Quality, Standards and Testing

Water needed for human consumption, industrial purposes or other requirements must cater to certain minimum standards. The quality of any water is defined by its physical and chemical properties (characteristics). Physical properties include its appearance (colour, clarity and odour, perhaps also its taste) while the chemical properties refer to the constituents dissolved in it. Some of the physical properties are measurable and can be expressed in units of measurement while others like appearance, odour or taste are clearly subjective. However, all the chemical constituents can be measured accurately.

Drinking water must meet certain quality standards to safeguard the health of the people. The permissible and desirable limits of various parameters in drinking water have been detailed as per the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) standard specifications for potable water. These parameters are included in BIS-10500-1991. The various parameters covered include colour, odour, pH, total dissolved solids, hardness, alkalinity, elemental compounds such as iron, manganese, sulphate, nitrate, chloride, fluoride, arsenic, chromium, copper, cyanide, lead, mercury, zinc and coliform bacteria. The tolerance limits for inland surface waters for various classes of water use have been published by the Central Water Commission. Per ISI-IS: 2296-1982, the tolerance limits of parameters are specified as per classified use of water depending on various uses of water ranging from Class A to Class E.

What does the water that one drinks contain, what substances are dissolved in it and what are their safe limits? What are the issues that affect water quality? For more detailed information on all this, please read our FAQs on Rules, Regulations & Standards concerning water and Equipments used to measure water quality and quantity

  • A seasonal river in Pali, Rajasthan, the Bandi is nothing short of a sewer. The textile town has witnessed rampant industrial growth, raw sewage discharges and toxic contamination of its waters. The river, which is devoid of lean season flow, is polluted up to 55 km downstream. The river water is un...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 weeks 1 day agoread more
  • “Sometimes I go for open defecation, sometimes I use the toilet. It’s not like I always have to use the toilet. When I go for work here and there, I defecate in the jungle,” says Renu from one of the remote villages in Tehri Garwal district of Uttarakhand when asked why she does not use latrin...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 3 weeks 2 days agoread more
  • In the early hours, the villagers of Khalabari, a tribal-dominated village in the Dumuripadar gram panchayat of Koraput district in Odisha step out of their houses for bringing wood and drinking water. The road to the forest where the water is available is rocky. Both women and men walk a few kilome...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 month 2 days agoread more
  • Yet again, North India shrouded in heavy smog Delhi and parts of north India are once again enveloped in heavy toxic smog, thanks to crop burning in Punjab. Taking note of the crisis, the National Green Tribunal has rapped the state governments concerned and has instructed them to ta...
    swatiposted 1 month 2 days agoread more
  • Urmila Devi lives in Chaitabazaar village which is barely five kilometres from the eastern bank of the Burhi Gandak river. It is located in a particularly flood-prone area of East Champaran in north Bihar. The drinking water quality in this area is poor. The recurrent floods only make it w...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 month 3 days agoread more
  • Concerned with contaminated water sources in rural areas, the Centre plans to provide piped water supply (classified as an improved water source by the WHO & UNICEF Joint Monitoring Report) to 80 percent rural households in the country by 2022. Better access to drinking water is certainly good n...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 1 month 5 days agoread more
  • The theme for the Conclave this year is “Water Use Efficiency: An Imperative for India” to highlight the imperative of water use efficiency in the industry, agriculture and urban contexts.  The Indian economy at present is struggling with excessive population growth and changing water reso...
    Water Awards 2016posted 1 month 1 week agoread more
  • Study says 40 percent of NCR's water bodies lost to urbanisation in 42 years As per a study conducted by IIT Delhi, nearly 40 percent of water bodies in the national capital region (NCR) has disappeared between 1972 and 2014 due to rapid urbanisation. The study also revealed that due...
    swatiposted 1 month 2 weeks agoread more
  • Hello, I am looking for CPCB guidelines for acceptable water quality from an STP for usage in: irrigation, disposal into a storm water drain, and drinking. I could not find on their website. Can anyone help? Thanks, Parag Mody Goa
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 1 month 2 weeks agoread more
  • In India, most families depend on borewell or well water. Most cities like Bangalore, Mumbai, Pune, etc get well or borewell water for drinking. Borewell water is usually safe to drink but it is not 100 percent pure because of its hardness and contamination level. Your borewell water might contain b...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 1 month 2 weeks agoread more
  • The 15th EverythingAboutWater Expo 2018 will be held on August 23-25, 2018 | Hall No. 12A, Pragati Maidan, Delhi, India The Expo will be one of the most unique and comprehensive annual water events in India showcasing latest technologies in the water and wastewater management sector. Also reco...
    EA Water Pvt Ltdposted 1 month 2 weeks agoread more
  • Solawata, a small village in Jaipur district is barely 10 kilometers away from Sambhar, India's largest saline lake which is a major centre of salt production that produces about two lakh tonnes of salt a year. On our way to the village from Sambhar, we see caravans packed with bright coloured camel...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 1 month 4 weeks agoread more
  • 1. We are an apartment complex with 320 families and a Aerobic STP of 1,50,00LPD. We have recently started using STP treated water into toilet flushing. Since same water is re-circulated repeatedly, I am concerned that URIC ACID concentration will get higher over a period of time as it never gets el...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 2 months 1 day agoread more
  • My borewell is located near to the compound wall. After few days of borewell drilling sewage started to get collected on the nearby plot which is hardly 3 feet from the borewell. We drilled for 200 feet. Water levels in the nearby borewell are < 50 feet. We used casing pipe for 35 feet after that...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 2 months 2 days agoread more
  • Can you comment on licences or permissions to be obtained by Sea Ports (Ex: Mormugao Port Trust)?
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 2 months 2 days agoread more
  • Shilpi Bai was just 18 when she got married to Magan Singh Solanki in Jamnia village, in Dhar district, Madhya Pradesh. She had dreams in her eyes of a great life ahead. She was healthy and soon became a mother of two children. Her husband was a farmer and she would help him in the field after compl...
    arathiposted 2 months 1 week agoread more
  • In India, fresh water is depleting fast with the rise in consumption for economic activities. Poor management of water resources has led to overexploitation of groundwater. The World Resources Institute’s March 2016 report said 54 percent of India was water stressed, with scarcity affecting every ...
    arathiposted 2 months 1 week agoread more
  • Women of Podapathar village in Sundargarh district in Odisha have become an inspiration for millions of women in the country now, thanks to their determination to improve the drinking water situation in their village.  Earlier the women had to fetch water for domestic use&n...
    makarandpurohitposted 2 months 1 week agoread more
  • The problem of Bengaluru’s water is well known. The demand for water tankers skyrockets during the summer months, when municipal and borewell water supplies run dry, and many of the city’s lakes, actually man-made tanks, lie neglected and polluted. While legislation on rainwater harvesting ...
    priyadposted 3 months 4 days agoread more
  • Heavy metal poisoning is a growing concern in many parts of the country. A new method for removing chromium-6, a highly toxic heavy metal, from waste water has been developed by a group of scientists from India and Ethiopia. They claim it to be low-cost and safe. The new method uses water hyacinth,...
    priyadposted 3 months 1 week agoread more

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Mahaveer Singh Sukarlai was awarded the Bhagirath Prayas Samman at the India Rivers Day 2017 for his valiant effort to safeguard the integrity of the Bandi river in Pali.

A seasonal river in Pali, Rajasthan, the Bandi is nothing short of a sewer. The textile town has witnessed rampant industrial growth, raw sewage discharges and toxic contamination of its waters. The river, which is devoid of lean season flow, is polluted up to 55 km downstream. The river water is unfit for drinking as well as irrigation.

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A study from remote villages in rural Uttarakhand finds that toilet use is influenced by geography, accessibility, availability of infrastructure and occupation of villagers.

“Sometimes I go for open defecation, sometimes I use the toilet. It’s not like I always have to use the toilet. When I go for work here and there, I defecate in the jungle,” says Renu from one of the remote villages in Tehri Garwal district of Uttarakhand when asked why she does not use latrines every day.

Although there is a government-constructed latrine with a water tap that she and her family use when they are at home, she sees no point in coming back home to use the toilet when she goes out to graze animals or to collect firewood a long way into the jungle.

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The villagers of Khalabari are hopeful that the overhead tank being built in the village would make drinking water easily accessible to them.

In the early hours, the villagers of Khalabari, a tribal-dominated village in the Dumuripadar gram panchayat of Koraput district in Odisha step out of their houses for bringing wood and drinking water. The road to the forest where the water is available is rocky. Both women and men walk a few kilometres on the harsh terrain to bring essential commodities needed for their survival. Khalabari, with a population of 186, has 45 households. 

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Yet again, North India shrouded in heavy smog

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A new biosand filter is revolutionising water purification in rural India with increased filtration, better portability and affordability.

Urmila Devi lives in Chaitabazaar village which is barely five kilometres from the eastern bank of the Burhi Gandak river. It is located in a particularly flood-prone area of East Champaran in north Bihar. The drinking water quality in this area is poor. The recurrent floods only make it worse.

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A study from rural Maharashtra finds piped water supply does not guarantee safe drinking water. Water treatment, storage and WASH practices influence water quality.

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The theme for the Conclave this year is “Water Use Efficiency: An Imperative for India” to highlight the imperative of water use efficiency in the industry, agriculture and urban contexts

November 28, 2017 10:00AM
November 27, 2017 12:00PM

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News this week

Study says 40 percent of NCR's water bodies lost to urbanisation in 42 years

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Hello, I am looking for CPCB guidelines for acceptable water quality from an STP for usage in: irrigation, disposal into a storm water drain, and drinking. I could not find on their website. Can anyone help?

Thanks, Parag Mody

Goa

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Borewell water is used for drinking in many parts of India. Here are some purifiers you can use if the water is impure or hard.

In India, most families depend on borewell or well water. Most cities like Bangalore, Mumbai, Pune, etc get well or borewell water for drinking. Borewell water is usually safe to drink but it is not 100 percent pure because of its hardness and contamination level. Your borewell water might contain bacteria, viruses and heavy metals like arsenic, fluoride, lead, etc. In simple words, water gets its hardness from dissolved calcium and magnesium in the water. Borewell water tastes a little sour but it generally doesn’t pose any health hazard. 

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