South 24 Parganas District

A new technology developed by Indian scientists is helping in revival of mangroves degraded due to rising sea levels, climate change and human intrusion in the Sunderbans in West Bengal.

New Delhi, September 17 (India Science Wire): A new technology developed by Indian scientists for ecological restoration is helping in revival of mangroves degraded due to rising sea levels, climate change and human intrusion in the Sunderbans in West Bengal. 

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When climate change threatens the existence of Sundarbans’ mangroves, villagers get together to plant millions of them to protect the fragile ecosystem.

Come monsoon, the villages in the Sundarbans islands witness nature’s fury with floodwaters overriding all boundaries and inundating huge tracts of land. As such, the earthen embankments, stretching to 3600 kms on the 54 inhabited islands out of a total of 102 in the Sundarbans, protect scores of people from floods and tidal waves. But what protects these embankments from angry tides? It’s the mangroves.

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News this week

2 million tonnes of food grains lost annually in India

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All the farmers and gardeners who have been part of AID and its partners Mukti & BTS’ agricultural work in the Sunderbans are practicing organic agriculture of both paddy and vegetables on a part of their land while some are doing it fully. A buzz has been created in the area about it. Many of these farmers have been trained by Saathi Revathy and many more have been trained by the trainer-farmers of the area.

Article and Video Courtesy : Association for India's Development - Johns Hopkins University

Author : Nishikant

Based on my interaction with about 150 farmers in their fields and discussions in smaller groups later on, this is what I have gathered qualitatively.

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Ujaan FestivalOrganizer: Ujaan

Venue: Frasergunj-Bakkhali, Sunderban district, West Bengal

March 10, 2011 12:00AM - March 12, 2011 12:00AM

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Cyclone Aila

Tropical Storm Aila struck southern Bangladesh and eastern India on May 27, 2009. The New York Times reported that floods and mudslides killed at least 191 people and left hundreds of thousands more homeless. As of May 27, the death toll was expected to rise. Images from The Nasa Earth Observatory.

aila_tmo_2009145

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this true-color image of Aila on May 25, 2009, the same day that the storm temporarily strengthened to a Category 1 cyclone. Aila almost completely fills this scene, stretching from the Bay of Bengal deep into India, Bangladesh, and Burma (Myanmar). On May 25, Aila's wind speeds ranged from 74 kilometers per hour (46 miles per hour or 40 knots) to 120 kilometers per hour (75 miles per hour or 65 knots). More information and detailed images can be accessed here:Cyclone Aila

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Arsenic pollution of groundwater in Bengal basin is a geological problem and it is spreading rapidly, because of emergence of new data, increased awareness and more wells being tested

This article published in Current Science discusses the nature of arsenic pollutants in the groundwater of Bengal basin. The problem of arsenic contamination in groundwater in large areas of West Bengal and Bangladesh has been receiving wide attention because groundwater is the major source of drinking water in this part of the world.

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