Rainwater Harvesting

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is a simple method by which rainfall is collected for future usage. The collected rainwater may be stored, utilised in different ways or directly used for recharge purposes. With depleting groundwater levels and fluctuating climate conditions, RWH can go a long way to help mitigate these effects. Capturing the rainwater can help recharge local aquifers, reduce urban flooding and most importantly ensure water availability in water-scarce zones. Though the term seems to have picked up greater visibility in the last few years, it was, and is even today, a traditional practice followed in rural India. Some ancient rainwater harvesting methods followed in India include madakas, ahar pynes, surangas, taankas and many more.

This water conservation method can be easily practiced in individual homes, apartments, parks, offices and temples too, across the world. Farmers have recharged their dry borewells, created water banks in drought areas, greened their farms, increased sustainability of their water resources and even created a river. Technical know how for the rooftop RWH with direct storage can be availed for better implementation. RWH An effective method in water scarce times, it is also an easily doable practice. Practical advice is available in books written by Indukanth Ragade & Shree Padre, talks by Anupam Mishra and other easy to follow fun ways

Read our FAQ on Rainwater Harvesting and have many basic questions answered.

  • Droughts are one of the most feared natural calamities in India impacting food production, the economy as well as the morale of millions of farmers in a country where agriculture is the livelihood of 60 percent of the population. This year too, 255 districts of the country have received deficient o...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 2 days 21 hours agoread more
  • Sikri is a small village that lies 65 km north-west of Bharatpur on the Alwar road. The village used to depend on a traditional irrigation system that assured water throughout the year. A local saying related to the water availability at Sikri goes thus: Lakh daal le chittri, jay rahoongi Sikri ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 4 days 20 hours agoread more
  • Mazhapolima wins accolades for offering sustainable solution to overcome water scarcity The community-based government programme, Mazhapolima in Thrissur district in Kerala has received the Danish Water Air Food Award 2018 for offering a sustainable solution to overcome water scarcity. The pro...
    swatiposted 1 month 2 days agoread more
  • In a drought-prone region like Vidarbha in Maharashtra, mostly in the news for water scarcity and farmer suicide, it is not every day that you hear the success story of a farmer. That's why the story of Savi Thangavel, 69, a resident of Mohegaon village which is just 22 km from Nagpur, is speci...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 month 2 weeks agoread more
  • Every time there is a huge flood in India with massive loss of lives and extensive physical damage, there is a hue and cry. Especially, if this takes place in an area not normally prone to such floods. Assam and Bihar, for instance, are regularly laid waste by floods and so, there is not much agitat...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • 1) If Agriculture borewell fails, can we restore the water in rainy season to recharge the same borewell. Can a failed borewell be converted into water source borewell to utilise the water in needy days to feed the plants. 2). For three acres of land of plants with agro-forestry method (nearly 4000...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 4 months 3 days agoread more
  • In India, although we have approximately four months of monsoon (which is basically 45 days of effective rainfall), in drought prone areas, there are only 10-15 days of harvestable rain in the entire season. If you don't get enough rain during those days, it's a cause for worry. Given that evaporat...
    priyadposted 5 months 1 week agoread more
  • Long before piped water supply became the norm, groundwater got extracted for use and rivers neglected, stepwells served as a major source of water for people. Victoria Lautman, a senior journalist and a researcher on stepwells writes in an article on Indian stepwells that these water storage struct...
    makarandpurohitposted 5 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • A growing demand for water implies the need for an improved understanding of our resources, and the ability to manage that demand in an equitable and sustainable way. Wells, not dams, have been the temples of modern India India is a groundwater economy. At 260 cubic km per year, our country is the...
    priyadposted 5 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • Up until two decades ago, the main sources of drinking water in Rajasthan included surface water from perennial ponds, reservoirs, lakes, dams, rivers and streams with borewells and tubewells used sparingly and only in remote areas. All this changed when guinea worm infections started appearing in t...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 5 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Good rainfall fails to improve Hyderabad's groundwater table Despite the city receiving excess rainfall in 2017-18, Hyderabad’s groundwater levels continue to be precarious. The city received 1123 mm of rain, nearly 44 percent higher than the normal expected rainfall last season but the increase ...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 5 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Rajasthan is all geared up for the open defecation free (ODF) status well before the national deadline of October 2, 2019. According to the assistant engineer of the nagar parishad, Resha Singh, 4.75 lakh toilets have been constructed since October 2, 2014 in Alwar district which is about to be decl...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 6 months 6 days agoread more
  • During rainy season, almost all our streets in almost all our cities get inundated with storm water. Please tell us  how best to filter, collect, store, treat and reuse the storm water in underground storage tanks  built in the compounds of houses, open places, parks and gardens etc. Reg...
    priyadposted 6 months 1 week agoread more
  • Lewari, a village located around 17 km from Alwar in Rajasthan, is the site of a water conflict these days. “The production of Jayanti jaljeera, haazme ka lalantop drink (a digestive drink) has left our village parched,” says Nanak Singh, a resident. Singh is referring to the excessive quantity ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 6 months 1 week agoread more
  • There seems to be no end to the drinking water crisis in the Bemetara district in Chhattisgarh. It is only becoming worse with every passing day. More than 40 percent of all the hand pumps installed in the district have run dry due to the depletion of groundwater level.   This situation h...
    makarandpurohitposted 6 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Hello, Every time it rains, I see huge rain water gushing through the roads and drains of Bangalore city. The entire water gets wasted as it reaches the sewage and flows out of city as sewage water. If we can stock this running water across the areas, it should recharge the depleting ground water a...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 7 months 2 days agoread more
  • Entering its second year, the Graduate Program of Water Science and Policy 2018 at Shiv Nadar University envisages a multi-disciplinary classroom, engagement and content delivered by some of the best minds globally – experts on water who have worked on ground realities, made policies and initiated...
    priyadposted 7 months 1 week agoread more
  • Gopal Nishad, a fisherman in his early 40s, is frustrated that there is hardly any fish left in the Mahanadi’s basin at Pitaibandh due to the lack of water in the basin. This basin is located near Rajim-Nawapara in Chhattisgarh, the proposed site for the fourth anicut on the Mahanadi. He reminisce...
    makarandpurohitposted 7 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Environmentalists fear new CRZ rules will favour infrastructure over coastal ecosystems Activists and environmentalists are of the opinion that the draft revised Coastal Zone Regulation Notification favour infrastructure over coastal ecosystems and livelihoods. The reduction of the definition of co...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 7 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • KSPCB says Cauvery water can be used for drinking after conventional treatment A report prepared by the Karnataka State Pollution Control Board (KSPCB) has clarified that water from River Cauvery isn’t as bad as it is made out to be. The report stated that the water can be classified under C...
    seetha@indiawat...posted 8 months 2 days agoread more

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There are many reasons why we see more droughts in India these days. Here is all the information that you need to know droughts better.

Droughts are one of the most feared natural calamities in India impacting food production, the economy as well as the morale of millions of farmers in a country where

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Once abundant with water, Sikri village is fighting a losing battle to meet its water needs.

Sikri is a small village that lies 65 km north-west of Bharatpur on the Alwar road. The village used to depend on a traditional irrigation system that assured water throughout the year. A local saying related to the water availability at Sikri goes thus: Lakh daal le chittri, jay rahoongi Sikri (You may put lakhs of fetters to stop it, but the waters will still reach Sikri). This saying has lost its sheen today as the village is now finding itself in the centre of a struggle for water among farmers.

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Mazhapolima wins accolades for offering sustainable solution to overcome water scarcity

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Farmer Thangavel tastes success with date farming in the drought-prone region of Vidarbha.

In a drought-prone region like Vidarbha in Maharashtra, mostly in the news for water scarcity and farmer suicide, it is not every day that you hear the success story of a farmer. That's why the story of Savi Thangavel, 69, a resident of Mohegaon village which is just 22 km from Nagpur, is special. He took up date farming when nobody even thought about it and became the first successful date farmer in the region.

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The reason behind Kerala floods is a lot more than what the CWC wants us to believe.

Every time there is a huge flood in India with massive loss of lives and extensive physical damage, there is a hue and cry. Especially, if this takes place in an area not normally prone to such floods. Assam and Bihar, for instance, are regularly laid waste by floods and so, there is not much agitation over that anymore.

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1) If Agriculture borewell fails, can we restore the water in rainy season to recharge the same borewell. Can a failed borewell be converted into water source borewell to utilise the water in needy days to feed the plants.

2). For three acres of land of plants with agro-forestry method (nearly 4000 plants), what is the agri-pond size and its maintenance process for long term agri activities.

Thanking you,
Regards
Raju Hegde
9986006570

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Watershed management is not just to harvest and store water but also to create democratic processes at the village level and enable inclusive, sustainable development that meets the people's needs.

In India, although we have approximately four months of monsoon (which is basically 45 days of effective rainfall), in drought prone areas, there are only 10-15 days of harvestable rain in the entire season. If you don't get enough rain during those days, it's a cause for worry.

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A temple trust revives an ancient stepwell, comes to the rescue of a water-starved village.

Long before piped water supply became the norm, groundwater got extracted for use and rivers neglected, stepwells served as a major source of water for people.

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To make access to water adequate and equitable, the focus must shift from water sources to water resources. Science, community participation and cooperation, are key to addressing our water woes.

A growing demand for water implies the need for an improved understanding of our resources, and the ability to manage that demand in an equitable and sustainable way.

Wells, not dams, have been the temples of modern India

India is a groundwater economy. At 260 cubic km per year, our country is the highest user of groundwater in the world - we use 25 percent of all groundwater extracted globally, ahead of USA and China.

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Studies reveal that efforts at guinea worm eradication have triggered the spread of hydrofluorosis in Rajasthan.

Up until two decades ago, the main sources of drinking water in Rajasthan included surface water from perennial ponds, reservoirs, lakes, dams, rivers and streams with borewells and tubewells used sparingly and only in remote areas. All this changed when guinea worm infections started appearing in the state. 

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