Coronavirus

A content bank on coronavirus

 

The COVID-19 pandemic is seeing overwhelming response from grassroots organisations, donors, multilateral agencies. As a part of its humanitarian response, Arghyam reached out to several organisations working on the ground to understand their most urgent needs and we realised that along with relief material the one thing that was glaringly absent was the right information to disseminate in appropriate regional languages/ dialects. 

 

A rapid assessment and conversations with other organisations led us to a rich set of material already created by other organisations.  The Content Bank is a collation of context-relevant COVID-19 resources produced by several organizations in more than 20 Indian languages. Scroll down below the table for help on how to use it.

 

 

This content bank is also available in Hindi

 

 

Using this table:

  1.  Select a preferred language by clicking on filter, “Add Filter”
  2. Pick “Language” and pick a language for the available list
  3. (Click on filter button for the pop up box to disappear)
  4. You can add another filter along with it or replace the existing filter
  5. You can also use group by and sort similarly 

 

We sincerely thank all the organizations that have contributed content to the Content Bank. The source for each content has been provided - please ensure that they get credit when using the content. As indicated earlier, we are merely collating the content. If you have any feedback or comments on the content please write to us at contact@indiawaterportal.org and we will try and ensure these are shared with the content creators as well. 

While we have tried to take adequate care to collate the content, we do not vouch for the content and the responsibility and ownership of the content lies with the Organisation which created it. So please ensure providing credit to the Organisation when using the content. If you think that the content has been added by mistake or that any content piece is outdated, factually incorrect or if you have any other concerns, please do reach out to us at contact@indiawaterportal.org and we shall do the needful.

Did you use the content bank? Loved it? Or confused? Tell us. We would love to hear from you!

 

Featured Articles
December 29, 2020 Water resources in most Indian cities are overworked and overused, and not adequately replenished.
Cities in India are marked by unequal distribution of water, lack of access, outdated infrastructure and minimal enforcement of rainwater harvesting and other means of supply. (Image: Anish Roy, Pixabay)
December 28, 2020 The pandemic has exacerbated the issues of exclusion and vulnerability of sanitation workers.
Despite the risks and the dire conditions of their work, sanitation workers continued to do their job (Image: C S Sharada Prasad, India Water Portal)
December 26, 2020 What are the lessons learnt from COVID-19 pandemic on effective waste and resource management?
The management of waste is vital to minimize long-term risks to human and environmental health. (Image: Pasi Mäenpää, Pixabay)
May 18, 2020 More than fifty organisations in Maharashtra have come together to tackle the coronavirus pandemic with a special focus on WASH, shelter, migration and social sector recovery
PC: The Jeevan Rath Collaborative
Agriculture and food security challenges amid Covid-19
The pandemic has bared our vulnerabilities and shaken our collective consciousness to focus on agriculture and rural economy. Amita Bhaduri posted 4 months ago

India has seen large scale rural-urban migration of people trying to escape rural distress in the last few decades.

Women farmers produce vegetables through innovative farming practices in Banka, Bihar. They can sell their produce at regional markets, and earn a better income for their families. (Image: USAID, Flickr Commons, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
Decentralised governance key to handling Covid-19
There is a positive correlation between the panchayat raj system and effective handling of Covid-19, says Mani Shankar Aiyar. Amita Bhaduri posted 4 months 3 weeks ago

Panchayats have been the core of India's rural governance even before they received the constitutional mandate through the 73rd constitutional amendment in 1992, forming the basis of decentralization in the country. There are 2.5 lakh gram panchayats; over 6 lakhs villages; around 4500 urban local bodies and 4000 census towns in the country.

A first time Sarpanch of Lahora Gram Panchayat in Rajasthan’s Tonk District, stands committed, guiding the community with her political acumen. (Image: UN Women;CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
Water projects get priority in MGNREGA amidst COVID-19
Efforts needed to better utilise MGNREGA funds to deter vested interests from misappropriating. Amita Bhaduri posted 4 months 4 weeks ago

Lockdown in April to May 2020 due to COVID-19 led to the mass migration of workers from the cities to villages. Despite strict measures by the government to stop any movement, people facing lost jobs and high cost of living in the cities began to walk back or use whatever transportation was available to travel to their home villages.

Work in progress at an MGNREGA site (Image: UN Women/Gaganjit Singh)
Livestock rearers and fishers bear the brunt of cyclone Amphan
Ravaged by the severe tropical cyclone that struck the region this summer, the livestock and fishes have taken a hit, impacting people's livelihoods. Amita Bhaduri posted 4 months 4 weeks ago

The Amphan cyclone that struck the Sundarbans in the month of May this year has wreaked havoc in the area destroying lives and livelihood. A lot of the locals living in the Sundarbans depend on animal husbandry and fishing to earn a living. The cyclone destroyed animal rearing shelters and swept away most of the cattle and domestic animals.

The Amphan swept away the chicken coops and other domestic animals. This is Anup Bhakta standing with one of the few goats left after the storm. (Image: WaterAid, Subhrajit Sen)
Locals struggle with WASH issues post-Amphan
Cyclone Amphan wreaks havoc in the Sunderbans at a time when the country was already battling a large spread of Covid-19. Amita Bhaduri posted 4 months 4 weeks ago

UN’s recognition of safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as a human right recently hit a decade and this makes us ponder even more about the situation in the Sundarbans after the Amphan cyclone. The destruction caused by Amphan in the Sundarbans poses a massive threat to the very right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation of the people living there.

Having no source of water is proving to be extremely difficult for the people living in the Sundarbans. (Image: WaterAid, Subhrajit Sen)
Monsoon experiences a countrywide deficit of 10 percent in July
News this week Swati Bansal posted 5 months ago

Monsoon 2020: Countrywide deficit of 10 percent in July; September may have heavy rains

July experiences rain deficit of 10 percent (Source: IWP Flickr photos)
Building awareness to changing behaviour: A paradigm shift with digital technology
Use of online training has not only helped rural and urban residents and government in Maharashtra to become more aware, but also empowered them to take collective action to tackle the pandemic. aartikelkar posted 5 months ago

Urban India, in the grip of the pandemic

Rural training at the doorstep (Image Source: UNICEF)
When solving one problem triggers another
Use of guppy fish to control mosquito populations in water bodies has given rise to another problem - that of its negative impact on native freshwater diversity. aartikelkar posted 5 months 1 week ago

Come monsoons and vector borne diseases start making headlines every year in many parts of India, especially mosquito borne diseases like dengue, malaria, chikungunya and Japanese encephalitis.

What are vector borne diseases

Guppies for mosquito control (Image Source: Rchampagne via Wikimedia Commons)
Migration and the state amid the Covid-19 pandemic
The Covid-19 prompted migration crisis brought India’s inequalities into sharp relief. Amita Bhaduri posted 5 months 1 week ago

Through no fault of their own, migrants were forced to leave the cities after the government imposed a Covid-19 induced national lockdown in late March. After losing their work, fearing they would run out of cash and food they trudged back along with their families to the villages in search of humanity, food, and a place to live.

Migrants contribute enormously to urban society and economy (Image: Pexels)
NREGA tracker looks at the schemes’ performance
NREGA should move towards becoming an open-ended entitlement that allows every individual to work for at least 200 days, as per PAEG. Amita Bhaduri posted 5 months 2 weeks ago

As per the findings of an NREGA tracker launched by the People’s Action for Employment Guarantee (PAEG) the lockdown saw a record spike in jobs under Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA).

Women working on an NREGA site building a pond to assist in farming and water storage. Gopalpura, Jhabua, Madhya Pradesh (Image: UN Women/Gaganjit Singh)