Governance

  • Since last week, people of Birjain village have been protesting against erosion by the river bank. They are demanding that the government should put in efforts to prevent river erosion and save their houses, otherwise they will continue with their Satyagrah and perform Jal Samadhi (suicide by drowni...
    Swati Bansalposted 2 days 5 hours agoread more
  • People in remote hamlets left out by previous schemes like Swajal and Sector Wide Approach Program of the Uttarakhand Jal Nigam and Uttarakhand Jal Sansthan longed for household-level piped water supply for drinking and domestic purposes. People’s Science Institute (PSI), a not for profit organisa...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 days 18 hours agoread more
  • Many organizations, individuals already working in the field of water have shown genuine interests to be partner in this pan-India programme, Jal Jeevan Mission. Thus, JJM aims to harness the huge potential of the local community through Voluntary Organizations (VOs), Non-Governmental...
    Swati Bansalposted 3 days 56 min agoread more
  • “We went through a lot of trouble over the month. By God’s grace, we are still surviving." While describing his plight, the pain in the 43-year-old Prakash Mukhiya's voice is palpable. He was trapped in his thatched hut for more than a month in floods. Now that the water has receded, he is able...
    Swati Bansalposted 3 days 6 hours agoread more
  • India has seen large scale rural-urban migration of people trying to escape rural distress in the last few decades. “The urban areas are looked at as the centre of India's development trajectory and urbanism has become synonymous with development, as rural masses drift int...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 days 22 hours agoread more
  • A civic body frees a river instead of concretising it, for the first time Under the Centre’s ‘Smart Cities’ mission, funds were allocated to the Nashik Municipal Corporation for Godavari riverfront development. However, the funds are instead being used for decommissioning the riverfont projec...
    Swati Bansalposted 5 days 22 hours agoread more
  • There aren’t many studies on understanding the socio-economic impact of river pollution, and the handful of those available miss out on capturing the voices of the local communities who are most affected by river pollution. Keeping this in mind, the Tata Centre for Development (TCD) at UChicago un...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 week 1 hour agoread more
  • IUKWC has put together a set of interviews with researchers from six Indo-UK projects that provide an overview of their research outputs and how these can support water operations, management and/or decision making. Fully interactive - interviewees will be available to answer your questio...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 week 3 days agoread more
  • About the webinar: In the eastern, north-eastern and northern parts of the country, the monsoon period is largely referred to as the flood season. However, since past few years, both the urban and rural spaces in western and southern India also have started experiencing floods on a regular basis,...
    Swati Bansalposted 1 week 3 days agoread more
  • A large section of the population living in the Ganga river basin still depends on the river for daily use activities and livelihood. Hence, the cleaning of the Ganga river’s water and making it safe for use remains a major goal for policymakers. Towards this end, the Namami Gange Clean-up program...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 week 5 days agoread more
  • Economic development and creation of jobs have been India’s most critical challenges, and continue to be an overriding priority for the government. India’s rise in the World Bank’s global ranking on the ease of doing business is complemented with a successive downturn in its position on t...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 weeks 21 hours agoread more
  • India’s Himalayan rivers have been a cradle of civilisational development and a centre for faith and culture for ages. Ganga being a fertile basin has been a significant contributor to our agricultural economy as well as our river-based agrarian development. It cannot be visualised simply as a sin...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 weeks 3 days agoread more
  • Indore once again tops the Swachh Survekshan 2020 in the cleanest city category Fourth time in a row, Indore has once again won accolades for being the cleanest city in the country in Swachh Survekshan 2020, followed by Surat and Navi Mumbai. Commissioned by the Ministry of Urban Development, Swach...
    Swati Bansalposted 2 weeks 5 days agoread more
  • Swachh Bharat Mission-Urban: Next phase to focus on water treatment and toilet waste disposal According to the Ministry of Housing & Urban Affairs, the Swachh Bharat Mission-Urban (SBM-U) has made significant progress in both sanitation and solid waste management. Since its launch in 2014, 4324...
    Swati Bansalposted 2 weeks 5 days agoread more
  • Eric Holthaus’s ‘Future Earth: A Radical Vision For What’s Possible in the Age of Warming’ is unique in its scope, conceptually speculative and realistic. It is grounded by an eclectic mix of evidence of global warming and narratives of social movements led and championed by activist...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 weeks 18 hours agoread more
  • Panchayats have been the core of India's rural governance even before they received the constitutional mandate through the 73rd constitutional amendment in 1992, forming the basis of decentralization in the country. There are 2.5 lakh gram panchayats; over 6 lakhs villages; around 4500 urban local b...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 weeks 1 day agoread more
  • About Arghyam Arghyam is a registered public charitable foundation that has been working on safe and sustainable water for the last 15 years. It has 3 focus areas of intervention in water – groundwater, springs and water quality. All the 3 areas have built up momentum and created signif...
    Swati Bansalposted 3 weeks 3 days agoread more
  • India is the second largest tea producer in the world, with production at 1.2 million metric tons in 2014. There are 563.98 thousand hectares of tea plantations in India and the states of Assam (304.40 thousand hectares), followed by West Bengal (140.44 thousand hectares), Tamil Nadu (69.62 thousand...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 3 weeks 4 days agoread more
  • Lockdown in April to May 2020 due to COVID-19 led to the mass migration of workers from the cities to villages. Despite strict measures by the government to stop any movement, people facing lost jobs and high cost of living in the cities began to walk back or use whatever transportation was availabl...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 weeks 6 days agoread more
  • The Amphan cyclone that struck the Sundarbans in the month of May this year has wreaked havoc in the area destroying lives and livelihood. A lot of the locals living in the Sundarbans depend on animal husbandry and fishing to earn a living. The cyclone destroyed animal rearing shelters and swept awa...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 weeks 6 days agoread more

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River erosion, so intense, that the whole village is in danger. As the government’s help seems a distant dream, locals carry out Satyagrah to expose their plight to the authorities.

Since last week, people of Birjain village have been protesting against erosion by the river bank. They are demanding that the government should put in efforts to prevent river erosion and save their houses, otherwise they will continue with their Satyagrah and perform Jal Samadhi (suicide by drowning). Sattore, a flood-prone Panchayat has about 3000 houses. According to the locals, erosion was not present in the panchayat till 2019, when it was first reported. The problem intensified this year.

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PSI addresses the shortage of safe drinking water in remote Uttarakhand villages through a participatory community-based approach to springshed management.

People in remote hamlets left out by previous schemes like Swajal and Sector Wide Approach Program of the Uttarakhand Jal Nigam and Uttarakhand Jal Sansthan longed for household-level piped water supply for drinking and domestic purposes. People’s Science Institute (PSI), a not for profit organisation based in Dehradun took up a drinking water and sanitation program with the active participation of local User Water and Sanitation Sub Committees (UWSSCs) through the support of The Hans Foundation in 2016.

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Many organizations, individuals already working in the field of water have shown genuine interests to be partner in this pan-India programme, Jal Jeevan Mission. Thus, JJM aims to harness the huge potential of the local community through Voluntary Organizations (VOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), social service & charity organizations, and professionals working in drinking water sector, who are willing to work towards mobilizing and enhancing the capacities of the communities to achieve the goal of the mission.

September 16, 2020 12:00AM

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People in Bihar are struggling with the floods for a month now, while the government has turned a blind eye to their plight.

“We went through a lot of trouble over the month. By God’s grace, we are still surviving."

While describing his plight, the pain in the 43-year-old Prakash Mukhiya's voice is palpable. He was trapped in his thatched hut for more than a month in floods. Now that the water has receded, he is able to cook food in his house.

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The pandemic has bared our vulnerabilities and shaken our collective consciousness to focus on agriculture and rural economy.

India has seen large scale rural-urban migration of people trying to escape rural distress in the last few decades. “The urban areas are looked at as the centre of India's development trajectory and urbanism has become synonymous with development, as rural masses drift into the glitter and grind of the urban life,” said Prof RS Deshpande, an honorary visiting professor at the Institute for Social and Economic Change (ISEC), Bangalore.

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News this week

A civic body frees a river instead of concretising it, for the first time

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A user-friendly water quality index could be created to help riverine communities take informed decisions.

There aren’t many studies on understanding the socio-economic impact of river pollution, and the handful of those available miss out on capturing the voices of the local communities who are most affected by river pollution. Keeping this in mind, the Tata Centre for Development (TCD) at UChicago undertook a focused social study with the riverine communities of the Yamuna in Delhi, which contributes to nearly 76 per cent of the pollution load in the river.

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IUKWC has put together a set of interviews with researchers from six Indo-UK projects that provide an overview of their research outputs and how these can support water operations, management and/or decision making.

Fully interactive - interviewees will be available to answer your questions during two hour windows

Bilingual - a transcript in Hindi, will be made available for each video

September 9, 2020 11:30AM - September 9, 2020 1:30PM

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About the webinar:

September 10, 2020 4:00PM - October 8, 2020 5:30PM

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The fishing community is the most vulnerable as its members come into direct contact with the river water and thus, suffer the maximum impact of pollution.

A large section of the population living in the Ganga river basin still depends on the river for daily use activities and livelihood. Hence, the cleaning of the Ganga river’s water and making it safe for use remains a major goal for policymakers. Towards this end, the Namami Gange Clean-up programme was launched with a budget of Rs 20,000 crore during the period 2015–2020. However, the National Green Tribunal stated in 2017 that “not a single drop of river Ganga has been cleaned so far.”

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