Groundwater

  • The body of Guria Das looked like that of a three-year-old when she passed away at the age of 13. Guria was born in 1999 with a condition that constrained her growth. Her father, Chhatua Das recounts how Guria, unable to speak or move, communicated with him and his wife through gestures; a language ...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 weeks 6 days agoread more
  • Malguzari tanks were ponds made for water harvesting by the Malguzaars, who were zamindars or tenants in eastern Vidarbha, Maharashtra two centuries ago.These tanks provided water for irrigation and also increased the availability of fish for local consumption. Before 1950, the Malguzaars construct...
    makarandpurohitposted 3 weeks 1 day agoread more
  • Champa Devi has been working as a sharecropper on a two-acre farm at Nilothi village in west Delhi. Until a few years ago, the water she used for irrigation came from the Najafgarh drain that empties into the Yamuna river. This form of cultivation using waste water was a norm in the area till someti...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 3 weeks 1 day agoread more
  • Temples in India have always had a water body near its premises. Whether it is a natural pond, a free-flowing river or a man-made tank, the water inside them seem to imbibe the sacredness associated with the temples, thereby becoming an integral part of the cultural, social and religious landscape o...
    sabitakaushalposted 3 weeks 1 day agoread more
  • The summer of 2015 saw Maharashtra reeling under severe drought. The government launched Jalyukt Shivar Abhiyaan (JYS) [2], that involves deepening and widening of streams and nullahs, construction of cement and earthen stop dams, and digging of farm ponds [2] to mitigate the annual drought situ...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 4 weeks 21 hours agoread more
  • Water crisis is a reality in most of India. After the summer of droughts come the monsoon floods. Take Maharashtra, for instance. If at one time it is desperately searching for drinking water, at another time, its capital, Mumbai is wading through knee-high water. How do we overcome these annual cri...
    Manu Moudgilposted 1 month 16 hours agoread more
  • Take the roads of Punjab during the monsoon and you will find most fields turned into pools of water. It’s mainly the water pulled out from the underground vault to support the kharif crop of paddy. Neither a native plant nor suited to the agro-climatic region, paddy has pushed out maize and cotto...
    Manu Moudgilposted 1 month 2 days agoread more
  • Summer temperatures soar to a gruelling 50ocelsius in Rapar, a little known block in Gujarat’s Kutch district. Land here is dry, saline and arid; the monsoon is erratic. Many a times, the entire year’s rain falls in a short span of two or three days, doing more harm than good. Dubbed a dark zone...
    sabitakaushalposted 1 month 5 days agoread more
  • About the opportunity: ACWADAM and the Forum for Policy Dialogue on Water Conflicts in India (Forum) have invited case studies covering narratives, analyses and syntheses of groundwater competition and conflict from any part of India. The case studies, on the minimum should cover the following: ...
    swatiposted 1 month 1 week agoread more
  • The cracks on the parched land of Bundelkhand are waiting for the monsoon to quench the thirst of its arid landscape. Despite the wide-spread drought here, Pipara, one of the villages in the region, stands apart as the only one that has not run completely dry.  “Only seven-10 percent of vill...
    makarandpurohitposted 1 month 3 weeks agoread more
  • Vikram Patel, a 71-year-old farmer in Chidavad village of Dewas district in Madhya Pradesh is one of the first farmers to have embraced the idea of farm ponds to increase the groundwater level in his farm. “For the last two decades, the Chidavad village in the Tonk Khurd block, was one among the ...
    makarandpurohitposted 2 months 4 days agoread more
  • Power firms’ loss due to water shortage is Rs 2400 crore this year: Greenpeace According to the new report by Greenpeace titled, Water demands of coal power plants in drought affected regions of India, the country has lost almost seven billion units of electricity causing a revenue loss of Rs 240...
    swatiposted 2 months 1 week agoread more
  • Ramesh Mali, a farmer in his late thirties, looks at his farmland nervously. It has been 13 days since the Simhastha Maha Kumbh festival, 2016, concluded. The district administration had acquired his four bigha land (approximately 0.64 hectares) for the festival. The barricades and the concrete left...
    makarandpurohitposted 2 months 1 week agoread more
  • Hi We are having an output of more than 200kld of treated wastewater which is going down the drain. We would like to reuse the waste water either through soaking pits or by injection bore well so that the ground water table is charged. Latest test reports reveal that the pH is 7.32, turbidity is NT...
    Anonymous (not verified)posted 2 months 2 weeks agoread more
  • With increasing concern over water security, water governance worldwide is undergoing a gradual change. This paper 'New institutional structure for water security in India' published in the Economic and Political Weekly informs that inspite of increasing water security concerns, there has not been a...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 2 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • The residents of Bankpura village in Dhar district in Madhya Pradesh, Dilip Bundela (19), Seema Kalu (20) and Naval Singh (35), have one thing in common. All three of them suffer from skeletal fluorosis. Skeletal fluorosis is a bone disease that is caused by the accumulation of fluoride in th...
    sabitakaushalposted 2 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Hirehandigola village in Gadag district of North Karnataka is an unsurprising picture of rural India. Hot, dry and dusty, it is populated by a largely lingayat community. About half the village has household toilets, significantly higher than the district average of 24% as per the 2011 Census. At fi...
    priyadposted 2 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • The legend has it that in the year 1321-22, mystic and 14th century Sufi saint Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya began digging a stepwell or baoli around the same time the then Delhi ruler Ghiyas-ud-Din Tughlaq was building his own splendid city, Tughlakabad. A fe...
    sabitakaushalposted 2 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • It would not be an exaggeration to say Subarnarekha (Line of gold) is a film that left an indelible mark on Indian cinema. The film, by Ritwik Ghatak, is inspired by a river by the same name and narrates the reality around the river which flows through the present day Jharkhand, West Bengal and Odis...
    Amita Bhaduriposted 2 months 3 weeks agoread more
  • Although agriculture is the largest source of livelihood for people in India, its share in the gross domestic product (GDP) has been declining over time with deficit rainfall over the last two years having affected crop production and farmer's incomes. This article 'Water management and resilience ...
    aarti kelkar kh...posted 3 months 2 weeks agoread more

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Villagers of Jadugoda say the radiation from the uranium mines is impairing their children. It’s high time the government took measures against it so a generation is not left crippled.

The body of Guria Das looked like that of a three-year-old when she passed away at the age of 13. Guria was born in 1999 with a condition that constrained her growth. Her father, Chhatua Das recounts how Guria, unable to speak or move, communicated with him and his wife through gestures; a language that only the three of them could comprehend. Born in Jadugoda, in Purbi Singhbhum district in Jharkhand, Guria was one of the many children who succumbed to the health complications from excessive radiation from the uranium mines.

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Caught between Malguzaars and the state government, the Malguzari tanks were left to die many years ago. A lone man spearheaded their revival in 2008.

Malguzari tanks were ponds made for water harvesting by the Malguzaars, who were zamindars or tenants in eastern Vidarbha, Maharashtra two centuries ago.These tanks provided water for irrigation and also increased the availability of fish for local consumption.

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With the sewage-fed vegetable cultivation on Yamuna riverbed banned, the farmers are worried about their livelihood.

Champa Devi has been working as a sharecropper on a two-acre farm at Nilothi village in west Delhi. Until a few years ago, the water she used for irrigation came from the Najafgarh drain that empties into the Yamuna river. This form of cultivation using waste water was a norm in the area till sometime ago.

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Millions of devotees travel to the Mahamaham tank every 12 years to wash away their sins in the holy rivers believed to converge in the tank.

Temples in India have always had a water body near its premises. Whether it is a natural pond, a free-flowing river or a man-made tank, the water inside them seem to imbibe the sacredness associated with the temples, thereby becoming an integral part of the cultural, social and religious landscape of that area. 

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The flagship scheme of Maharashtra’s water conservation department, Jalyukt Shivar, is worrying for its myopic vision and faulty implementation, say experts

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An NGO’s effort to recharge the groundwater in an area finds little success with water-guzzling crops that rule the market.

Water crisis is a reality in most of India. After the summer of droughts come the monsoon floods. Take Maharashtra, for instance. If at one time it is desperately searching for drinking water, at another time, its capital, Mumbai is wading through knee-high water. How do we overcome these annual crises? Unfortunately, the answers are not so easy to find. 

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How paddy grew in popularity in Punjab and continues to steal the show, thanks to lack of alternatives for farmers.

Take the roads of Punjab during the monsoon and you will find most fields turned into pools of water. It’s mainly the water pulled out from the underground vault to support the kharif crop of paddy. Neither a native plant nor suited to the agro-climatic region, paddy has pushed out maize and cotton, which were common in the pre-green revolution era. From 2,27,000 hectares in 1960, the area under paddy rose to 26,12000 hectares by the year 2000. A growth rate of 1,050 percent!

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How an arid, saline land where migration in search of water and jobs was a way of life, boasts of plenty of water now.

Summer temperatures soar to a gruelling 50ocelsius in Rapar, a little known block in Gujarat’s Kutch district. Land here is dry, saline and arid; the monsoon is erratic. Many a times, the entire year’s rain falls in a short span of two or three days, doing more harm than good. Dubbed a dark zone, groundwater extraction is rampant even as agriculture remains the main source of income.

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About the opportunity:

July 18, 2016 12:00AM

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Pipara village in the parched Bundelkhand region stands out for its uninterrupted water supply. The village has their women to thank for it.

The cracks on the parched land of Bundelkhand are waiting for the monsoon to quench the thirst of its arid landscape. Despite the wide-spread drought here, Pipara, one of the villages in the region, stands apart as the only one that has not run completely dry. 

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