Informal Sector

  • The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared coronavirus disease a pandemic. Originating from Wuhan in China, it has traversed almost the entire globe, and claimed more than 41,000 lives, while over 8 lakh people are infected already. That’s largely the urban population. In India, despite all...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 days 21 hours agoread more
  • Millions of Indian women can take up to six trips a day to gather and transport water, which takes up a major part of their day. During scorching summers when many sources dry up, their drudgery gets even worse. Stories of girls dropping out of school to share the burden of carrying water are also n...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 weeks 1 day agoread more
  • Historically, water is a gendered burden, with women being the primary caregivers responsible for cooking, washing and cleaning chores in the house and in modern times in institutions (teachers, anganwadi and healthcare workers). Women have traditionally been associated with various w...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 month 18 hours agoread more
  • Many of the challenges sanitation workers face, stem from their lack of visibility in society, says a report ‘Health, Safety and Dignity of Sanitation Workers’ produced jointly by The World Bank, International Labour Organization (ILO), WaterAid and the World Health Organization (WHO)....
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 month 6 days agoread more
  • Maharashtra is the second largest sugar producing state in India, after Uttar Pradesh where as high as 1.6 million farmers cultivate sugarcane on 0.7 million hectares of land. The sugarcane industry provides direct employment to about 0.16 million workers while 1.5 million workers engage in sugarcan...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 1 month 1 week agoread more
  • It’s a dull reality that the state of water in the urban slum of Lalbagh near Azadpur in north Delhi was awful till a few years back. Hoards of people would queue up to get water from the public taps or the tankers along the road. Life was tough here and people got access to piped water supply onl...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 month 1 week agoread more
  • “Every single number in the budget, be it receipts or expenditure is a lie. The budget numbers can no longer be trusted, as the difference between actual expenditure and budget estimates are off by around 25 percent. The year ends at the end of March, and the estimates are based on data only till ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 month 3 weeks agoread more
  • Locally called Neeru, water of the Nilgiris in its springs and wetlands has been the fountainhead for two main rivers systems of South India. Today, with growing anthropogenic influences, there is a water crisis in the hills that needs our attention more than ever before. Once in twelve years, the ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 months 1 week agoread more
  • Environment Ministry notifies new wetland conservation rules The Environment Ministry has notified new conservation rules that prohibit setting up or expansion of industries, and disposal of construction and demolition waste within the wetlands. The ministry has also ordered all the state and union...
    swatiposted 2 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Delhi CM announces free sewage cleaning schemes for unauthorised colonies In an effort to end sewer deaths, Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal has announced a scheme for free cleaning of the septic tanks in unauthorised colonies in the capital. Under the new scheme, any person can make ...
    swatiposted 4 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • To many in the water sector, K. J. Joy needs no introduction. An activist at heart, Joy is known for his untiring rights based work in mobilising communities in rural Maharashtra, and for his research work on water and water related conflicts including inter-state riparian water conflicts. In a con...
    priyadposted 5 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • Supreme Court question authorities on why manual scavenging still prevails Taking note of four to five deaths every month due to manual scavenging, the Supreme Court came down heavily on the government for failing to provide protective gear to people engaged in manual scavenging and cleaning of sew...
    swatiposted 6 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • Arecanut is generally grown in the Malnad area of Karnataka, which receives high rainfall. However, it is also grown in dry land areas of Tumkur district, also in Karnataka, using groundwater. Arecanut cultivation area doubled from 5851 hectares in 1990-91 (Kumar 2003) to 12,628 hectares in 2001-02 ...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 6 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Floods are an annual phenomenon in Assam. They are as integral to the state as the Brahmaputra River is, and each monsoon, we are reminded that Assam exists (or is drowning). As I write this piece, Assam is slowly recovering from the first wave of flood this monsoon. For several weeks, the entire st...
    priyadposted 7 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • P Sainath has been documenting stories from rural India for over three decades now. He is the founder-editor of People's Archive of Rural India (PARI), a digital archive dedicated to people whose voices and stories don't always find space in mainstream media. Sainath previously covered the rural bea...
    priyadposted 7 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Bihar and northeast India reel under floods As the water level of the Brahmaputra River rose above the danger level across Assam, 30 of the 33 districts in the state were deluged by floods, affecting nearly 43 lakh people and claiming 15 lives. In Bihar, incessant rains in neighbouring Nepal ca...
    swatiposted 8 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Nirmala Sitharaman, Finance Minister alluded to gaon, garib and kisan as the centre of all policies of this government, while announcing a clutch of schemes aimed at the rural and urban poor. Her budget speech last week reiterated the government's commitment to ensuring piped water supply to al...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 9 months 18 hours agoread more
  • Nearly 790,000 anti-drought works under MGNREGA incomplete or abandoned According to the data collated by the Ministry of Rural Development, a total of 790,000 anti-drought works, worth Rs 417 crore, under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGA) are either incomplete...
    swatiposted 10 months 1 week agoread more
  • India has, over the last 50 years, spent approximately $50 billion on developing water resources and another estimated $7.5 billion on drinking water, with little to show for the money (Devraj 2002). Apart from big dams and irrigation systems, the government has encouraged the digging of millions of...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 11 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Hundreds gathered to release the Safai Karmachari Manifesto ahead of Lok Sabha elections 2019 at the Indian Social Institute, Delhi on April 4, 2019. The manifesto was released by the Safai Karmachari Andolan (SKA), a movement for the elimination of manual scavenging and restoring the rights of the ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 12 months 3 days agoread more

Pages

As corona virus 'travels' to rural areas, PRADAN ramps up its response by training tribals and marginalised women.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared coronavirus disease a pandemic. Originating from Wuhan in China, it has traversed almost the entire globe, and claimed more than 41,000 lives, while over 8 lakh people are infected already. That’s largely the urban population.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

There is a need to focus on the “first mile” i.e. communities across rural India to be able to ensure sustainability and scalability for piped water supply.

Millions of Indian women can take up to six trips a day to gather and transport water, which takes up a major part of their day. During scorching summers when many sources dry up, their drudgery gets even worse. Stories of girls dropping out of school to share the burden of carrying water are also not unheard of.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Why women need to be trained and engaged in monitoring and surveillance of water quality at the community level in rural India?

Historically, water is a gendered burden, with women being the primary caregivers responsible for cooking, washing and cleaning chores in the house and in modern times in institutions (teachers, anganwadi and healthcare workers). Women have traditionally been associated with various water related tasks - be it collecting, fetching, or purifying water.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

A report highlights the dangers for the millions of people who clean toilets, sewers and septic tanks the world over and calls for urgent action.

Many of the challenges sanitation workers face, stem from their lack of visibility in society, says a report ‘Health, Safety and Dignity of Sanitation Workers’ produced jointly by The World Bank, International Labour Organization (ILO), Wa

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Overworked, poorly paid and deprived of any rights, migrant cane cutters, especially women are most vulnerable and continue to suffer from a number of health and security risks.

Maharashtra is the second largest sugar producing state in India, after Uttar Pradesh where as high as 1.6 million farmers cultivate sugarcane on 0.7 million hectares of land. The sugarcane industry provides direct employment to about 0.16 million workers while 1.5 million workers engage in sugarcane harvesting and transport operations every year.

While Maharashtra boasts of having the largest cooperative sugar mills in India, private sugar mills are gaining prominence over cooperative mills over the last few years.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Women swipe clean drinking water through an automated dispensing unit at the Lalbagh slum.

It’s a dull reality that the state of water in the urban slum of Lalbagh near Azadpur in north Delhi was awful till a few years back. Hoards of people would queue up to get water from the public taps or the tankers along the road. Life was tough here and people got access to piped water supply only recently. Paying for clean water from private companies was unaffordable and people often depended on sources that were polluted and unsafe to drink. Women and children had to bear the burden of water collection and this cost them a lot in terms of time and energy.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Is the budget a bummer? Experts speak at a panel discussion organised by CBGA.

“Every single number in the budget, be it receipts or expenditure is a lie. The budget numbers can no longer be trusted, as the difference between actual expenditure and budget estimates are off by around 25 percent. The year ends at the end of March, and the estimates are based on data only till the end of December, so the estimate of receipts and expenditure in the next three months is a lie,” says Jayati Ghosh, Professor of Economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University at a panel discussion organised by the Centre for Budget and Governance Accountability (CBGA) in New Delhi recently.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Conserving springs, small hill wetlands and their catchment in the Nilgiris.

Locally called Neeru, water of the Nilgiris in its springs and wetlands has been the fountainhead for two main rivers systems of South India. Today, with growing anthropogenic influences, there is a water crisis in the hills that needs our attention more than ever before.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Policy matters this week

Environment Ministry notifies new wetland conservation rules

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Policy matters this week

Delhi CM announces free sewage cleaning schemes for unauthorised colonies

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Informal Sector