Chemical Pollution

  • A recent study on water filter use in Ahmedabad done by the Comprehensive Initiative on Technology Evaluation (CITE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) found that household water filters were commonly used in households in Ahmedabad. However, the poor lacked access to good quality fi...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 5 months agoread more
  • “When cool air blows over the city and it rains in Bhopal bringing welcome respite to its people, I fear that toxic waste is spilling into its groundwater”, says Rajesh Kumar who shows me around the 68-acre plant site of Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL). He drives an auto for a living and is j...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 6 months agoread more
  • UP's rivers and groundwater are loaded with harmful effluents: CPCBThe Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) has told the National Green Tribunal that the groundwater as well as the rivers flowing through six districts of western Uttar Pradesh--Muzzafarnagar, Shamli, Meerut, Baghpat, Ghaziabad...
    swatiposted 4 years 6 months agoread more
  • A regional capacity development workshop on ‘Ensuring Water Security in Changing Environment Scenario for Water Professionals of South Asian Countries’ sponsored by UNESCO is being organized jointly by IIT Bombay, NIH Bhoplal Regional Centre and NIT Hamirpur on November 26-27, 201...
    nagabhushanbposted 4 years 7 months agoread more
  • Perchlorate is a chemical that is extensively used in the arms and ammunition industry. It acts as a potential thyroid disrupter and affects the uptake of iodide causing hypothyroidism and associated health effects in foetuses, infants and pregnant women. A number of animal studies have re...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 7 months agoread more
  • Current evidence shows that the number of people living in urban areas in India is expected to more than double and grow to around 800 million by 2050, which will pose unprecedented challenges for water management in the country. The paper titled 'Urban water systems in India: Typologies and hy...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 7 months agoread more
  • 40% of India still rain deficitAs predicted, El Nino has gained strength in the past two months and will continue to remain strong for some more time and also might affect next year's monsoon too. Overall the country has experienced 12% of rain deficit this year, with 47% facing normal rain, 40% def...
    swatiposted 4 years 8 months agoread more
  • Uranium in drinking waterUranium is a radioactive mineral found in the environment and is present in certain types of rocks and soils. However, it has no useful role in the human or animal bodily systems and is regarded as non essential. Chronic exposure to uranium in drinking water is a potential h...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 9 months agoread more
  • According to a recent study by the Central Pollution and Control Board (CPCB), almost half of India's interstate rivers are polluted and are of no use to anyone thus increasing the possibility of worsening of disputes over river sharing among states. Although India has a rich net...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 9 months agoread more
  • Amanishah nallah flowing through Sanganer, a town located 15 kms from Jaipur, is getting murkier by the day as the the textile hand printing industry in the area is getting more prosperous. The craft of printing colourful ethnic designs on a cotton base using natural vegetable-based dyes is centurie...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 9 months agoread more
  • With more than 8360 tons of trash created daily in Delhi, the city has three trash pile sites at Bhalaswa, Ghazipur and Okhla. In these sites technically known as landfills, garbage is buried between layers of earth to build up low-lying lands. Now, Delhi’s landfills have grown beyond big; they we...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 9 months agoread more
  • In the last 26 years, polluted river stretches rise from 22 to over 300A recent report has revealed that polluted river stretches in the country have risen 14 times in the last 26 years from 22 in 1989 to 302 now. Per environmetalists, this is because the Central Pollution Control Board ha...
    swatiposted 4 years 10 months agoread more
  • Come monsoon and the situation in the Hindon river is truly troubling. Large stretches of the river continue to suffer toxic contamination. An article by Baishali Adak in Daily Mail Online (UK) last year showed images of the effluent-laden river in the 30 km stretch in Ghaziabad. While this baffled ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 10 months agoread more
  • Contamination of surface water sources such as rivers due to metals, can often make the water dangerous to drink because of the health hazards associated with consuming toxic metals. The report titled 'Status of trace and toxic metals in Indian rivers' published by the Central Water Commission ...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 10 months agoread more
  • Huddled in the Aravali range in the southern part of Rajasthan about 26 km from Udaipur, is the largest reserve of phosphate in India. Also known as the Jhamarkotra mines, it is the only commercially exploitable rock phosphate deposit in the country. Phosphate is crucial for the sustenance of f...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • A small river flows past the village of Teja Rohela in Fazilka district, Punjab, crosses the border a couple of kilometres away, and enters Pakistan. In reality, this 'river' is a drain which takes away the toxic waste of cities located upstream. In that same village, 23 children with...
    Manu Moudgilposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • Endosulfan, a pesticide, has been banned in Kerala after its adverse effects were first realised in 1981. Shree Padre, a freelance environmental journalist, first brought out the consequences of using the pesticide by reporting on the various disabilities it caused among domestic animals and on the ...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • Committee warns against raising Sardar Sarovar Dam height In its report 'Drowning a valley: Destroying a civilization', the six-member Central Fact Finding Committee has warned that raising the height of the Sardar Sarovar Dam on the Narmada river in Gujarat will be disastrous. Also, the heigh...
    swatiposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • Goa rivers water unfit for human consumption: GSPCB In a recent study by the Goa State Pollution Control Board (GSPCB), the rivers in the state are polluted to such an extent that their waters are unfit for human consumption. Presence of faecal coliform bacteria, nearly 1,300 to 7,900 colonies per ...
    swatiposted 4 years 11 months agoread more
  • Centre gives nod to 170 eco- sensitive zones in the country The Environment Ministry has cleared 170 eco-sensitive zones in the country and by the end of the year plans to wrap up the entire business of such zones. With the completion of the mandatory 60-day period of public comments that...
    swatiposted 4 years 12 months agoread more

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When the environmental pollution caused by the footwear industry in a growing Haryana village goes unchecked, villagers gather to demand their rights.

As per the regional plan 2021 chalked out by the national capital regional planning board in 2005, Bahadurgarh, a small town in Haryana is a part of the Delhi metropolitan area. The town, located in Jhajjar district, is growing at a fast pace. It has, in the last few decades, seen development of industries, especially sanitaryware, galvanised steel pipes and footwear by the Haryana State Industrial and Infrastructure Development Corporation (HSIIDC).

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There is a need for better regulation and monitoring to bring toxin-free food to the Indian market.

“The recent scare due to the detection of formalin-laced fish across Goa, Kerala, Assam, Manipur, Nagaland and Meghalaya points to a link between water quality and food safety. Fish traders find it cost-effective to use formalin, a carcinogen, instead of ice to prevent the decomposition of fish during transportation to distant markets.

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Researchers believe there could be serious consequences if antibiotic-resistant genes move from harmless microbes to pathogens.

Antibiotic resistance is increasing in various microbial populations. A new study by Indian researchers has revealed that antibiotic-resistant genes are present in microorganisms of mangrove regions in Kerala also.

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Toxic industrial waste has polluted groundwater in Ratlam. Residents wait for action from authorities.

A resident of Bajankheda village in Ratlam district of Madhya Pradesh, Sitabai Tindor shows her pot full of water to us. A strange red, the water looks unusual. “We have been using this red water for domestic use for the last two decades. Industries in Ratlam has spoilt our land and water. The government has not provided us with any alternatives. For industrial misdeeds, why should we suffer?” asks a visibly distraught Sitabai.

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A study reveals deciduous trees with compound leaves more tolerant to air pollution.

Degrading air quality in metro cities is a matter of concern for public health. Massive tree plantation drives are often conducted in order to provide oxygen to choking cities. But trees, much like humans, also are severely affected by pollutants in the air. In such a situation, knowledge about trees capable of withstanding heavily polluted environment is needed, particularly while designing green belts in urban areas.

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Scientists and students come together to map air pollution sources in the capital.

A group of scientists and students are braving the heat and dust this summer in the national capital to map all possible sources of air pollution, so that by winter this year, we can get a fair idea of different sources of pollution in the city.

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Super tiny particles derived from table sugar can detect lead in water which is harmful for human consumption.

Nanotechnology deals with particles that are several thousand times smaller than the human hair, and it is being put to use in a variety of applications such as drug delivery and diagnostic tests. 

A group of Indian researchers has now developed a simple technique for deriving nanoparticles from table sugar and have shown that these particles can be used as sensors for detecting lead in water. 

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Neknampur lake serves as a fitting example of how low cost but effective natural techniques can be used to clean city lakes that are choking with pollutants.

A radical new method is fast emerging as an effective and sustainable solution to increasing pollution in urban lakes. Called floating treatment wetlands (FTW), they are artificial islands with plants that stay afloat on the lake. The plants clean the lake through hydroponics system, resulting in a cleaner, beautiful lake and an improved habitat for creatures that depend on it. We have already heard of this being successfully implemented in Hauz Khas lake in Delhi.

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A study finds an increased concentration of black carbon in Gangotri region during tourist seasons.

In a significant input for the growing debate on global climate change, a study by researchers at the Dehradun-based Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology (WIHG) has found that there is a remarkable increase in the concentration of black carbon in the atmosphere near the pilgrim town of Gangotri in Uttarakhand during the two annual tourist seasons of April to June and during September and October. 

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The video tells the story of residents of Korba and nearby villages who are affected by the fly ash from power plants which makes Korba the fifth critically polluted area in the country.

Korba in Chhattisgarh is an industrial area which has a significant number of coal mines and thermal power plants. Fly ash is a byproduct of the thermal power plants and has become a significant problem for the residents of Korba now. More than one lakh metric tonnes of fly ash is generated annually by the eight thermal power plants in Korba in Chhattisgarh which produce 6090 megawatts of electricity.

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