Sarah Iqbal

  • Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may spark a shift towards wetter winters and drier summers, warns a new study based on evidence from climatic history preserved in 65-million-year-old oyster shells. Earlier research shows that about that time, in the Cretaceous period, atmospheric carbon di...
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  • Changes in weather are best reflected in the annual season of monsoons. Now a team of Indian researchers has recreated a continuous history of the Indian monsoon, providing new insights into forces governing it. After the 2013 floods in Kedarnath, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology (WIHG) was giv...
    arathiposted 2 years 1 day agoread more
Scientists study 65-million-year-old rainfall trends to predict future.

Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may spark a shift towards wetter winters and drier summers, warns a new study based on evidence from climatic history preserved in 65-million-year-old oyster shells.

Earlier research shows that about that time, in the Cretaceous period, atmospheric carbon dioxide levels were almost thrice the present amount. It was the most intense greenhouse phase in the history of the earth with unusually high temperature and sea levels. There is also some evidence of torrential rainfall and cyclones. 

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Indian researchers provide new insights into forces governing Indian monsoons by recreating its history over 8000 years.

Changes in weather are best reflected in the annual season of monsoons. Now a team of Indian researchers has recreated a continuous history of the Indian monsoon, providing new insights into forces governing it.

After the 2013 floods in Kedarnath, Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology (WIHG) was given the task of assessing the damage and mapping the landscape. During one such expedition, Pradeep Srivastava, a scientist at the institute, found a mound of five-metre thick peat sitting atop a glacial deposit, just a few metres from the Kedarnath temple.

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