Hydropower

  • The Kerala flood of 2018 was 30 percent less intense than that of 1924 deluge, the biggest in Kerala’s history. Yet it caused a huge loss of lives, property and infrastructure. Swollen rivers ruptured their banks and floodwaters gushed through houses built on the floodplains. One reason for the un...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • India gets its first soil moisture map developed using hydrological model In a joint exercise by IIT Gandhinagar and the India Meteorological Department (IMD), a country-wide soil moisture forecast has been developed at seven and 30-day lead times. The product, termed as ‘Experimental Forecasts L...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • Wildlife Board clears Lower Demwe hydel project despite flaws in report Despite non-completion of the rapid impact assessment of wildlife, the National Board for Wildlife (NBWL) has cleared the 1,750 MW Lower Demwe hydel project on the Lohit River, Arunachal Pradesh. The two-year wildlife impact st...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • World is losing the wetlands at a rate of 0.78 percent a year: Ramsar Convention The Global Wetland Outlook, presented by Ramsar Convention, has reported that wetlands are disappearing three times faster than forests with 35 percent of world's wetland lost between 1970-2015. As per the report, the ...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • Every time there is a huge flood in India with massive loss of lives and extensive physical damage, there is a hue and cry. Especially, if this takes place in an area not normally prone to such floods. Assam and Bihar, for instance, are regularly laid waste by floods and so, there is not much agitat...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • Cyclone causes rain in 18 states; floods, landslides reported in North India A cyclonic storm Daye made its landfall in Odisha on September 21. Although the tropical storm had weakened into a deep depression soon after making landfall, the wind pattern has changed triggering rainfall in Punjab, Har...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • Additional funds of over Rs 1,300 crore allocated to dam safety project The Centre has approved the revision of the cost estimate for the ongoing Dam Rehabilitation and Improvement Project (DRIP) from Rs 2,100 crore to Rs 3,466 crore. The project has also got a two-year extension and now it is sche...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • The family of Somesh Manikpuri of Amasivani colony in Raipur is still in shock of his sudden demise from jaundice in May this year. Six similar deaths have been reported from Raipur since April 2018. Memsingh Chandrakar, a resident of Naharpara, another locality in Raipur, was also affected by jaund...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • Polluted river stretches increases to 351, as against 302 in 2015 According to a recent assessment by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), there are 351 polluted river stretches in the country  with 45 of them being critically polluted. Although a greater focus is given to the Ganga riv...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • As the Ganga emerges from the glaciers and glides along the foothills of the mighty Himalayas through the towns and cities with their sprawling ghats, engineered embankments, hydroelectric dams, and interrupted flows at barrages, the icy chilliness of its waters is lost. Pilgrims swarm its bank to p...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 year 11 months agoread more
  • No more clearance to activities affecting eco zones in the Western Ghats: NGT Taking note of the recent floods in Kerala, the National Green Tribunal has restrained the six states falling in the Western Ghats region from giving environmental clearance to activities which may adversely affect the ec...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 year 12 months agoread more
  • When the five overflow gates of the Cheruthoni dam, a part of the Idukki reservoir comprising Cheruthoni, Kulamavu and Idukki arch dam were opened one by one on August 9, 2018, a torrent of water and mud gushed out. Heavy, unceasing rains had led to the dam reaching close to its maximum capacity, fo...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 years 2 weeks agoread more
  • Kerala floods: Death toll rises to 373 The floods in Kerala have taken away nearly 400 lives and have displaced around 1.2 million people. The Centre has classified the flood fury as a calamity of severe nature even though the state had pitched it as a national disaster. Reviewing the flo...
    Swati Bansalposted 2 years 2 weeks agoread more
  • A new study has suggested that the government must consider changes occurring due to climate change while planning new hydropower projects. The generation of hydropower from top seven hydropower projects in India has suffered due to climate variability in the past six decades. Future projected clim...
    arathiposted 2 years 2 weeks agoread more
  • Recently, Delhi saw an urban Chipko movement of sorts with the people coming out in large numbers with a single agenda—save the last of the trees left in the city. In the famous Chipko movement of 1973, local communities in Tehri Garhwal, Uttarakhand emblematically embraced trees to demand an end ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 years 3 weeks agoread more
  • The interstate dispute between Odisha and Chhattisgarh over the Mahanadi's water is an ongoing one and it looks like both the state governments have no interest in finding a long-term solution. It all started with the Chhattisgarh government constructing six barrages on the upstream of the Mahanadi...
    makarandpurohitposted 2 years 1 month agoread more
  • In India, although we have approximately four months of monsoon (which is basically 45 days of effective rainfall), in drought prone areas, there are only 10-15 days of harvestable rain in the entire season. If you don't get enough rain during those days, it's a cause for worry. Given that evaporat...
    priyadposted 2 years 2 months agoread more
  • A growing demand for water implies the need for an improved understanding of our resources, and the ability to manage that demand in an equitable and sustainable way. Wells, not dams, have been the temples of modern India India is a groundwater economy. At 260 cubic km per year, our country is the...
    priyadposted 2 years 2 months agoread more
  • Maharashtra mulls exemption on 'certain' plastic items following crackdown on plastic After the fifth day of a strict crackdown on plastic, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) has decided to not levy fines on certain banned plastic items as they are under consideration for exemption b...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 2 years 2 months agoread more
  • Tired from the Baidyanath dhamyatra (pilgrimage) in the nearby town of Deoghar, Nunlal Kamath is stealing a quick nap on a charpoy outside his house. His house is right on the western bank of Kosi, north Bihar’s river of sorrow, in a particularly flood-prone area where there are no high grounds or...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 years 2 months agoread more

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A study finds that hydropower organisations in India continue to maintain a culture of hierarchy, follow masculine norms and are insensitive to the needs of women and the marginalised.

Large dams, back in the game?

Recent years are seeing the re-emergence of large dams as sources of hydropower generation in global development policy. Large dams are being propagated as clean, green, climate-mitigating and a major source of renewable energy in emerging markets in the Global South.

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A Future Earth Conference

Opening new frontiers in water system diagnostics and innovative solutions to mitigate the 21st-century global water crisis

September 24, 2019 9:00AM - September 27, 2019 6:00PM
August 31, 2019 12:00PM

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Policy matters this week

Government cuts budget for Jal Shakti Ministry by 9.4 percent; increases funds for rural drinking water mission 

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News this week

India not a water defict country. Neglect and lack of monitoring behind country's water scarcity: CWC

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A new study finds that 55% of the glaciers in the Satluj basin could disappear by 2050 and 97% by 2090 due to climate change.

River Satluj, the powerhouse of the Himalayas

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Policy matters this week

Centre launches Jal Shakti Abhiyan

To tackle the water crisis looming the country, the Centre launched the Jal Shakti Abhiyan, a water conservation campaign focussing on 1,592 stressed blocks in 256 districts across the country.

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An analysis of the new Nal se Jal scheme, promising drinking water to every household in India by 2024.

Water scarcity has a history … and that history is nothing less than the history of government. – Alatout, 2008.

Attempts to privatize water may have increased globally in the recent past, but in more general terms, governments largely control water as in India, where water is a state subject. After all, water is the only life-giving non-substitutable good; hence, controlling water means controlling life, and controlling society at large.

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What are India's plans for managing its natural resources, undertaking sustainable land management and combating droughts?

Managing natural resources, the sustainable way

On the occasion of World Day to Combat Desertification (WDCD 2019), India elaborated on its plans for managing its natural resources, undertaking sustainable land management and combatting droughts.  The highlighted actions are expected to help India meets its overall target of achieving Land Degradation Neutrality by 2030. The highlighted actions are expected to help India meets its overall target of achieving Land Degradation Neutrality by 2030.

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Policy matters this week

Government to launch rural piped water scheme

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The film Surya Ganga makes a case for a shift in India’s energy policy towards renewable sources.

Surya Ganga, a film directed by Valli Bindana takes an all embracing view of the energy sector, especially the social and environmental consequences of big energy projects in India. The film was released in India recently. The story begins with an inquisitive six-year-old girl along with her mother and uncle setting out on a journey across the length and breadth of India to seek answers to the adverse impacts of dams on the river Ganga.

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