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As India grows to be the largest consumer of groundwater, a paper titled ‘Overview of Groundwater in India analyses the situation in the country.

Groundwater is the major source of drinking water in both urban and rural India, and an important source of water for agricultural and industrial sectors.

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A study by IISc on the city's water bodies argues that poor governance, lack of a sense of belonging, and poor implementation of regulatory norms has caused this situation.

India has had very little to celebrate on World Wetlands Day this year as it has lost its wetlands at an alarming rate of 38% in just a decade (1991-2001). Additionally, there continues to be a regulatory vacuum around wetlands, because of which they continue to be ungoverned and unprotected.

Lakes as one of the valuable wetlands of Bangalore

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This study provides first time evidence that the provision of hygienic latrines and piped water supply in rural villages can lead to significant reduction in the spread of diarrhoeal diseases.

Open defecation continues to be practised by as high as 65% of India's rural population and only 14% of rural households have access to piped water supply leading to high rates of infant deaths and mortality. This working paper titled 'Toilets can work: Short and medium run health impacts of addressing complementarities and externalities in water and sanitation' published by the  National Bureau of Economic Research, argues

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Greater insight into consumer behaviour can help replace blanket notions of an ‘average consumer’ with closely observed knowledge of the diversity of water use practices in domestic spaces.

An ever expanding middle class has come to symbolise a new India which is changing individual and household consumption patterns by accessing resources and technologies beyond their availabilities. Water as an everyday resource has not escaped this whirlwind of change and a substantial volume of water is being used in urban homes, where Western-influenced, water intensive forms of living are becoming the norm.

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Farmers have been known to observe the movement of ants and butterflies to forecast rainfall. Do such indigenous practices hold the key to addressing climate change issues?

Erratic rainfall, heavy storms, extreme weather and droughts are some of the major impacts of climate changes. Though it affects everyone, certain sections of society, like indigenous people who live closer to the natural environment, are in fact more vulnerable to these variations. However, they are also the first to observe, identify and formulate required strategies to adapt to climate change. This wisdom, insight and knowledge of local people is termed as indigenous technical knowledge (ITK).

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While generating gender disaggregated data, it is important to explore how to represent the gendered worlds and experiences of men and women at the smallest geographical unit--the household.

Growth and development indicators at the policy level many a times demand the need for factual data that is often standardised and expressed as numbers in order to make each local context comparable to other and allow data to be aggregated to higher geographical scales. This is also true of the field of gender and water where the need for gender disaggregated data is identified as very crucial and urgent making the generation of numbers seem like one of the important priorities.

Generating gender disaagregated data, looking beyond numbers

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Inspite of Dehradun being declared as an Ecologically Sensitive Zone 30 years ago, we couldn’t safeguard its fragility. Will the so called 'Smart City Plan' by UHUDA really help?

The Babur Nama mentions that the “the finest running water in Hindustan is that in the Dun.” The expanse of the va

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Scholars of development are puzzled that other regions where people are poorer, literacy rates lower, and drinking water more scarce, are better off that India when it comes to open defecation.

Despite India's rapid economic growth in recent decades, open defecation rates continue to be very high. This presents a unique puzzle for scholars of development because other regions where people are poorer, literacy rates lower, and drinking water more scarce, are better off that India when it comes to open defecation.

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A significant number of the urban poor purchase water from tankers and those that deliver water in plastic cans, bottles, sachets, etc, incurring a sizeable monthly expenditure on water purchases.

In India, managing the current demand and planning for future water demand in urban areas is becoming a major challenge for urban water supply authorities. According to current figures by the World Health Organisation, 10% in urban areas in India still do not have access to improved water supply.

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Poor land holding capacity, lack of irrigation facilities and inability to repay loans taken for agricultural and personal use are some reasons for the pitiful state of many farmers.

Marathwada, one of the most drought prone areas in Maharashtra, continues to be in the news over the last few months due to the severe agarian crisis that the region has been facing and the very high rates of farmers suicides.

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