Rainfed Agriculture

  • India could address its water, food security by replacing rice cultivation: Study  According to a new study, India can reduce its irrigation water use to one third by replacing the water-intensive rice crop with less water-intensive cereals like maize, finger millet, pearl millet and sorghum. ...
    swatiposted 1 week 2 days agoread more
  • A study by the World Bank indicates that due to rising temperatures and changing monsoon rainfall patterns from climate change, India’s gross domestic product (GDP) may dip by 2.8 percent (amounting to $1177.8 billion) by 2050. The living standards of nearly half the country’s population will ge...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 weeks 1 day agoread more
  • Entering its second year, the Graduate Program of Water Science and Policy 2018 at Shiv Nadar University envisages a multi-disciplinary classroom, engagement and content delivered by some of the best minds globally – experts on water who have worked on ground realities, made policies and initiated...
    priyadposted 2 months 1 week agoread more
  • Lokesh Verma, a farmer from Nainital’s Chanfi village, says this is the third year in a row that he is bearing losses in agriculture. “I have lost around Rs 2 lakh and there’s a debt of Rs 70,000 to pay off. I grow strawberries, guavas and peas in my 15 bighas of land, but there is not enough ...
    arathiposted 3 months 4 hours agoread more
  • Agriculture is of central importance to India’s economy with more than half of the workforce in the country depending on it for their livelihoods. However, it is increasingly being threatened due to climate-change-induced changing rainfall patterns and water scarcity having a negative impact on pr...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 3 months 6 days agoread more
  • The GFES initiative aims to support the collaboration between users and researchers in the earlier stages of water science and promote the assimilation of local knowledge and users experiences into research design to develop ideas for future India-UK water research. GFES will take the...
    priyadposted 3 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • Small farmers are the key to ending poverty and hunger and promoting sustainable development. In India, small and marginal farmers—those who work on less than two hectares (five acres) of land—constitute 80 percent of all farm households, 50 percent of rural households and 36 percent of the tota...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 3 months 4 weeks agoread more
  • Scanty rainfall, depleting groundwater levels, barren farmlands and mass migration of farmers to cities for better livelihood--this is the reality of most of rural India today. Many parts of India are witnessing this growing trend of farmers leaving their lands in search of jobs in cities. Andhra Pr...
    arathiposted 4 months 1 week agoread more
  • Every year, thousands of villages in Maharashtra get affected by droughts. Experts say that the reasons for recurrent droughts include a lack of policy framework, technical knowledge and community participation as well as poor implementation of government programmes. Until 1970, the residents of Ka...
    makarandpurohitposted 5 months 17 hours agoread more
  • Water is a crucial part of all societies as it has myriad uses. In India, however, it is of much more importance as over 600 million people make a living off the land. They rely on the monsoon to replenish their water sources and the unpredictable nature of rain leaves them vulnerable. Even today, t...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 5 months 3 days agoread more
  • This year’s budget was expected to be extensively farmer- and rural-sector oriented. And that is exactly what it turned out to be. The distress in the agrarian sector has intensified and its political implications were rife this year considering the Lok Sabha elections are scheduled next year. The...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 months 1 week agoread more
  • Pitidri is a nondescript village that dots the rainshadow area of Purulia district in West Bengal. Droughts are common here even when the area is endowed with above average rainfall of over 1300 mm a year. Until some time ago, Urmila Mahato, a 42-year-old farmer from Pitidri had been struggling to e...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 5 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Alternative Futures: India Unshackled is a riveting new book that brings together scenarios of an India that is politically and socially egalitarian, radically democratic, economically sustainable and equitable, and socio-culturally diverse and harmonious. Edited by KJ Joy and Ashish Kothari, w...
    priyadposted 5 months 4 weeks agoread more
  • Assam prepares river atlas to tackle floods, erosion, deforestation The Assam government is preparing a river atlas with the aid of the North Eastern Space Application Centre (NESAC) that would serve as a comprehensive database of all major and minor rivers of the state. Besides serving as a databa...
    swatiposted 6 months 5 days agoread more
  • Government approves Rs 5,369 crore for Jal Vikas Marg Project With the technical assistance and investment support from the World Bank, the Centre has given its approval to Rs 5,369 crore Jal Vikas Marg Project for capacity augmentation of navigation on the Haldia-Varanasi stretch of National ...
    swatiposted 6 months 1 week agoread more
  • Yet again, North India shrouded in heavy smog Delhi and parts of north India are once again enveloped in heavy toxic smog, thanks to crop burning in Punjab. Taking note of the crisis, the National Green Tribunal has rapped the state governments concerned and has instructed them to ta...
    swatiposted 8 months 1 week agoread more
  • The theme for the Conclave this year is “Water Use Efficiency: An Imperative for India” to highlight the imperative of water use efficiency in the industry, agriculture and urban contexts.  The Indian economy at present is struggling with excessive population growth and changing water reso...
    Water Awards 2016posted 8 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • Marathwada in Maharashtra is an arid region with rainfall of less than 750 mm per year. Most villages in the region face acute water scarcity. Kachner in Aurangabad was no exception.  This meant that only rainfed agriculture was possible when the rains were good. Most of the year, and particul...
    arathiposted 11 months 2 days agoread more
  • Decades of skating over environmental concerns have clearly cost us dear. The folly of pursuing better crop yields using chemical fertilisers in an indiscriminate manner has been surfacing lately. “Decades of agricultural abuse using fertilisers, herbicides and pesticides have taken its toll on us...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 11 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Vasant Baburao Parkale, a 52-year-old farmer, has become a role model for many farmers in the drought-prone Marathwada region. His determination and the will to excel in life have helped him to transform his dreams into reality. In 1984, he was just another labourer working for Bhagwan Yashwantrao ...
    makarandpurohitposted 11 months 3 weeks agoread more

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India could address its water, food security by replacing rice cultivation: Study 

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Seven out of the top 10 climate hotspots in India in the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra, says a World Bank study.

A study by the World Bank indicates that due to rising temperatures and changing monsoon rainfall patterns from climate change, India’s gross domestic product (GDP) may dip by 2.8 percent (amounting to $1177.8 billion) by 2050. The living standards of nearly half the country’s population will get depressed.

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Entering its second year, the Graduate Program of Water Science and Policy 2018 at Shiv Nadar University envisages a multi-disciplinary classroom, engagement and content delivered by some of the best minds globally – experts on water who have worked on ground realities, made policies and initiated change.

June 30, 2018 12:00AM

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More than 1000 villages of the state are expected to be affected by a severe water crisis.

Lokesh Verma, a farmer from Nainital’s Chanfi village, says this is the third year in a row that he is bearing losses in agriculture. “I have lost around Rs 2 lakh and there’s a debt of Rs 70,000 to pay off. I grow strawberries, guavas and peas in my 15 bighas of land, but there is not enough water in the hills to irrigate crops properly,” he says.

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This study finds that small farmers who undertake group micro irrigation through pooling of land and water resources greatly benefit through increase in productivity and profit margins.

Agriculture is of central importance to India’s economy with more than half of the workforce in the country depending on it for their livelihoods. However, it is increasingly being threatened due to climate-change-induced changing rainfall patterns and water scarcity having a negative impact on production.

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The GFES initiative aims to support the collaboration between users and researchers in the earlier stages of water science and promote the assimilation of local knowledge and users experiences into research design to develop ideas for future India-UK water research.

July 1, 2018 12:00AM - August 15, 2018 12:00AM

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There are various reasons why India’s small and marginal farmers are unhappy.

Small farmers are the key to ending poverty and hunger and promoting sustainable development. In India, small and marginal farmers—those who work on less than two hectares (five acres) of land—constitute 80 percent of all farm households, 50 percent of rural households and 36 percent of the total of all households. Sadly, the plight of these farmers is very distressing. Agricultural productivity levels have been stagnant for the past 10 to 15 years. An estimated 70 percent of the country’s arable land is prone to drought, 12 percent to floods, and 8 percent to cyclones.

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One of the worst affected districts in Andhra Pradesh, Anantapur is seeing its farmers leave their villages for cities due to water scarcity.

Scanty rainfall, depleting groundwater levels, barren farmlands and mass migration of farmers to cities for better livelihood--this is the reality of most of rural India today. Many parts of India are witnessing this growing trend of farmers leaving their lands in search of jobs in cities. Andhra Pradesh is no different with several districts of the state seeing a rising rate in outmigration of farmers.

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The video tells us the success story of Kakaddara village that won the Satyamev Jayate Water Cup-2017 by efficiently managing its water.

Every year, thousands of villages in Maharashtra get affected by droughts. Experts say that the reasons for recurrent droughts include a lack of policy framework, technical knowledge and community participation as well as poor implementation of government programmes.

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As the country runs out of water fast, India needs to change its game for sustenance. Replacing water-intensive crops with sustainable ones in dry areas is a step in the right direction.

Water is a crucial part of all societies as it has myriad uses. In India, however, it is of much more importance as over 600 million people make a living off the land. They rely on the monsoon to replenish their water sources and the unpredictable nature of rain leaves them vulnerable. Even today, the country breaks out in a cold sweat every time the south-west monsoon is delayed.

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