Fisheries

Featured Articles
August 21, 2022 Floods are not feared, but rather welcomed by the Mishing communities from Majuli island in Assam as they bring bountiful fish- a rich source of food, nutrition and livelihood for the community.
The Majuli island, a haven for fish (Image Source: Usha Dewani, India Water Portal)
May 8, 2022 The mighty Ganga is gradually becoming a death trap, not only for people, but also for the wonderous animals that live in its waters and depend on her for their survival. How has this happened?
The poisoned Ganges (Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)
September 1, 2021 The experience of the Foundation for Ecological Security in tribal Mandla, Madhya Pradesh
Fish harvesting by Changariya fishing cooperative, Mandla, Madhya Pradesh (Image: Foundation for Ecological Security)
April 8, 2021 The village institution collectively framed rules for the governance and management of these water commons
The efforts have resulted in the revival of the ponds. (Image: FES)
November 21, 2019 Excessive and unregulated pesticide use has not only poisoned the soil, water and environment in villages in Punjab’s Malwa region – it has also increased health risks for the people.
Farmer spraying pesticide (Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Fishing turns fishy as climate change plays truant
Climate change is here to stay. How will it affect freshwater resources and inland fisheries in India? A study explains. Posted on 28 Aug, 2022 11:32 PM

Inland aquatic fisheries form an important source of livelihood for a significant proportion of population in India. Climate change is projected to have a huge impact on inland aquatic ecosystems and the fisheries sector in India. While there are a number of studies on the impacts of climate change on freshwater ecosystems and fish, most of these are from the temperate countries.

Fish in the Tunga river at Sringeri (Image Source: Dineshkannambadi via Wikimedia Commons) Li
Floods – a boon than a bane!
Floods are not feared, but rather welcomed by the Mishing communities from Majuli island in Assam as they bring bountiful fish- a rich source of food, nutrition and livelihood for the community. Posted on 21 Aug, 2022 11:15 PM

Floods are often perceived as a destructive force in Assam and other parts of India.

The Majuli island, a haven for fish (Image Source: Usha Dewani, India Water Portal)
Toxic waters, struggling fish
The mighty Ganga is gradually becoming a death trap, not only for people, but also for the wonderous animals that live in its waters and depend on her for their survival. How has this happened? Posted on 08 May, 2022 09:04 PM

The Ganga, India's poisoned lifeline

The poisoned Ganges (Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)
Global warming can spell doom for India's freshwater fish!
Climate change is warming river waters and changing their flows. These changes can spell doom for fish that live in these waters. Posted on 24 Sep, 2021 11:12 PM

Freshwater ecosystems such as rivers, lakes, ponds cover only 0.8 percent of the Earth’s surface, but are incredibly biodiverse. They harbour around ~15,000 fish species, corresponding to approximately half of the global known fish.

Human activities such as water abstraction, diversion, damming, and pollution are posing a threat to the survival of fish.

Fish in the Tunga river at Sringeri (Image Source: Dineshkannambadi via Wikimedia Commons)
Managing water commons through fishing cooperatives
The experience of the Foundation for Ecological Security in tribal Mandla, Madhya Pradesh Posted on 01 Sep, 2021 09:36 AM

The total area under tanks and ponds in India is over 2.9 million hectares (Ministry of Jal Shakti, 2017).

Fish harvesting by Changariya fishing cooperative, Mandla, Madhya Pradesh (Image: Foundation for Ecological Security)
When the Ganges spews plastic!
Abandoned, lost or discarded fishing gear not only forms a large portion of plastic waste that the Ganges pours into the sea, it also poses a major threat to the environment and biodiversity! Posted on 04 Jun, 2021 07:59 PM

Rivers, carriers of plastic

Ganga river at Gadmukteshwar (Source: IWP Flickr photos)
Conservation of water commons through community fishery
The village institution collectively framed rules for the governance and management of these water commons Posted on 08 Apr, 2021 02:00 PM

Located in the Bichhiya block of Mandla district, Madhya Pradesh, Changariya is a small village comprising 265 households.

The efforts have resulted in the revival of the ponds. (Image: FES)
The unsung women fishers of Wular lake
Fisherwomen’s experiences and perspectives about their livelihoods based on the Wular lake. Posted on 02 Jan, 2021 08:20 PM

Nestled in the north Kashmir region is Wular lake, India’s largest freshwater lake or wetland.

The survival of many fisher households living nearby is entirely dependent on Wular lake. (Image: Manju Rawat)
Ganga's riverine communities in troubled waters
The fishing community is the most vulnerable as its members come into direct contact with the river water and thus, suffer the maximum impact of pollution. Posted on 01 Sep, 2020 03:04 PM

A large section of the population living in the Ganga river basin still depends on the river for daily use activities and livelihood. Hence, the cleaning of the Ganga river’s water and making it safe for use remains a major goal for policymakers.

There is a need to formalise the traditional occupation of riverine fishing by providing proper licensing facilities to allow for targeted policies for the community in order to mitigate the livelihood challenges being faced by it. (Image: Pikrepo)
Livestock rearers and fishers bear the brunt of cyclone Amphan
Ravaged by the severe tropical cyclone that struck the region this summer, the livestock and fishes have taken a hit, impacting people's livelihoods. Posted on 18 Aug, 2020 10:14 AM

The Amphan cyclone that struck the Sundarbans in the month of May this year has wreaked havoc in the area destroying lives and livelihood. A lot of the locals living in the Sundarbans depend on animal husbandry and fishing to earn a living. The cyclone destroyed animal rearing shelters and swept away most of the cattle and domestic animals.

The Amphan swept away the chicken coops and other domestic animals. This is Anup Bhakta standing with one of the few goats left after the storm. (Image: WaterAid, Subhrajit Sen)
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