Teesta

  • Tenzing Lepcha, the lead activist of Affected Citizens of Teesta (ACT), is proud of his work in the last year. “All this was overgrown,” he says pointing at the orderly farm. “I created the fields myself.” He shows us the carefully dug out pond for water storage, the irrigation system, the c...
    chicuposted 2 years 4 months agoread more
  • As we sit sipping tea with him, Ugen Lepcha calmly spells out his stand. “Even if it means having to leave my (political) party, I will continue to be against dams,” he says. Ugen Lepcha, the president of Passingang gram panchayat in the Dzongu area of Sikkim, clearly has courage when it comes t...
    chicuposted 2 years 5 months agoread more
  • Teesta-III project in Sikkim gets a green signalIn order to give a push to the renewable energy sector, the Centre has cleared the disputes blocking the Teesta-III hydropower project worth Rs 9000 crore. 90% work on the Teesta is already completed and with the resolving of its years-long d...
    Swati Bansalposted 4 years 12 months agoread more
  • Himachal villages to carry out own EIA90,000 people from 250 villages in the Sutlej basin of Himachal Pradesh decide to carry out their own assessment of the environmental damage caused by hydropower projects. They allege that the state-sponsored Indian Council of Forest Research and Education repor...
    ravleenposted 6 years 4 months agoread more
  • Northeast India has been in turmoil over the last two decades or so because of unbridled hydropower development in the region. This article is an effort to understand the extent of hydropower development in the region, the multi-faceted and multi layered conflicts unleashed by this development and a...
    chicuposted 6 years 6 months agoread more
  • Hydropower is considered as 'green' power and the Sikkim Government's policy has been to synchronize development imperatives with conscious efforts on environment sustainability. This paper presents the results of a survey carried out among communities living along a 54-km long project affected stre...
    chicuposted 6 years 7 months agoread more
Along with protesting against dams, the ACT leaders are leading by example and showing people of Sikkim more constructive ways to live.

Tenzing Lepcha, the lead activist of Affected Citizens of Teesta (ACT), is proud of his work in the last year. “All this was overgrown,” he says pointing at the orderly farm. “I created the fields myself.” He shows us the carefully dug out pond for water storage, the irrigation system, the compost heaps, the neatly staked peas and rows of mustard. It is difficult to recognise him now, my earlier image of him being that of a listless young Tenzing, weak from fasting for months.

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In a rare show of solidarity, the panchayat leaders of Dzongu have formed a group, Save Dzongu, that cuts across political differences to save their river.

As we sit sipping tea with him, Ugen Lepcha calmly spells out his stand. “Even if it means having to leave my (political) party, I will continue to be against dams,” he says. Ugen Lepcha, the president of Passingang gram panchayat in the Dzongu area of Sikkim, clearly has courage when it comes to his political convictions.

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Policy matters this week

Teesta-III project in Sikkim gets a green signal

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Himachal villages to carry out own EIA

Hydropower development is creating various types of conflict in Northeast India. How can we contain the unrest due to this spate of dam construction?

Northeast India has been in turmoil over the last two decades or so because of unbridled hydropower development in the region. This article is an effort to understand the extent of hydropower development in the region, the multi-faceted and multi layered conflicts unleashed by this development and also explore ways of engaging with them. It is organised around three broad sections:

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90% of people living around dams in Sikkim testify to environmental damage, increased hazards and decreased resources. Can their situation be changed?

Hydropower is considered as 'green' power and the Sikkim Government's policy has been to synchronize development imperatives with conscious efforts on environment sustainability. This paper presents the results of a survey carried out among communities living along a 54-km long project affected stretch of the Teesta river. It highlights the conflicts, community-culture-development nexus and the growing issues raised by hydropower projects in the Rangpo-Dikchu stretch in Sikkim as related by citizens of that state.

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