread more
  • A seasonal river in Pali, Rajasthan, the Bandi is nothing short of a sewer. The textile town has witnessed rampant industrial growth, raw sewage discharges and toxic contamination of its waters. The river, which is devoid of lean season flow, is polluted up to 55 km downstream. The river water is un...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 5 months agoread more
  • “Sometimes I go for open defecation, sometimes I use the toilet. It’s not like I always have to use the toilet. When I go for work here and there, I defecate in the jungle,” says Renu from one of the remote villages in Tehri Garwal district of Uttarakhand when asked why she does not use latrin...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • In the early hours, the villagers of Khalabari, a tribal-dominated village in the Dumuripadar gram panchayat of Koraput district in Odisha step out of their houses for bringing wood and drinking water. The road to the forest where the water is available is rocky. Both women and men walk a few kilome...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • Yet again, North India shrouded in heavy smog Delhi and parts of north India are once again enveloped in heavy toxic smog, thanks to crop burning in Punjab. Taking note of the crisis, the National Green Tribunal has rapped the state governments concerned and has instructed them to ta...
    swatiposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • Urmila Devi lives in Chaitabazaar village which is barely five kilometres from the eastern bank of the Burhi Gandak river. It is located in a particularly flood-prone area of East Champaran in north Bihar. The drinking water quality in this area is poor. The recurrent floods only make it w...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • Concerned with contaminated water sources in rural areas, the Centre plans to provide piped water supply (classified as an improved water source by the WHO & UNICEF Joint Monitoring Report) to 80 percent rural households in the country by 2022. Better access to drinking water is certainly good n...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • The theme for the Conclave this year is “Water Use Efficiency: An Imperative for India” to highlight the imperative of water use efficiency in the industry, agriculture and urban contexts.  The Indian economy at present is struggling with excessive population growth and changing water reso...
    Water Awards 2016posted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • Study says 40 percent of NCR's water bodies lost to urbanisation in 42 years As per a study conducted by IIT Delhi, nearly 40 percent of water bodies in the national capital region (NCR) has disappeared between 1972 and 2014 due to rapid urbanisation. The study also revealed that due...
    swatiposted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • Hello, I am looking for CPCB guidelines for acceptable water quality from an STP for usage in: irrigation, disposal into a storm water drain, and drinking. I could not find on their website. Can anyone help? Thanks, Parag Mody Goa
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 1 year 6 months agoread more
  • In India, most families depend on borewell or well water. Most cities like Bangalore, Mumbai, Pune, etc get well or borewell water for drinking. Borewell water is usually safe to drink but it is not 100 percent pure because of its hardness and contamination level. Your borewell water might contain b...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 1 year 6 months agoread more

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I am trying to understand if any area in Chennai gets clean metro water through out the year which end user can consume by letting it to their sump directly. Central Chennai is currently facing acute water shortage and as far as I enquired looks most of them gets intermittent supply, that too metro water often gets polluted so have to rely on lorry only.

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An RTI application reveals huge gaps in sewage treatment infrastructure in UP.

Uttar Pradesh generates second most urban sewage in India at 12 percent of the national total behind only Maharashtra at 13 percent.

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I am from central Chennai and groundwater level in our area has drastically reduced, wo have to depend on other sources (Lorry and Metro water). Metro water often gets polluted so we are looking for control valve open/close by observing the flow through hand pump before letting it to the sump. The challenge here is metro water line to the sump is some 8 feet deep and we don't have proper provision to get down. Can someone please advice if we can have some control valve above the ground level by any means ?

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Hi,

In our Apartment STP water quality gets affected regularly, when checked with AMC vendor we got to know that chemicals i.e paints, acid etc causes damage to STP. Please let me know whether really this kind of chemicals spoil the STP. If yes, please share the details of the chemicals/households chemicals.

Thanks, Saravanan Kumar K

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Faulty pipelines and lack of proper sewage treatment plants are some of the causes of increasing jaundice cases in Raipur.

The family of Somesh Manikpuri of Amasivani colony in Raipur is still in shock of his sudden demise from jaundice in May this year. Six similar deaths have been reported from Raipur since April 2018. Memsingh Chandrakar, a resident of Naharpara, another locality in Raipur, was also affected by jaundice in May. He says, “We did not have an epidemic like this in Naharpara till a decade ago. The quality of drinking water was far better then than it is now and we lived a healthy life.

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While crores of rupees have been allocated for cleaning up Ganga, the river continues to flow filthy.

As the Ganga emerges from the glaciers and glides along the foothills of the mighty Himalayas through the towns and cities with their sprawling ghats, engineered embankments, hydroelectric dams, and interrupted flows at barrages, the icy chilliness of its waters is lost. Pilgrims swarm its bank to pay obeisance to the holy river but the river continues to be treated as a dump yard for human waste, dirt and rubbish.

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Artist and environmentalist Madhavi Kolte is on a mission to save the dying Mutha in Pune through her drawings and sculptures.

River Mutha, the pride of Pune, lovingly called 'Muthai' or 'mother Mutha', is dying a slow death, thanks to the rapidly urbanising city which is depositing huge amounts of untreated sewage and dirt in its water. The pollution of the river is consistently rising. The situation is so bad that the river has been declared dead at many stretches.

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Updated Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) standard requires reporting on water impacts across the value chain.

Access to freshwater is essential for all life and is a human right recognised by the United Nations. However, millions of people around the world face water scarcity, poor water quality, and inadequate sanitation. Companies operating in areas with water stress have an urgent responsibility to track their impacts to make informed decisions that trigger meaningful action.

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Hello,

I am going to buy a water purifier, and to choose the type, I would like to know the quality of water in our area.

We are staying in Santosh our, Kolkata. Pin Code-700075

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A new device makes defluoridation simple and easy to execute in remote areas where fluorosis is found to be severe.

Estimates suggest that about 10 million Indians are affected by fluorosis, a sickness associated with the consumption of increased concentrations of fluoride, mostly through water. Bones get weakened due to excessive accumulation of fluoride in them which results in increased hip and wrist fractures. Dental enamel gets eroded. The fluoride toxicity can also affect the kidneys and suppress the functioning of the thyroid. In children, neurodevelopmental disorders are noticed.

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