Video, Audio and other Multimedia

Pages

The many tribals who were displaced by the Dhimbe dam lost their land but not their livelihoods. They took up cage fish farming and figured out an alternate form of cultivation.

Dimbhe dam is located near the tourist spot of Bhimashankar in Maharashtra. With a capacity of 13.5 million cubic meters, the dam displaced 1253 families, submerged 11 villages and partiallly affected another 13 villages when it was completed in 2000. Today 19 villages are situated on the fringes of the Dimbhe reservoir, which provides irrigation to about 14,000 hectares of land.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Get more information on 'Quotes from the Earth'.

Know more about Toxics Link and India International Centre

Download the entry form of the event from below.

June 1, 2014 12:00AM

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Climate change is causing heavy, brief rain spells in many parts of the world. Rain-shadowed South Sikkim is bearing the brunt of it in Northeast India. The video shows how the people are adapting.

Climate change poses a threat to all. Be it forests, water or agriculture- it affects everything. India's Northeast, particularly, has witnessed a great deal of this impact. Sikkim, the physical bridge between the Northeast and mainland India, is also bearing the brunt of climate change in a myriad ways with agriculture and water bearing the most pronounced repercussions.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Khonoma village near Kohima upholds a sustainable form of jhum cultivation, which doesn't fell but only prunes trees. This video narrates how farms and forests can co-exist.

Nagaland holds many secrets of evolution and sustainable living within its green frontiers. Khonoma village near Kohima is one such plae. It is known not only for being the last frontier the British could never conquer but also for its environmental conscious community and distinct farming practices. 

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Exploitation of groundwater in Panchgani, Maharashtra, led to acute water shortage but the people of Akhegani decided to do something about it. Watch how they built spring boxes to revive springs.

The Western Ghats, known for its biodiversity, is one of India's most sought after ecological hotspots. One of its stark features is the basalt rocks, often referred to as water buckets indicating the water retention capacity of the rock, found there. Of the many popular hill stations in the Western Ghats, Panchgani is commonly visited by tourists due to its proximity to Pune, Mumbai and Mahabaleshwar. The mountains here are crowned with basalt rocks.  

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Dr. Jared Buono, hydrologist at NGO Gram Pari, spoke of a project that helped revive springs in the Western Ghats at an event organised by IIT Mumbai and India Water Portal to mark World Water Day.

The Western Ghats are made of up basalt rocks, which were formed from lava flows. These rocks are also known as water buckets as they are able to retain a lot of water. This unique feature helps create springs. At an event organised by IIT Mumbai and India Water Portal to mark World Water Day, Dr. Jared Buono talked about how springs were revived in Panchgani with the help of spring boxes. Spring boxes are structures that tap the water of a nearby village for drinking purposes. 

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The rush for caged fish culture of one variety has created a glut in the market, crashing prices. How will the farmer-fishermen cope?

The Chandil dam reservoir is located 30 kms from Jamshedpur on the Subernarekha river in Jharkhand. While this dam is a 'tourist hotspot', its construction has resulted in the displacement of more than 20,000 families from 116 surrounding villages. “We lost our farmlands because of the project and now, to support our families, we have to take any job available", says Narayan Gope. 

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Dr.Himanshu Kulkarni who was Chairman Working Group on Sustainable Groundwater Management for the 12th Plan, suggests measures to mitigate the poor groundwater scenario in the country.

Dr. Himanshu Kulkarni is the Executive Director of the Advanced Center for Water Resources Development and Management (ACWADAM), a non-profit organisation in Pune. It is a premier education and research institution, which facilitates work on groundwater management through action research programmes and training.

Dr. Kulkarni has been working on groundwater management issues in India for more than three decades. His team has conducted many studies across India and are involved in developing solutions to groundwater problems of today and tomorrow.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

The 'Jhum' farming system has been criticized as an environmentally unsustainable practice but do the strengths of the system offer a better chance in the wake of a changing climate?

Shifting cultivation, locally called 'Jhum', is a widely practiced system of crop cultivation among the indigenous communities of Northeast India. While it is generally contested as a destructive method of farming, it is also argued that the system lends itself as much more than just a farming practice. It gives a family its food, fodder, fuel, livelihood and is closely linked to their identity.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Development and modernisation come at a cost to Indigenous people who have historically struggled to assert their rights. For sustainable growth, their identity must be respected and embraced.

If you try to map where indigenous people live and where abundant biodiversity exists, you will notice a big overlap. It might seem like coincidence, but it isn't. Indigenous people have long shared and declared a strong connection to their traditional landscapes. They have had methods to protect, preserve and live harmoniously with nature.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Video, Audio and other Multimedia