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A research paper on fluoride contamination of groundwater in Unnao district of Uttar Pradesh. It assesses the exposure to fluoride through drinking water consumption and also elucidates fluoride endemic areas.

Fluoride is one of the most commonly found elements in the earth’s crust. It is naturally found d in water and helps in healthy tooth development and cavity prevention. However its high concentration in water can be harmful to human health. The amount of Fluoride (F) occurring naturally in groundwater is governed principally by climate, composition of the host rock, and hydrogeology. As per the World Health Organization and Indian Council of Medical Research the permissible limit to fluoride in drinking water is 1.5mg/L. Anything more than this value can cause fluorosis (dental and skeletal), which can affect the bones and teeth. In the backdrop of this aspect of water quality, this paper in RASĀYAN Journal of Chemistry,  tries to assess the exposure to fluoride through drinking water consumption and to elucidate fluoride endemic areas through mapping in Unnao district of Uttar Pradesh.

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An analytical paper that showcases the case study of Tiruchirapalli city, Tamil Nadu, for wastewater management

Any form of liquid waste discharged by domestic residents, industries, agriculture and commercial establishments into water is called a wastewater. This water contains different quantities of contaminants which pollutes water and makes it unfit for any productive or domestic use. Set against the backdrop of dire need for effective and efficient management of wastewater, this paper is a case study of Tiruchirapalli city in Tamil Nadu. The analysis provided in the paper is an outcome of the field work carried out in the city, which emphasises for developing a strategy for the management of wastewater.

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This report talks of the successes and challenges in fulfilling the endeavour of moving towards self reliance and access to safe drinking water and securing sanitation in north Bihar, the areas of concern and shortcomings, and acknowledges the missing links to find the way forward.


Megh Pyne Abhiyan

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Farmers utilise the permanent streams of sewage-contaminated wastewater emanating from the twin city of Hubli–Dharwad to their advantage. This paper considers the effects of the availability of this perennial water resource and its effects upon livelihood practices of farmers and the implications for health.

This paper 'Wastewater irrigation in Hubli–Dharwad, India: Implications for health and livelihoods' 

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This report by Water and Sanitation Program states that while tariff reforms in urban service delivery are still in progress, service providers could improve cost recovery considerably by introducing more efficient operational practices.

The report draws on the report by Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) study from 2008 which made a comparative analysis of 23 urban local bodies (ULBs)—looking at seven cities in detail and another 16 based on secondary data to understand the factors affecting cost recovery.

The report elaborates on specific issues under the following sections:

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This paper in International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications, tries to assess the impacts of climate change on water resources of the river basins of India, which are of great significance for domestic, industrial agricultural and hydropower scenario of the country.

The paper in its introduction states that the shortage for fresh water is becoming a limiting factor for the socio-economic development of many countries. Further the competing demand for water for domestic and industrial purposes also adds pressure to the resource.

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This paper in Indian Journal of Public Health sheds light on the specific impact of arsenic on health of children based on the review of literature on the subject.

This paper in Indian Journal of Public Health sheds light on the specific impact of arsenic on health of children based on the review of literature on the subject. The effects of chronic arsenic toxicity under the following aspects:

  • Psychological
  • Skin abnormalities
  • Lung diseases
  • Defect in intellectual function
  • Genetic issues

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Have you wondered what happens to all the garbage that your home disowns every morning ? Where does all the stuff that you throw away go ? Where does it end ? Does your neighbourhood portray its own 'dirty picture'? Can this 'trashy' image be altered ? Travel along the litter route, measure the waste you produce and along with some tips and tricks , check out our ‘waste-o-meter’ to find a few answers to this conundrum !

‘A potato peel, a piece of paper and a plastic packet’: The story of garbage

Let’s begin with a story of the journey of our junk, in a typical Indian city.

It begins when all three are thrown together into a waste bin, with many more such useless items, which have served their purpose. Early morning, at a scheduled time the ‘kachra’ man or woman comes to collect this motley bunch in a huge stained plastic bag. He drags and shoves all these onto a wheeled carriage or a hand drawn cart.

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Impact of pit-toilet leachate on groundwater chemistry and role of vadose zone in removal of nitrate and E. coli pollutants in Kolar District, Karnataka, India

Given the many problems associated with flush toilets and the sewerage system, pit toilets offer a viable solution in India. However, the use of soakpits raises the question of groundwater contamination. This paper assesses the impact of pit toilet leachate on groundwater quality in Mulbagal town (pop ~ 60,000) in Karnataka relies on pit toilets, and uses groundwater for drinking.View of the town of Mulbagal, Karnataka

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This paper published in the Journal of Global Health sheds light on the grave water scarcity that the country could face in the coming years and warns that this could happen in as few as twenty years as the demand for water continue to exceed the sources of supply. The paper argues that this will have a negative effect on the public health and sanitation situation in the country and urgent steps thus need to be taken to deal with this situation.

The paper informs that groundwater accounts for about 50%-80% of domestic water use and 45%-50% of the irrigation in the country.

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