Assessment of water and sanitation facilities of Madanpur Khadar in New Delhi - A research study

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Posted on March 20, 2010 - 05:30
This research study done as part of the author's dissertation work is an attempt to assess the water and sanitation situation of a resettlement colony, Madanpur Khadar, on the outskirts of New Delhi.

This research study done as part of the author's dissertation work is an attempt to assess the water and sanitation situation of a resettlement colony, Madanpur Khadar, on the outskirts of New Delhi. The lack of safe drinking water and sanitation facilities is a major problem affecting most communities, particularly rural and urban slum and resettlement colonies like Madanpur Khadar. 

The main findings of the study are -

  • Water and sanitation conditions in the community were unsatisfactory, with no access to clean water for drinking purposes, unclean or no toilets and improper disposal of solid waste.
  • The main source of drinking water for all the residents of Madanpur Khadar was hand pumps (76.2 %). The remaining families relied on either packaged mineral water (13.8%) or Delhi Jal Board (DJB) water tankers (10%). 
  • At least one hand-pump was easily found in front of a cluster of two-three households. The quality of the water from hand-pumps was reported to be sub-standard.
  • The supply of the water by the Delhi Jal Board tankers was irregular and grossly inadequate, especially during summer months. Packaged mineral water cost about Re 1/litre.
  • The study revealed that the households largely depend on community toilet complexes (Sulabh Sauchalays), for their sanitation needs as they did not have space for constructing toilets inside the homes. Re 1 was charged per visit, for using the community toilet complexes.
  • The streets are narrow and lined with water clogged drains on both the sides, causing proliferation of mosquitoes and flies. The drains are broken and solid waste from the homes and construction material is dumped in the drains causing clogging of the drains. The parks are used as dumping ground by the community. 
  • Only 13.8 % of the respondents were willing to pay for the water consumed by them if provided through taps, whereas none of the respondents agreed to pay for better sanitary facilities.
Download the research study here:
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2010