Eastern Himalayas

Pages

Policy matters this week

Centre notifies minimum e-flow for the Ganga river

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

News this week

Nearly 30 percent of springs in the Himalayas are drying up: Niti Ayog

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Along with protesting against dams, the ACT leaders are leading by example and showing people of Sikkim more constructive ways to live.

Tenzing Lepcha, the lead activist of Affected Citizens of Teesta (ACT), is proud of his work in the last year. “All this was overgrown,” he says pointing at the orderly farm. “I created the fields myself.” He shows us the carefully dug out pond for water storage, the irrigation system, the compost heaps, the neatly staked peas and rows of mustard. It is difficult to recognise him now, my earlier image of him being that of a listless young Tenzing, weak from fasting for months.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

In a rare show of solidarity, the panchayat leaders of Dzongu have formed a group, Save Dzongu, that cuts across political differences to save their river.

As we sit sipping tea with him, Ugen Lepcha calmly spells out his stand. “Even if it means having to leave my (political) party, I will continue to be against dams,” he says. Ugen Lepcha, the president of Passingang gram panchayat in the Dzongu area of Sikkim, clearly has courage when it comes to his political convictions.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

In a two-part series, we look at the health of rivers across India. Here’s a comprehensive assessment of the rivers of the north and the east.

Rivers in India are always in the news whether it’s the interstate water sharing disputes, dams, sand mining or the recent order of the Uttarakhand high court declaring Ganga and Yamuna as living entities. Seven major river systems, over 400 rivers and numerous streams have sustained lives and livelihoods in India for centuries. Enormous pressure from faulty management practices is confining these lifelines to dams and canals, encroaching their space, pouring untreated sewage into them, and lifting sands from their banks.

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

News this week

Normal monsoon expected this year: IMD

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Fish species are rapidly disappearing from Himalayan rivers. Dams are not the reason. Human activity is.

Jaman Ram, a resident of Bhikia Sain, a tehsil in Uttarakhand, remembers fishing with his father in the Ramganga. “We could catch 80-100 kilograms of fish a day. That is no longer possible,” he says. Shafiq of Haldwani shares an unsettling memory of the Ramganga. As a young man on a holiday, he was paddling in the river near Marchula when the rock he was standing on shifted. Thinking he was standing on a loose boulder, he stepped away from it only to see the “rock” glide away. It was a large “goonch”, a fish mighty enough to support a man on its back.

Attachments

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

News this week

Glacial lakes pose flood risk to 441 hydel projects in Himalayan region

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

News this week

Environment minister calls Delhi pollution 'emergency situation'

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

About the event:

January 31, 2016 9:00AM - February 1, 2016 6:00PM

Topics

Sub-Categories

Regions

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Eastern Himalayas