Mountain Summit Kohima 2013

The Himalayan region in India covers about 5 lakh square km and consists of ten states and two districts, inhabited by approximately 64 million people as per the 2001 census.  Water resources in the region are under stress due to increasing population, erratic rainfall and winter aridity due to climate change.

The mountain states of India face common issues and challenges. Similarly, mountain peoples across the Himalayan region have realised that the solutions to meet these challenges are also similar. Implementing them will become easier if the states work together. A common front will make it easier for the Himalayan States to present their strategies for development to the Centre.

Map of the Himalayan states of India

With this end in view, the Indian Mountain Initiative (IMI) was conceived by the Central Himalayan Environment Association (CHEA) in 2010 at Nainital. It  attempts to provide a platform for sustained and effective dialogue to bring mountain concerns to the  national and global agenda. The initiative brings the eleven mountain states of the Indian Himalayan Region (IHR) including the hill districts of Assam and West Bengal onto this platform.

The 3rd Mountain Summit was  held in Kohima, Nagaland in September 2013 around the themes of forest, water, and agriculture.

Rather than invite papers from selected authors and presenters, the summit chose an approach designed to maximise participation. Contributions in a variety of forms, including papers, articles, photos and movies were invited from a wide array of people. These were collated and their points included in a synthesis paper which was circulated to all the delegates in advance of the summit. This paper then provided a base document for the deliberations during the summit. This ensured that instead of a limited number of speakers, people across the mountain states including those who could not be physically present at the summit could have their say. Each theme was managed by a group of anchors who were responsible for collating the submissions and providing direction to the discussions.

The water theme was organised around four issues :

  • Water conflicts
  • Water rights and access (including governance and gender issues)
  • Innovations and technologies for mountain water management/conservation
  • Policy gaps and opportunities in water conservation and management

Climate change is a reality in the mountains, more than in any other part of the world. It influences every aspect of life in the Himalayan region. Conflicts are exacerbated by heightened water insecurity, which also affects peoples' access to water. Technologies need to take into consideration future weather and water behaviour in a changing world and policies for water conservation also need to keep an eye on future changes. Climate change was therefore a cross-cutting issue.

India Water Portal co-hosted the Water theme. We, along with the anchors,  were responsible for inviting submissions for that theme, collating them, managing the sessions, as well as documenting the proceedings. The articles featured below present submissions received by the water theme, key presentations, interviews with some of the delegates, and videos of the summit proceedings.

Download the synthesis paper

Download the final presentations on water, forest and agriculture

 

 

  • The theme for the Conclave this year is “Water Use Efficiency: An Imperative for India” to highlight the imperative of water use efficiency in the industry, agriculture and urban contexts.  The Indian economy at present is struggling with excessive population growth and changing water reso...
    Water Awards 2016posted 1 year 7 months agoread more
  • Call for Nominations Fourth Edition of FICCI Water Awards December 14, 2016 at FICCI, Federation House, Tansen Marg, New Delhi. Introduction The FICCI Water Awards were launched under the aegis of FICCI Water Mission, to promote awareness, policy advocacy, sharing of best practices and th...
    Water Awards 2016posted 2 years 8 months agoread more
  • Arunachal Pradesh, a state rich in water resources, has a huge potential for cheap and plentiful power. Isolated and one of the least developed states in the country, today it is viewed as the ‘powerhouse’ of the country.While the Centre views this as an opportunity to bring in economic benefits...
    sabitakaushalposted 5 years 3 months agoread more
  • The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report predicts large scale changes in temperature and precipitation over the Asian land mass. In the mountains, this translates to less snow, more intense but shorter episodes of rainfall and insufficient groundwater recharge, thereby resulting i...
    sabitakaushalposted 5 years 3 months agoread more
  • The Himalayan region is facing an unprecedented onslaught of modernization. Large-scale construction, deforestation and pollution are taking a toll on it's pristine eciology. This includes the beautiful Bhimtal lake in Nainital district, Uttarakhand. A case study has been carried out to study this e...
    sabitakaushalposted 5 years 3 months agoread more
  • Water is not ‘gender-neutral’, especially in India. It is the woman of the house who walks an average of 6 km each day to collect water for household use. In the Kumaon region, a newly married bride visits the family spring to fetch water a day after the wedding, in a symbolic tradition of ...
    sabitakaushalposted 5 years 3 months agoread more
  • Northeast India has been in turmoil over the last two decades or so because of unbridled hydropower development in the region. This article is an effort to understand the extent of hydropower development in the region, the multi-faceted and multi layered conflicts unleashed by this development and a...
    chicuposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • Watershed management, which is an integrated set of soil and water conservation techniques that retain runoff and so increase water availability, can provide an environment for fisheries development for food or trade. Fish found in streams and rivers serve as a source of food in varying degrees for ...
    chicuposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • Gender influences access to water to a high degree throughout the world, a fact recognised in the Dublin Principles but how does topography influence this access? This study detailed in this post aims to find the answer to this question.The study draws upon unstructured interviews that focused ...
    chicuposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • The name Tripura originated from 'Twi' meaning water and 'Para' meaning land. The indigenous population, which is about 32%, refer to Tripura as Twipra, meaning land of water. However, the state no longer seems to be living up to its name. Its annual average per capita water availability is 35,...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • Meghalaya is rich in minerals, especially coal. This has led to rampant mining in the state. Large scale denudation of forest cover, scarcity of water, destruction of water sources, pollution of air, water and soil, and degradation of agricultural lands are some of the conspicuous environmental impl...
    chicuposted 5 years 4 months agoread more
  • Hydropower is considered as 'green' power and the Sikkim Government's policy has been to synchronize development imperatives with conscious efforts on environment sustainability. This paper presents the results of a survey carried out among communities living along a 54-km long project affected stre...
    chicuposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • Despite being endowed with adequate rainfall, most parts of the Himalayas are considered water-stressed for both agricultural and domestic purposes. This is mainly due to the seasonality of precipitation, which is concentrated to the monsoon months. It remains dry for rest of the year. The water cri...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • The term ‘water tower’ has been widely adopted to express the importance of mountains in providing freshwater to downstream areas. In fact, more than half of humanity relies on freshwater from mountain regions (UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation).  Sikkim is unique in that it is on...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • Hydropower development in Bhutan has gained considerable ground as a sector capable of contributing to the development of the country. In 2012, Bhutan earned $177 million through energy export. However, these developmental activities are also prone to natural hazards like landslides since the region...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • Nagaland depends on surface sources such as streams, rivulets, springs and ponds, which are monsoon fed for its drinking water. However, the quantity of water in these sources has depleted across the state. This could be due to deforestation, jhum cultivation and other human intervention. Destructio...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 5 months agoread more
  • On a train journey from Nagaland, a friend and I began talking on the subject of water. He said to me, "You have so much water in the Brahmaputra Valley and your lands are always flooded but we have to struggle for a drop of water in the hills". I said, "You can save us from the catastrophe of flood...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 6 months agoread more
  • Himalayan forests span a two-and-a-half thousand kilometer stretch and have a wide range of climates; they are beset by problems that need innovative solutions. Rajesh Thadani discussed these problems and possible solutions at  the Sustainable Mountain Development Summit organised in Kohima, Se...
    chicuposted 5 years 6 months agoread more
  •  Every year, we have about 76 disasters in the Himalayas, some 36,000 people are killed and over a million affected by disasters. The loss of life and damage does not need to occur. How people manage the situation can relieve the situation much better.About a third of these disasters are from f...
    chicuposted 5 years 7 months agoread more
  • Mountain farmers are facing a very volatile situation right now. Food crops are being replaced by cash crops, which return better dividends. Due to this, their overall economy has gotten much better. As a whole, more of them are migrating from rural to urban areas. Their nomadic way of life is dwind...
    Manu Moudgilposted 5 years 7 months agoread more

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The theme for the Conclave this year is “Water Use Efficiency: An Imperative for India” to highlight the imperative of water use efficiency in the industry, agriculture and urban contexts

November 28, 2017 10:00AM
November 27, 2017 12:00PM

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December 14, 2016 9:30AM

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Water conflicts in Arunachal Pradesh have left power projects and people at opposite ends of the struggle. Understanding, and not merely suppressing people, will help resolve this conflict.

Arunachal Pradesh, a state rich in water resources, has a huge potential for cheap and plentiful power. Isolated and one of the least developed states in the country, today it is viewed as the ‘powerhouse’ of the country.

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The solution to water scarcity due to the shrinking monsoon season & the resultant declining discharge of natural springs lies in storing water. For this the forestland needs to be conserved.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report predicts large scale changes in temperature and precipitation over the Asian land mass. In the mountains, this translates to less snow, more intense but shorter episodes of rainfall and insufficient groundwater recharge, thereby resulting in the drying up of water sources.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Tourism and other human interventions in the Bhimtal area in Uttarakhand has led to drastic changes that have altered the way of life and land use in the region. Can this trend be reversed?

The Himalayan region is facing an unprecedented onslaught of modernization. Large-scale construction, deforestation and pollution are taking a toll on it's pristine eciology. This includes the beautiful Bhimtal lake in Nainital district, Uttarakhand. A case study has been carried out to study this effect of human activities in the region of Bhimtal and 11 satellite villages, in an area of 21.57 sq km. The main water source for the study region is Bhimtal lake, which not only forms the major drainage reservoir, but is also the source of water for domestic and irrigation purposes.

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Generalization and mere quotas for women will not solve this gender bias. Involvement and empowerment of women are necessary for initiatives to succeed in the water sector.

Water is not ‘gender-neutral’, especially in India. It is the woman of the house who walks an average of 6 km each day to collect water for household use. In the Kumaon region, a newly married bride visits the family spring to fetch water a day after the wedding, in a symbolic tradition of water responsibility. Gender still matters in issues concerned with water, and a review of the current status of women and water projects highlights the following points.

The link between women and water governance

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Hydropower development is creating various types of conflict in Northeast India. How can we contain the unrest due to this spate of dam construction?

Northeast India has been in turmoil over the last two decades or so because of unbridled hydropower development in the region. This article is an effort to understand the extent of hydropower development in the region, the multi-faceted and multi layered conflicts unleashed by this development and also explore ways of engaging with them. It is organised around three broad sections:

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Topics

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Regions

Fish found in streams and rivers are a source of food to about 40% of the households in parts of the Himalayas. Including fisheries in local watershed management is crucial.

Watershed management, which is an integrated set of soil and water conservation techniques that retain runoff and so increase water availability, can provide an environment for fisheries development for food or trade. Fish found in streams and rivers serve as a source of food in varying degrees for about 40% of the households in the mid-Himalayas, which lie between the Siwaliks and the Great Himalayas at an altitude of 3,700 to 4,500 metres. However declining flows in streams and rivers, combined with unsustainable fishing practices, have led to a decline in fish availability.

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Women have always had an important role in water management. A study in South Sikkim aims to find out if topography, in addition to gender, influences access to water.

Gender influences access to water to a high degree throughout the world, a fact recognised in the Dublin Principles but how does topography influence this access? This study detailed in this post aims to find the answer to this question.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Tripura has 35,000 litres of water annually per capita. That is double that of the national average. So why are its people still facing water shortage?

The name Tripura originated from 'Twi' meaning water and 'Para' meaning land. The indigenous population, which is about 32%, refer to Tripura as Twipra, meaning land of water. However, the state no longer seems to be living up to its name. Its annual average per capita water availability is 35,000 liters, which is almost double that of the national average of 18,000 liters but people are still facing a two-pronged problem - water shortage as well as water-borne diseases. 

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