How bio-restoration is helping revive degraded mangroves in Sunderbans
A new technology developed by Indian scientists is helping in revival of mangroves degraded due to rising sea levels, climate change and human intrusion in the Sunderbans in West Bengal. priyad posted 2 years 4 months ago

New Delhi, September 17 (India Science Wire): A new technology developed by Indian scientists for ecological restoration is helping in revival of mangroves degraded due to rising sea levels, climate change and human intrusion in the Sunderbans in West Bengal. 

A restored site of degraded mangroves. Image credit: India Science Wire
Project power plants fear
A 1,320 MW power plant near mangrove forests of Sundarbans may have irreversible consequences. Manu Moudgil posted 4 years 9 months ago

The mangrove forests of the Sundarbans are the biggest barriers against cyclones from the Bay of Bengal, saving both India and Bangladesh from irreparable damage.

The mangrove forests of the Sundarbans are the biggest barriers against cyclones from the Bay of Bengal. Source: Laskar Sarowar/Wikimedia Commons
Tiger authority to monitor Ken-Betwa river link
Policy matters this week Swati Bansal posted 5 years 1 month ago

Constitute a committee to monitor Ken-Betwa river link, suggests NTCA

Ken-Betwa river link shown on a map. (Source: Shannon via Wikipedia)
This year witnesses record agricultural output
News this week Swati Bansal posted 5 years 2 months ago

Normal monsoon leads to record agricultural output this year

A farm in India. (Source: IWP Flickr Photos)
Community effort saves mangroves
When climate change threatens the existence of Sundarbans’ mangroves, villagers get together to plant millions of them to protect the fragile ecosystem. Usha Dewani posted 5 years 5 months ago

Come monsoon, the villages in the Sundarbans islands witness nature’s fury with floodwaters overriding all boundaries and inundating huge tracts of land. As such, the earthen embankments, stretching to 3600 kms on the 54 inhabited islands out of a total of 102 in the Sundarbans, protect scores of people from floods and tidal waves.

Mangroves of Sundarbans. (Source: Nature Environment & Wildlife Society - NEWS)
After Cyclone Aila, farming nurtures food, faith in Sunderbans
In 2009, Cyclone Aila caused significant damage to livelihoods in the Sunderbans. While saline soil is subversive to agriculture in the area, integrated farming gives many the courage to start afresh. Usha Dewani posted 6 years 3 months ago

“Another flood like Aila should never happen again, but if it does, we have the knowledge to start working on our soil again”, remarks Binota Munda of Nebukhali village in Hingalganj block, North

Seed-banks are an effective instrument to preserve local varieties and keep people together
Sunderbans and Siachen glacier to become trans-boundary protected area
Policy matters this week Swati Bansal posted 6 years 4 months ago

Sunderbans and Siachen glacier proposed to be recognised as a trans-boundary protected area

Farm fields in the Sunderbans (Source: India Water Portal Flickr Photo)
Rights of adivasis over forest lands diminishes; their consent no longer mandatory for all development projects taken up on forest land - Roundup of the week’s news (February 11-17, 2013)
Adivasis' rights over forest lands diminishes. Government dilutes its stand on requiring consent from tribals before handing over their forest lands for projects. sabitakaushal posted 8 years 10 months ago

Adivasis' rights over forest lands diminishes

The return of the earthworm: Association for India's Development's (AID-JHU) practicing organic farming in the Sunderbans
All the farmers and gardeners who have been part of AID and its partners Mukti & BTS’ agricultural work in the Sunderbans are practicing organic agriculture of both paddy and vegetables on a part of their land while some are doing it fully. A buzz has been created in the area about it. Many of these farmers have been trained by Saathi Revathy and many more have been trained by the trainer-farmers of the area. chandrasekharnemani posted 9 years 9 months ago

Article and Video Courtesy : Association for India's Development - Johns Hopkins University

Author : Nishikant

The war over blue gold
The water industry slowly shaping up, writes Tirthankar Nag. t_nag posted 10 years 4 months ago
Diamonds are expensive as they are rare, yet have very little use for our daily needs. On the other hand, fresh water which is essential to human existence is often thought of as a free or low priced commodity, mostly due to its abundance.
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