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Nidhi Singh Batra, Society for Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA)

Background

This study on the ‘Role of Informal Recyclers in Small and Medium Towns in India’ is carried out with a special focus on Raipur and Patna. It is being undertaken under the project ‘Democratizing Urban Governance: Promoting Participation and Social Accountability’ funded by the Ford Foundation.

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Twenty years of hard work and devotion has made Kalaivani from Vellitiruppur, Tamil Nadu a celebrity of sorts in the organic farming circles in Erode district and beyond.

Kalaivani, a single mother of three, took to farming after the loss of her husband almost two decades ago. Since then, she has grown all the crops on her farm without using chemical or synthetic pesticides or fertilisers. Over the last few years, she has focused her time and energy in growing organic cotton. 

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The Maharashtra Govt plans to invest Rs. 800 crore to extend the 'Shirpur Model' of groundwater recharge across the state. Is it recharge or withdrawal that this model promotes?

“What is in a name? That which we call a rose, would smell as sweet by any other”, goes the line from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. There is quite a lot in a name, Juliet, especially if attaching the wrong terminology to a process is used to appropriate public funds - Rs. 800 crores, in fact.

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Shri Montek Singh Ahluwalia, Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission, Government of India, and Ms. Naina Lal Kidwai, President, Federation of India Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI), gave the First Prize (Water Initiatives by NGOs) of the 2013 FICCI Water Awards to the Institute of Rural Research and Development (IRRAD), an initiative of S.M. Sehgal Foundation, on 6 August, 2013. The Awards Function was held at FICCI in Delhi.

Self-sufficient farming gives women in rural Alipurduar in West Bengal food, health and confidence!

Till a few decades ago, most people in India grew vegetables and fruits in their own gardens. Then something changed. We shifted from 'farming for food' to 'farming for money'. The start of the ‘green revolution’ meant that production increased but so did the farmer's dependency on chemicals, fertilizers and pesticides. This shift in farming - from lifestyle to livelihood - also resulted in women keeping away from most farming decisions even though they were involved in the various tasks of sowing, reaping, harvesting and filling up the granaries.

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