Remote sensing and GIS applications in zonation of waterlogging in command areas – A research report by the National Institute of Hydrology
The study assesses waterlogging in a canal command area in Rohtak and Jhajjhar districts through waterlogging area zonation using multi-spectral imagery data of pre and post monsoon period.

The study assesses waterlogging in a canal command area in Rohtak and Jhajjhar districts through waterlogging area zonation using multi-spectral and multi-temporal imagery like IRS LISS III data of pre and post monsoon period. Seasonal and permanent waterlogged area and standing water were delineated on the basis of remote sensing data, digital elevation model and groundwater data.

The application of excess water and recharge from the irrigation distribution network leads to gradual rise of groundwater table and causes waterlogging. The excess soil moisture leads to salinity build up and affects crop growth adversely because of deficient aeration in the root zone depth. The remote sensing techniques reveal the physiographic, soil and hydrological differences in the study area and were valuable in carrying out the investigations.

The study presents the various norms for identification of the waterlogged areas as well as the diverse approaches to express the water table depth below the soil surface. It accepts depth of water table during pre-monsoon and post-monsoon season as the most practical approach to define waterlogging. The waterlogged area of Rohtak and Jhajjar districts has been assessed as 6.24 % and 4.17 % of their areas respectively.

The report outlines some of the remedies for waterlogging like conjunctive use of surface and groundwater, canal lining, horizontal drainage, water management, floods, construction of drains, bio-drainage and cropping pattern changes. The study recognizes the provision of adequate sub-surface drainage measures as the basis for any long term success in tackling the problem of waterlogging and soil salinity.

Download the report here:

Posted by
Attachment
Get the latest news on water, straight to your inbox
Subscribe Now
Continue reading