Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a simple method by which rainfall is collected for future usage. The collected rainwater may be stored, utilised in different ways or directly used for recharge purposes. With depleting groundwater levels and fluctuating climate conditions, RWH can go a long way to help mitigate these effects. Capturing the rainwater can help recharge local aquifers, reduce urban flooding and most importantly ensure water availability in water-scarce zones. Though the term seems to have picked up greater visibility in the last few years, it was, and is even today, a traditional practice followed in rural India. Some ancient rainwater harvesting methods followed in India include madakas, ahar pynes, surangas, taankas and many more.

This water conservation method can be easily practiced in individual homes, apartments, parks, offices and temples too, across the world. Farmers have recharged their dry borewells, created water banks in drought areas, greened their farms, increased sustainability of their water resources and even created a river. Technical know how for the rooftop RWH with direct storage can be availed for better implementation. RWH An effective method in water scarce times, it is also an easily doable practice. Practical advice is available in books written by Indukanth Ragade & Shree Padre, talks by Anupam Mishra and other easy to follow fun ways

Read our FAQ on Rainwater Harvesting and have many basic questions answered.

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Hi,
I live in Chennai in a flat. The dimensions are 300 ft length and 80 ft width. We have the same amount of open space at the backside of our flat. Our bore is situated 2ft from that open space. Apart from that space we also have 300ft x 16ft road in the front side of the flat. Even after having this much of open space (note: all open space have compound walls and water drain into the soil and does not drain out) we still face water problem in the bore. My question is : If we do rain water harvesting will it be helpful. Please clear my query.

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Hello Sir,

We are living in an apartment. We have a well in our compound. We are planning to dump all the water that gets collected on the terrance, when rains, into the well. Please let me know if we can do that or not? We don't use that well water for drinking purpose.

Thanks

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In this article, Aarti Kelkar-Khambete narrates her experience of her visit to Kasargod, Kerala to meet Sree Padreji and to see the fast disappearing Surangas

Surangas continue to be one of the relatively less known and gradually disappearing traditional water harvesting systems of Kasargod district, Kerala and are being gradually replaced by borewells to meet the water needs of the community. 

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I am a resident of Hyderabad and I would like to directly use the rain water collected on my roof. Constructed ground is hard rock with lot of efforts we dug a borewell of 420 feet. There is no chance of creating a pit for harvesting rainwater. So please suggest the ways of injecting rainwater into borewell.

My question is, is there any possibility of a borewell collapse due to this? Will there be a decrease in water flow due to this?

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Where can I get this guidelines - IS 15797:2008 - roof top rainwater harvesting guidelines?

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Organiser: Akash Ganga Trust

Venue: #4, 3rd Trust Link Street
               Mandavelipakkam, Chennai

Rain Centre is a one-stop information and assistance centre for rainwater haversting. The first of its kind in the entire country, this centre was inaugarted on August 21, 2002. The services of the centre is offered free of charge.

Download attachment for details of the program

Contact details
RSVP to
Sekhar Raghavan
Director
Rain Centre
Phone: 24616134/24918415

October 8, 2012 5:30PM - October 8, 2012 7:30PM

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Self reliance in water, a practical manual for city and town dwellers by Indukanth Ragade, describes the what, why and how of the paths towards self-reliance in water.

Self reliance in water: A practical manual for city and town dwellers by Indukanth S. Ragade (The full book is available for download on the India Water Portal.</body></html>

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This manual by the World Health Organisation sheds light on the water safety planning for drinking water systems in the context of small community managed water supply

This manual by the World Health Organisation is applicable to piped schemes, point sources such as hand pumps, protected springs or household rainwater harvesting systems and other sources. Further it provides a step-by-step approach for those charged with dealing with the everyday realities of maintaining a reliable and safe water supply.

The rationale for having water safety plans is explained by answering the following questions:

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This note on the national water law provides an account of why a national water law is necessary

This explanatory note by the Planning Commission on the national water law begins with an account of why a national water law is necessary. It was the recognition of the need for a minimal national consensus on certain basic perceptions, concepts and principles that led to the adoption of the National Water Policy of 1987 and the NWP of 2002. Currently the process of considering further revisions to the National Water Policy is in progress.

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This article by Sumathi Sivam includes a compilation of news from the newsletter Droplets

What are the emerging trends in India’s water sector? The newsletter, Droplets by Everything About Water gives an overview of the current issues in the sector by giving brief description of recent developments in water industry, technologies, products, research, reports etc,.

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